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  1. Dose anyone understand this video, did western mused used to be on a different frequency?
  2. As written in the sing for Dummies book Knowing how to move the soft palate and coordinate that movement with your tongue is important for speaking and singing, because you want the soft palate to lift for a resonant tone. If the soft palate doesn’t lift, you make a sound that has too much resonance in your nose, or a “nasal sound,” as you may have heard someone say. ADVERTISING To make a sound that has a resonant tone, explore the following exercises to help you feel the movement of the tongue and soft palate in words. You can then apply that same knowledge to your singing
  3. What is the best way to talk about the anatomy and physiology of the voice (to any age from elementary-adults) while keeping students engaged?
  4. Hi. I seem to have a problem. I imagine a pitch in my head before I sing it. But the thing is, while I'm singing it, it sounds normal, but when played back, I hear a constant microtonal flat. A friend told me that it might be because my pitch expectations are warping my perception of what is actually coming out of my mouth. In other words, it seems that I'm hearing the expected/imagined pitch more than the actual one. Another friend told me that the "formant/timbre" of my voice is higher in my head than what is actually heard outside. My voice literally sounds deeper and lower-pitched in
  5. I heard this on the radio and thought I should post it here! I really enjoyed them! Both talks touch on related aspects of vocal training, vocal science, and vocal "ideology." Hearing Color https://ideas.ted.com/the-sound-of-color-neil-harbissons-talk-visualized/ Synthetic Voices https://www.ted.com/talks/rupal_patel_synthetic_voices_as_unique_as_fingerprints?utm_campaign=tedspread&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare
  6. This is a new forum, for which I have been asked to be available as an expert. I'd like to begin by asking for your opinions on the awareness of overtone singing and throat singing today. We all know it has been around in the west for quite a long time, but the rest of the world has been very slow in coming to know about it, much less understand it. Recently, one of my colleagues, Austrian Anna Maria Hefele posted a brief demonstration of polyphonic overtone singing on Youtube. (Meaning a moving fundamental, not simply a drone). She is quite skilled at it. It very quickly reached over 7 mill
  7. I use a digital recorder that records the effects in real time while recording. With this recorder I cannot add effects after the track is laid down other than a master effect which is applied to all tracks. I usually check for decent sounding preset for my microphone before recording and use headphones. My questions are.....How much does this effect the initial sound being produced by you the singer. And can it interfere with overall voice production? An example would be....Does too much Bass in the EQ lead to a higher larynx to compensate for the sound and vice versa, too much
  8. The vocal geek mind took over when I started watching this video of Joni back in '79 singing, "Goodbye Porkpie Hat." I've always been a fan of Joni and thinks she's a beautiful woman! I couldn't help but notice those big beautiful front teeth and I thought, "it's almost like she would never have to be reminded to keep a "wide" embochure (as most of us so easily forget to maintain when singing). Her consistent teeth bearing embouchure seems like the perfect "E.Q. balance" to her warm (larynx lowered) alto-ish tamber. Then, as I watched her sing (the camera angle is such as to give ju
  9. Dear all, It has been a while that I have visited this forum. I have been very busy with my studies—having completed my BA in Musicology and currently finalising my MA in Applied Musicology. I did keep on working on my singing, however. Yesterday, “The Music of the Night,” a song that I auditioned with at the Conservatory of Rotterdam over a decade ago and that I had used for my singing lessons with many different teachers, was one I had never actually performed—until now! Indeed, there appears to be balancing issues with volume between me and the piano. On the other hand, I asked se
  10. I had mentioned this singer "Chris Stapleton" in another thread. Thought I'd share this video/song he recently published. I was really struck by the numerous examples of solid vocal athleticism that arise in this performance. I try not to overanalyze every good vocal too often, cuz sometimes I loose the "soul" of the song in my ear from all of the deconstruction I use to understand the vocal. Couldn't resist on this one. Still "hearing the soul" to date. I've tagged all the key words that I believe I recognize "done well" in this composition. Personally, I'm most impressed with his
  11. Yo! All my fellow singing geeks! I came across the article I've linked here (below video). I thought it is was very well written (a quick read), and includes a couple comments by Justin Stoney (coach most of us probably know from Youtube). I have read & posted in our "techniques" forum regarding so called "Natural Singers," percentages of the population who are or are not, training, and etc. Hope this helps lend some clarity to the matter(s). article - Singing Tips: Have A Certain Skull Shape, And Other Science Behind Carrying A Tune http://www.m
  12. This is a song I've been having my more advanced students study and work through. The guy has impecable technique through most, if not all, of the song. I usually use this as a great song for practicing tuning the formant when they get tired of going through the exercises. He rides the line between light-mass head voice and full voice all the way to belting, all the while keeping great placement. As some of you know, when you're tuned well (especially in head voice), adding in chest voice muscles, dampening, twang, distortion, and just about any other sound color is much more simple. This song
  13. Lately I have been lurking on the forums more than answering questions. I am finding that a lot of the questions that are being asked can be answered very simply but are being answered very wordy and creating confusion. I want to say that maybe I was lucky to study with who I studied and study with and also how I made my career singing for a living. It wasn't easy but I put a lot of work into my voice many many years 20 + and many years on the road away from an apt whether it be in NYC, CA, ATL,CHICAGO, CT.. I blew out my voice many times and studied with whomever I could never onc
  14. 1 download

    With over 25 years of experience, John Henny is regarded as a leading vocal coach in the music industry and as a true teacher of teachers. John’s techniques not only keep the voice healthy, they also improve the overall sound, help eliminate cracks in the voice and extend the singer’s range allowing the singer to express themselves vocally without limitation. John Henny has lectured at prestigious colleges and institutes such as USC, Paul McCartney’s Liverpool Institute of the Arts and The Academy of Contemporary Music in England. He is also a Master Teacher for vocal coaches all over
    Free
  15. 4 downloads

    Ingo R. Titze is a vocal scientist and executive director of the National Center for Voice and Speech at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. He is a professor at the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Iowa and has written several books relating to the human voice. He is considered to be one of the world's leading experts on vocal research. Dr. Ingo Titze www.NCVS.org
    Free
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    Robert Edwin has gained international recognition as a singer, songwriter, teacher, and author. He has sung Bach cantatas in church cathedrals and rock songs in Greenwich Village, New York coffeehouses, recorded for Avant Garde and Fortress Records, and toured extensively throughout the United States and abroad. He has performed in New York City’s Carnegie Hall, Town Hall, and Radio City Music Hall, and has appeared with such outstanding artists as opera star Jerome Hines, jazz legend Duke Ellington, and famed actor/director Ossie Davis. His TV and radio credits include several NBC Christmas s
    Free
  17. 6 downloads

    Robert Lunte is the owner founder of the The Vocalist Studio International www.TheVocalistStudio.com, an Internationally recognized voice training school for extreme singing vocal techniques and advanced vocal instruction. Robert is also the author and producer of the critically acclaimed vocal instruction training system, “The Four Pillars of Singing”. TVS techniques are shared around the world by voice teachers as part of the TVS International Certified Instructor Program, which is one of the fastest growing vocal organizations of highly trained voice coaches in the world today. Robert
    Free
  18. 1 download

    Robert Thayer Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS is the Executive director of The Voice Foundation. The World's leading association for research regarding the human voice. He is also professor and chair, at the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and senior associate dean for clinical academic specialties, Drexel University College of Medicine. He is also adjunct professor in the Departments of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at Thomas Jefferson University, the University of Pennsylvania and Temple University, and is on the faculty of the Academy of Vocal Arts. He served as conduc
    Free
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    Steve Fraser is a noted expert on vowel modification, phonetics and formants for singing. Mr. Fraser is a recognized expert in the analysis of spectrograph analysis of singing. A spectrogram is a a time-varying spectral representation (forming an image) that shows how the spectral density of a signal varies with time. In the field of Time-Frequency Signal Processing, it is one of the most popular quadratic Time-Frequency Distribution that represents a signal in a joint time-frequency domain and that has the property of being positive. Mr. Fraser has a Bachelor’s in Vocal Music Education f
    Free
  20. I was pondering these metaphors and thought I'd see if I could expand it some. Let me know how you see it! Easel is the pedagogy/coach Canvas is the formants Paint is the phonation Colors are the acoustic qualities & vocal modes Brushes are the intrinsic muscular configurations & appoggio Frame is the musical context/setting (band, choir, acapella, singer w/ instrument, musical, etc.) Lyrics are the finished image Lighting (as in a gallery) is amplification & vocal effects
  21. Hey guys! I have been thinking about what is physically different inside when someone has a more accentuated F1 ( shouty/yell quality ), versus someone that doesn't have a big difference between his "high chest" shouty range and his "mix" or above his bridge point. Is this what makes voices more "dramatic", "heroic", "lyrical" ? What is this acoustic space, where is it ? Does it have a distinct sound or participation in the high range, even if you are out of F1? Do Baritones have bigger Overdrive/Yelly sound than lighter voices? So these are several questions I've asked myself, do y
  22. A GREAT BOOK ON THE ACOUSTICS OF SINGING I just had a great discussion with Ken Bozeman, the author of the book, "Practical Vocal Acoustics - Pedagogic Applications for Teachers & Singers". We talked a lot about how the CT and TA relate to each other and specifically, what they are doing inside of contemporary belt voice. I think I am lot more clear on CT/TA involvement now and "get it". I also have this book guys. It talks a lot about the acoustics of singing, but is practical and not too difficult to follow. It comes with a CD and a web site you can check into with supporting materials.
  23. Hi! A little background: I have trained my vocals with a college instructor for roughly four years, I haven't had a lesson in nearly two. The reason I say this is because I had posted on Yahoo forums only to be lectured without constructive criticism by someone who had the information I was asking about only because I was hoping someone would provide it free of charge. I am a student. I am also broke. Whenever I can afford to, I will reinvest in a vocal coach because I am aware that not having one has lead me to developing bad habits. She pretty much told me I shouldn't sing at all without y
  24. Introduction In the male voice lower and mid ranges, (what has been traditionally called the "chest voice"), the harmonic structure of the sung tone contains many partials - harmonics, which fit nicely into the pattern of resonances for any particular vowel chosen. Throughout this range, the strong, lower harmonics are reinforced by the first vowel resonance corresponding with Formant 1, (F1), midrange harmonics are reinforced by the second vowel resonance from Formant 2 (F2), and higher harmonics are emphasized by the higher "twang" or "singer's" formant resonances. The combination o
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