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Found 479 results

  1. Hi all, apologies for the length of this. I’m a male in my mid 30’s, nearly zero music / singing / performing experience as a youngster. I Decided to take up guitar lessons a couple of years ago, (did a few at 7, gave up) still going, managed to get to grade 3. I’ve never really accompanied my playing with singing (guitar teacher suggested it early on when playing acoustic , I was horrified of the thought of doing that in front of him, aside from the difficulty of multi tasking etc) probably a big reason why I changed to electric. I downloaded a singing course last year and did that for a bit, though a couple of months ago I decided to take some singing lessons even though I’m shy so its a pretty big deal for me. I thought it could help with my musical ear and understanding of theory etc which are novice level, I also have been messing around on a keyboard for that purpose. I’ve always hated my speaking voice as its monotone and I think that shows through with my vocal tone. I’ve had about 8 lessons and I have improved a bit with scales, stretched my range somewhat, improved vocal break etc and my teacher just said she thinks I have a tenor range which I was surprised by as I assumed I’d be a baritone. I know that range doesn’t mean much if you don’t sound good, which is where my point is heading, ..my singing tone just sounds very boring, even if I’m hitting the correct notes, it just sounds dull, boring, uninteresting. Is it my physical makeup the reason for my general sound and if so is there any point in proceeding with practice if this is something that cannot be changed?? I mean I could spend a few years practicing, maybe get good enough to be in a band guitar wise (bit of a pipe dream) and then people would be like jesus with the sound of your voice we wouldn’t even want you to do backing vocals!
  2. I’ve been very fascinated by male singers who can sing very high notes for the typical male singer. There are two singers in particular who are lead vocalist in a couple of I find very unique in their vocal style because of their range and vocal fry? It’s honestly too weird to describe. The two singers are Anthony Green (solo artist and Circa Survive) and Tilian Pearson. What I’d like to know is how are they singing like this ? Is this something learned or some sort of difference in their vocal cords? I know that sounds crazy but it sounds so destructive but they have both been singing like this professionally for 15 years and still going strong with the same range and vocal style. Examples: Anthony Green - Tilian Pearson -
  3. Here there is Too good at Goodbyes sang by me i want to know if i sung the pre chorus note in chest voice or in mixed voice please let me know master.mp4
  4. I'm a Male 17 year old with a range of F#2-A#4(D5 in mixed voice) am I Baritone or tenor?
  5. Hello, I'm not used to using my head voice at all and was hoping for some feedback on this. Many thanks! https://soundcloud.com/user-426295887/one-fine-day-shirelles-cover-by-paulina-butterfly
  6. https://soundcloud.com/user-661844416/time-waits-for-no-one-cover This is one of my favorite Freddie songs. I thought I'd do a little more softer songs that required more chest to head transitions and stuff. It's quite the emotional song. Tell me what you think. And what I can improve. Hope you enjoy!
  7. https://vocaroo.com/i/s1nO8aAPzOMx I have been practicing but I still don't like the sound what should I do to make it sound better.
  8. What caught my attention here was the statement that modern day tenors tend to emphasize the SIXTH as the dominant harmonic. I recall an argument in which someone was trying to convince me that asymmetric vocal fold closure (due to high closed quotient) was critical for full projection, and that that is why the THIRD and FIFTH harmonic are dominant. Well, that is not consistent with what we have here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzGITC_PRWw (I am aware that Livigni has done a video on the "importance of" the closed quotient, but I still think that the science behind it is shaky.)
  9. South African Artist Anna Wolf Wins Prestigious Grand Prize in 2019 Unsigned Only Music Competition Garth Hudson (The Band), Taj Mahal, Aimee Mann, O.A.R., Sanctus Real, Bow Wow, Boney James, Ruthie Foster, and Robert Smith (The Cure) Among Judges September 4, 2019 - -The Unsigned Only Music Competition is pleased to announce its 2019 winners. Unsigned Only is open to all artists who are unsigned to a major record label and gives artists exposure, recognition, and validation for their artistry. A total of $150,000 in cash and prizes is awarded to 38 winners, including an overall Grand Prize winner and a First and Second Place winner in each category. An additional group of Honorable Mentions were also selected. Over the years Unsigned Only has become an important source for discovering new talent. Since its inception in 2012, five Grand Prize winners have been signed to record labels. For the first time in Unsigned Only’s history, the 2019 Grand Prize is awarded to a South African artist, Anna Wolf, for the song “Believer.” Wolf beat out almost 6,000 entries from more than 100 countries to be named the Grand Prize winner. Wolf is truly a compelling and rare artist – a hypnotic performer with passion and style, a singer with hauntingly beautiful vocals, and a songwriter with depth and vulnerability. The winning song, “Believer,” is a powerful track, inspired by Wolf’s desire to break the silence about domestic violence and serves as a personal refusal to become the victim of her circumstance. "I feel such gratitude for this honour,” said Anna Wolf. “The message of ‘Believer” is burnt into every fibre of my being: to let go of expectations, to face my own vulnerabilities and to always keep faith that tomorrow will be the day I get to share my music with the world.” Born in Pretoria, South Africa, Wolf (formerly known as Tailor) has had a celebrated career, amassing hit singles, sold-out shows, South African Music Awards nominations, and a legion of dedicated fans. In 2018, she moved to London, where one night she took her guitar to the bathtub and recorded herself performing “Believer” on her cell phone by stomping her feet against the tub. She sent the demo to producer Pete Boxta Martin, (Missy Elliot, Jessie J, Sugababes), who ended up recording the song. You can still hear some of the noise from the bathtub in the final mix. Apple Music selected the song for four playlists (including Best of the Week, Future Hits, Jump Start and The A-list Alternative) and gave the music video a worldwide release as an exclusive premiere on their platform. More recently, Wolf has released the follow-up single, “Silence,” to acclaimed reviews, dedicating the song to her fans she calls “wolves.” “Anna Wolf is such a phenomenal artist,” said UO founders, Candace Avery and Jim Morgan. “She has so much passion and authenticity, and she needs to be heard. She is an artist who is not afraid to tackle difficult issues and make you feel emotion, and she is one of the most magnetic and inspiring artists we have ever come across.” In addition to winning $20,000 in cash (US) and $40,000 (US) in merchandise and services, Wolf also receives one-on-one mentoring from a group of upper-echelon music industry executives, including: Pete Ganbarg (President of A&R, Atlantic Records); Nick Haussling (Senior VP of A&R, Warner Records); Liz Cohen (A&R, RCA Records); Kim Stephens (President, Forward Entertainment / A&R, Lava Records); David Silbaugh (Talent Buyer, Summerfest); Brinson Strickland (President, Collective Artist Management); and Kristyn Ciani (Talent Buyer, C3 Presents). The complete panel of 2019 judges includes: Aimee Mann; Garth Hudson (The Band); Taj Mahal; Sanctus Real; Bow Wow; Robert Smith (The Cure); The Secret Sisters; Boney James; Gareth Emery; O.A.R.; Janiva Magness; Fred Hersch; Francesca Battistelli; Frank Foster; Aaron Shust; Toots Hibbert (Toots and the Maytals); Ruthie Foster; Tinariwen; Craig Campbell; JD McPherson; Carter Burwell; Zbigniew Preisner; Russ Landau; Josh Jackson (Co-Founder and Editor-In-Chief, Paste Magazine); Anthony DeCurtis (Contributing Editor, Rolling Stone); Mac Randall (Editor, JazzTimes); Marcos Juarez (Head of Latin Music, Pandora); David Sikorski (Senior Editor, EARMILK Media INC.); Lyndsey Parker (Managing Editor, Yahoo Music); Kevin McNeese (President, NewReleaseToday); Art Tipaldi (Editor, Blues Music Magazine); Nigel J. Farmer (Editor-In-Chief, Jazz In Europe); John Dibiase (President, Jesus Freak Hideout); David Silbaugh (Talent Buyer, Summerfest); Angel Romero (Founder / Sr. Editor, World Music Central); Brandon Chitwood (Assistant Director, EDM Joy); Enrique Santos (Chairman / Chief Creative Officer, iHeart Latino); Chad Jensen (Artist Manager, Jensen Artist Management); Brinson Strickland (President, Collective Music Nashville); Deborah Klein (JV Partner and Artist Manager, Primary Wave Entertainment); Kristyn Ciani (Talent Buyer, C3 Presents / Lollapalooza, Austin City Limits, Shaky Knees); Evan Stein (Owner, Experience Music Group); James Kempner (Owner, JMK Connections); Jennifer Taunton (Music Supervisor, Level Two Music); Jessica Cole (Founder / President, Lyric House); and Sheryl Louis (Artist Manager, CSM Management). Unsigned Only is sponsored by Celebrity Access; Eventric; Hybrid Studios; Lurssen Mastering; Merch Cat; Musicians Institute; Musician Wellness; Pro Tour Nutrition; Radio Airplay; Shubb Capos; Symphonic Distribution; The Music Business Registry; and Vocal Eze. Unsigned Only is now accepting entries for the 2020 competition. More information can be found at: https://www.unsignedonly.com. To hear the winning songs, download low-res photos, and view the complete list of winners, go to: https://www.unsignedonly.com/winners For high-res photos, please contact Candace Avery at press@unsignedonly.com. ### The complete list of 2019 Unsigned Only winners is as follows: Grand Prize Anna Wolf (Pretoria, South Africa) – “Believer” AAA (Adult Album Alternative) First Place Adrian Chalifour (Victoria, BC, Canada) – “Head Down Heart Up” Second Place Whitefield (Werrington County, NSW, Australia) – “Ivy” Adult Contemporary (AC) First Place Madison Olds (Kamloops, BC, Canada) – “Thank You” Second Place CAEZAR (Gloucester, GLR, England) – “Hold On” Americana First Place Kenny Foster (Joplin, MO, USA) – “Wood & Steel” Second Place Roger Street Friedman (New York, NY, USA) – “Everyday” Blues First Place Layla Zoe (Victoria, BC, Canada) – “The Deeper They Bury Me” Second Place Teresa James And The Rhythm Tramps (Canyon Country, CA, USA) – “Forgetting You” Christian First Place Avery Blank (Sedgwick, KS, USA) – “Not Over” Second Place Francesca Ani (Tampa, FL, USA) – “Heart On Fire” Country First Place Tyler Dial (Phoenix, AZ, USA) – “Damn, Denver” Second Place Kaylee Bell (Waimate, CT, New Zealand) – “Keith” EDM First Place Krane (Los Angeles, CA, USA) – “Movin” Second Place Friendzone (Salt Lake City, UT, USA) – “Neighbors” Folk/Singer-Songwriter First Place Tom Freund (Venice, CA, USA) – “Freezer Burn” Second Place Clinton Clegg (Pittsburgh, PA, USA) – “Spain” Instrumental First Place Roman Smirnov (Toronto, ON, Canada) – “Kuwaka” Second Place Symphonex Orchestra (Charlestown, RI, USA) – “Dreams In Bloom - The Encounter” Jazz First Place Chico Pinheiro (Sao Paulo, Brazil) – “Flor de Fogo” Second Place Chris Parker (Port Jervis, NY, USA) – “The Chimney” Latin First Place Gio Cadario (Santa Cruz, Bolivia) – “Devuelveme” Second Place Teff (Caracas, Venezuela) – “Te Equivocaste” Pop/Top 40 First Place Cray (Norway) – “Monkey Wants Banana” Second Place Tia P (Inglewood, CA, USA) – “Come Together” R&B/Hip-Hop First Place Alexander Lewis (Los Angeles, CA, USA) – “Pearl Magnolia” Second Place Coco Jones (Lebanon, TN, USA) – “Just My Luck” Rock First Place Fink Tree (Poznan, Poland) – “Love Somebody” Second Place Dogtooth (Glasgow, Scotland) – “Trying To Save You” Screen Shot First Place Bryan Elijah Smith (Dayton, VA, USA) – “In Through The Dark” Second Place Big Little Lions (Royston, BC, Canada) – “Find Your Tribe” Teen First Place Carolyn Hao (Toronto, ON, Canada) – “Losing Count” Second Place Camryn Quinlan (Sayville, NY, USA) – “Monsters” Vocal Performance First Place Rhia (Melbourne, VIC, Australia) – “Crystalline” Second Place Pedro Barbosa (Maputo, Mozambique) – “Crazy Love Is” World Music First Place OYME (Moscow, Russia) – “Vaya” Second Place Kidum Kibido And Boda Boda (Bujumbura, Burundi) – “Nipe Nguvu” Fandemonium Winner (winner selected by online public vote) Corvyx (Staten Island, NY, USA) – “Alive” Grand Slam Promotion Winners Week 1 – Get Exposed Online With Digital Distribution and Promotion Sara (Belgrade, Serbia) – "Player Of Mine” Week 2 – Get Licensed With Your Music Charlie Grant (Totnes, DVN, England) – “Black Lines” Week 3 – Get Published With Your Songs Goodnight, Sunrise (Toronto, ON, Canada) – "WVV” Week 4 – Get Paid For Your Music Dylan Holton (Ottawa, ON, Canada) – "I Used To” Win Some Love Promotion Winners First Place: Kat Beck (North Vancouver, BC, Canada) – “Hooked On Your Love” Second Place: Maham Suhail (Lahore, Pakistan) – "Pauna” Third Place: Angus Brill Reed (Adelaide, SA, Australia) – “Be You” Video Only Promotion Winners Professional Video Winner Tia P (Inglewood, CA, USA) – “Come Together” Homemade Video Winner Matt Ellis (Sydney, NSW, Australia) - “Some People" To view the list of Honorable Mentions, please go to: https://www.unsignedonly.com/winners
  10. Hi, i always wondering my vocal fach. My speaking voice sounds heavy and dopey but in tenor tessitura. I'm very insecure about my voice sounds weird in others ear. But, i'm very love to sing, i can't stop doing this. This is my voice sample This song is easier for me because alot of headvoice. https://soundcloud.com/fadelsawi/shes-gone-moris-morty-monty And, this one is harder because i need to stretch my chest up to A4 (my second passaggio). https://soundcloud.com/fadelsawi/risalah-hati-monty
  11. Hi. I am really bored being Baritone. I am not sure i'm a Baritone or Not. But i have totally un-trained voice and i have also, fry voice problem by Acidic reflux. I have damaged vocal cords but still i can sing. I don't know i have to chance to become Lyric tenor? Or i am a tenor or baritone? When my voice health before, my vocal range: Full chest: E2 (Very weak and force low note) up to A4-B4 and with force alot C5 Mixed chest: I don't know this technique so i don't know. Falsetto: Max note G5 i only know (But screaming) (And my falsetto is airy and dramatic sounds like very Mickey mouse tone) Head voice: Very weak but max note C5 probably. Here is my some cover tests: This recording when my voice is health... (Old a little bit)
  12. Whenever i listen to a (*auto edit*) baritone i just want to fall asleep. Baritone singing sounds so boring. It's the biggest curse ever. God gave you a great deep voice yet you can't (*auto edit*) use it for singing. I would sacrifice my whole family for a tenor singing voice and i'm not exaggerating. Tenor voices sound (*auto edit*) amazing. Super interesting. My baritone voice sounds like shit. Singing a D4 is hard for me. I can't believe. Can reach G5 in falsetto but it means nothing. I want to be able to (*auto edit*) reach it in chest voice. Might kill myself i'm serious.
  13. DEFINITIVE OPERA TECHNIQUE for all styles of singing- This is one of the most renowned opera singers in the world. He has started a new online method of singing, teaching, and interpreting voice. The technique is operatic but is universally based for all genres of singing including crossover, musical theater and popular styles. Unlock access to the traditional Italian bel canto method of singing based on historical techniques. The lessons are designed to be highly concentrated to help you learn and teach as efficiently as possible, and to be a point of reference both at the beginning of your studies and throughout your career.
  14. Here is a topic I have always thought was interesting. Would love to hear people's input on this. Maybe @Pcastagner might have some interesting things to share here. Thoughts Phillip?...
  15. Years ago this WAS the best forum for singers and teachers. Those wishing to learn and those willing to help and those who just want to discuss their thoughts on singing and training.. There is still a need for this forum and a community to belong to and interact with. I was here when the community was thriving and when things declined. There are two main issues that singers have to deal with. Egos and rejection. The thoughts of "Am I good enough?" and "Who has the right to tell me I am not good enough". No one has the right to tell you that you are not good enough. But, everyone does have a right to their opinion, and opinions differ. Some people will have a more pleasant starting sound than other people(according to "Popular" opinion) and people have different issues vocally to deal with. Not to mention the different purposes for wanting to improve and the different applications. So, when you ask "Am I good enough?" You will get opinions that you may not like and you may get opinions that would make you believe there is no improvement needed. The FACT is that your voice is constantly changing and keeping up with the changes and making improvements takes work and practice. Any state that your voice is in right now can and will change with time and the way you choose to develope. The problem arose with people arguing opinions as facts. Just because you like or dislike something or believe something does not make it a fact or correct. Letting other people express their opinion without challenging it will give yourself different ways to deal with issues that you may have with your own development. To that extent and also, Giving advice and expressing your own opinion will give you insights on how you yourself feel about your development and other ways and things you can do to improve your own vocal skills. Back to the topic of this post: Do you want to continue with this forum and give and receive advice and engage in conversations about vocal improvement, heath and how things work for vocalists and why they work or do not? YOU, who or whom ever you are, need to take part for this forum to continue and grow and be great again.
  16. Something I have been thinking on lately. I really see good basic, supported, open throat singing as the real basis for good rock singing. I see a guy like Paul Rodgers being almost the ideal base model. Learn that base and THEN add on or go into other directions such as Plant/Cornell As far as actual difficulty or skill level of various classic rock/metal singers, I see it sort of as follows starting from "easiest" to hardest: (of course, ALL of these guys are great and all of it is hard to get close to!) Paul Rogers-----> Robert Plant, Chris Cornell, Rob Halford, Geoff Tate-----> Bruce Dickinson, Dio My reasoning: Paul Rogers has a great tone and in general he "just sings". He doesnt go out of his way to do anything fancy or overly impressive, yet he does sing with a nice tone through a decent range Plant, Cornell, Halford, Tate. These guys are more varied and may generally have a higher tessitura etc, but some of it isnt THAT hard to sing because it gets into a released type of headvoice sound. Some if it can be emulated without a ton of physical effort Dickinson/Dio. Okay, these guys can be ridiculously hard to emulate. IMO you have to actually have the strength built to sing like these guys. ESPECIALLY Dio. This is like bench pressing 315 lbs. Reading a book or finding a "trick" wont get you to bench 315. You have to put in the time and work up to it ITS HARD TO FIND DECENT COVERS OF DIO, EVEN FROM OTHER PROS!!! That says a lot Some of Dios songs are in a higher range than what u might think....yet he still has that beefiness and somewhat "round" tone. You can tell there is a lot of support. Yet when u see him on live clips it doesnt seem that hard for him. Of course by the time any of us heard of him he was at least up into his 30s with a lot of mileage under his belt so he had that technique and strength down solid So that leads me to this video where the guy shows 2 approaches to singing "Rainbow in the Dark" To my ears, the first version is way closer to Dio. The 2nd version isnt that close So this is the hard part. Can one get that sound WITHOUT the really strong supported style?? Like the guy in the vid said, he was exhausted by the time he got to the 2nd verse etc. Is it then just a matter of one having to build that strength over time?? Here are a couple of covers by guys that do GREAT covers....but they dont get that close to Dio IMO. to my ear, both of these are a little "lighter" than Dio. So therein lies the dilemma. How to get that powerful compressed sound yet stay sort of "round" yet also still be light enough to sing into decent higher range?? Even good old Ken, who promotes strongly supported singing etc....sounds rather strained while attempting the Dio stuff. Doesnt really sound like Dio at all and this guy. Great singer, huge range etc. 2.4 million subs. Doesnt sound anything like Dio though Felipe gets pretty close, which is impressive since he has to fight his natural accent and sing a second language etc. Felipe's tone is pretty warm generally too AFAIK Jorn is about as close as ive heard and even then there are some slight differences. Jorn seems a tiny bit scratchier whereas Dio could be really clean while still sounding huge So was Dio just a mutant or did he just build great strength and control over time? here he is live. assuming this vocal is indeed live lol Im seeing him using decent support and lots of resonance. In other words it seems as if he is pushing a lot of air up with a generally open throat....letting that air find good resonance up in the head etc, as opposed to physically trying to squeeze with the throat. of course I may be totally wrong lol His speaking voice already had that sort of warm round tone to it so maybe he just got lucky and learned to sing with power with his natural round tone Anyone have any ideas or want to discuss?? Peace, JJ
  17. I have been playing music the last few months with a friend who was former leader in a band I was in years ago. He started doing a solo act and uses a computer with backing tracks that he recorded, some he played all the instruments and some which were downloaded. I have used a drum machine before in other instances where their are only 2 band members so I realize that having some kind of backing track can be beneficial. All the music is already there and even the lead singing and harmonies. A mixer is used to add whatever instruments and vocals we are providing at the time to the prerecorded tracks. He has been told that many bands do this but it seems somewhat wrong to me. I could understand maybe having drums, rhythm guitar and Bass prerecorded for a 2 man band and providing Lead guitar, extra rhythm guitar fills and vocals live, but having everything prerecorded and playing along with it? What are your thoughts? Is this a common practice and I am just living in the past and need to get with the times? My own thoughts are to drop the prerecorded cuts and do everything live with just the two guitars or Bass and guitar. Then you would be judged on your own merits not on recorded music that never changes from day to day.
  18. I've been learning to sing and play and tap dance lol https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHjn6dck9Fs
  19. Hey guys. So I've been singing for some years now. I'm classicaly trained, theoretically a tenor, but I could never manage to understand and make the adjustments to go higher than F4 without breaking into M2 or straining a lot. Last year I started reading a lot about voice physiology and learning contemporary singing technique. Now I can go sometimes even up to G5 (not a pretty singable tone yet, but it's there). From Bb4 up I can somehow manage a lighter sound that doesn't sound like M2, but between E4 and A4 I can only do full-on belting or something lighter but with a lot of constriction (arytenoids I guess). I'm trying to achieve a lighter and freer M1 (mixed?) sound in that range, and so I've been reading and watching many YouTube videos on that, but I'm very confused with the way scientists and vocal coaches differently name the registers and stuff, so it's being hard to clearly understand what they mean and choose a way to approach the matter. I have to say that I personally think the names Chest, Head and Mixed Voice are terrible and extremely misleading, and they did nothing but prevent me from moving forward. Understanding the vibratory mechanisms and the filter/resonance adjustments is what really is helping me evolve. And although I understand a lot of people don't benefit from scientific explanations, it's really works for me. From what I understand, SCIENTIFICALLY mixed voice can be either: 1. M1 with less vocalis contraction and more nasal airflow/rhinopharyngeal resonance, as used by man and women in contemporary music and by men in high notes in classical. 2. M2 with more rhinopharyngeal resonance and twang in the higher range in contemporary singing. 3. M2 with more rhinopharyngeal resonance in the female first passaggio in classical. And head voice can refer to: 1. any sound in M2 2. only M2 with cartilaginous adduction Now I'm really confused with how vocal coaches use the terms. For me, the sound of what many demonstrate as Head voice - specially those who don't count falsetto as Head voice - is not M2 at all, but rather my first description of Mixed voice (less compressed M1 with rhinopharyngeal resonance). Which makes me think, when they say head voice they are referring mainly to head resonance (rhinopharynx) and not to the vibratory mechanism M2. So although many exercises for bridging/mixing/blending DO go from M1 to M2, and this is of course also used in actual singing, the "bridging" that happens most of the time in the mid-high range is simply the adjustments to go from M1 with oral resonance to M1 with nasal resonance, to allow the laryngeal tilt, less compression and lower subglottal pressure without breaking into M2. I'm still beginning in the science stuff, does anyone with more knowledge in that area agrees, disagrees or have any other thoughts on the subject and on how I could approach a softer sound between E4 and A4?
  20. So now that I am in full swing back to singing professionally between my cover band and getting back to session singing and staff writing the demands on my voice are heavier then they have been in 20 years. Especially in the band where we are doing a lot of R&B, Top 40, dance and disco. A couple of things I have realized for myself living now on the frontline of the reality of singing is that training my voice as a rock singer for all these years did some great stuff but I feel I neglected a lower bridge and lower falsetto, 2 things that are absolutely paramount with that style that aren't really that important when you're a slammin rock singer and can actually be a detriment because it can make you sound 'unauthentic'. But for all this Pharrell, Kool and the Gang, Cupid, Bruno Mars etc.. it is absolutely critical to have, not only for stylish reason but so that you can sing 50 songs every night while dancing. It all came to a head about a week and half ago, my voice felt exhausted. I was getting gassed just talking. Took a few days off, also went to the ENT to get scoped and everything is perfect looking so it's just muscular. So I started to really dig into what was going on with me and where I could improve. I started reading, watching videos, pulled out all my old workout CDs etc.. Also started back training with a few different coaches and have really learned a lot about myself and my voice the past week or so. Voice is feeling and sounding way better. So here are some of my epiphanies:    1. I need to put time in everyday working my lower blend, head voice, falsetto and lower falsetto. Both with the feeling higher in the head and more in the mask. I've been studying with Johanna Boberg who is one of the absolute most incredible R&B singers and sings full-time in a working band. She has really helped me to start to identify what's going on. She's also really boosted my confidence by appreciating my voice.   2. I need to stay diligent everyday with the right life habits; eating a healthy non-acid reflux causing diet, not eating 2 hours before bed, using  humidifier at night, not drinking cold water, long hot showers, doing vitamins & throat gargle, throat coat tea. I also ordered a oil diffuser humidifier for my studio.    3. Exercise and stretching; My buddy Jaime ran through all his vocal enhancing stretches with me this week and I have been doing them along with a little passive yoga and working out. Huge difference.   Anyway, these are some of what I am doing if anyone has some cool tricks they want to ad that be great. I am more into singing now then ever in my life and I am actually enjoying being serious about singing again. That was one of the things that kept me from wanting to sing in a band again because I just wasn't willing to do the right thing, I always knew what it took to sing full-time and just didn't want to do it but now I do and I am enjoying it. No more slacker s**t. A few companies that I have publishing deals with have been asking for me to release something new for the past few years and I just balked, I felt I didn't have anything new to say. That's gonna change after this transformation. I will definitely do a new video/audio. Probably not a book though.    Here are a couple of videos I have been enjoying to watch and are resonating with me.    
  21. Hello I am having real trouble finding my falsetto, I can't make that effortless sound, it is always strained. I was always able to make a voice that I thought was falsetto, but I got to the conclusion that is flageolet instead. I got really used to it and it is relaxed, and really sounds like falsetto, but I think it isn't falsetto mainly because: - It isn't connected to chest voice. I know sometimes it's difficult to connect head and chest voice, but this is extremely disconnected, it is a different world. - I am able to transition smoothly from whistle to this flageolet. Not trying hard at all, just lowering the pitch from whistle, I end up in this voice. Demo: https://instaud.io/3rzk So, an example of this strained 'falsetto', in a moment with the voice quite tired (so that the strain is noticeable): https://instaud.io/3rzm Same song, in flageolet (I know it sounds a lot like a falsetto):https://instaud.io/3rzd An example of a song, in falsetto, that sounded better, in a moment my voice wasn't that tired: https://instaud.io/3rzf (Yes, I like Ed Sheeran XD). This is as close to a relaxed falsetto that I can get. So, any advice on how to find that relaxed falsetto? Maybe I am still unable to do it because I have those muscles untrained? I've tried yawning, making the sound of an owl, or Mickey Mouse's voice... Everything is strained. Any advice, or exercise? Thank you in advance Whistle to flageolet.mp3 Strained falsetto.mp3 Flageolet.mp3
  22. Hi! I'm a 21 years old male and have I think a low baritone voice. When I try to go through my entire vocal range this is what I feel happens: I start of in my chest voice and around A3-D4 my voice flips or kind of transitions into a very breathy head voice, I think it's falsetto. Then at around C5-E5 my voice stops and if i try to push more it's just air and no sound. I know I have what feels like another "register" that I sometimes can get into, that dosen't feel as breathy that spans from around F#5-C6 and up to F6 on good days. But it's really hard for me to get into this "register". I'll attach a sound file where I do lip rolls and in the first one I manage to get into this "voice", up to a A5, where in the others it's the same as usual. Anyone that struggles with the same and/or have any tips about this? liproll.mp3 didn't work with soundcloud link :/
  23. Hello, I don’t know whether I’ll get a reply on this. I’m sophie and this is me singing best part by H.E.R, it would be appreciated if you could give feedback and help me to improve. I’ve never had a vocal coach before and I’m 15 so if it’s bad very sorry 7D6EABB1-3395-4826-A0C4-98505AEBE009.MP4