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Found 86 results

  1. Hi guys, I'm 31 years old. I've always been bad at singing, but I'd like to see if I can become pleasant to listen to-- at least a little. I can play music by ear on a few instruments, so I'd like to think I can discern my own pitch. So where do I start? What's the plan?? Thanks, Mike
  2. Hi. I'm in need of help and good advice. After an hour or less of singing during my solo practice sessions or band rehearsals, my voice gets too airy. A sort of airy tone gets mixed with my voice, which is due to vocal strain. I'm attaching samples of my fresh voice and after 1 hour so you can compare. The airiness is most audible in single note "Ah". I may be too picky about this, but I want to know is this normal after an hour or what? I want to be able to sing with my clear voice during the whole show. I would appreciate very much if anyone can give a me good advice on how to avoid or at least minimize this. Thank you. 1- fresh voice.mp3 2- after 1 hour.mp3
  3. Hey, lately I started to sing covers but I have a big problem. I am not a prof. singer and I have no clue of notes. How do I know in whitch note I should sing like if I sing a Camila Cabello song for example "Crying in the Club" in whitch note should I start to sing where can I go, whitch note shouldn't i sing.
  4. Two E4s: https://vocaroo.com/i/s0lOuXELfdDq https://vocaroo.com/i/s19x5gz15FLi I have some issues with tongue tension which I want to not have. That's hard lol I'm a lower placed baritone and I'm comfortable in the range of G2~Eb4/E4~B4 (in head voice) My tongue often blocks the back of my throat, what can I do to keep my throat open and free ? Help me please. Is my tongue well placed in those two E4s ?
  5. Hi, whenever I am warming up or sing I reach a point where I can't sing low notes anymore. Is this normal? If not is there a way to prevent this? Because it's very annoying when I'm trying to sing a song. Btw I'm terrible at singing so maybe I need some kind of technique to stop this? I'd appreciate tips on stopping this (if possible) and I would also appreciate it if you had any tips for a terrible beginning singer. Thanks in advance. I am an 18 year old guy btw. So maybe that is useful information? Oh and I can do a high head voice which gets higher when I lose my ability to sing low notes. P.S. I wrote this really fast at night so I'm sorry if my English isn't that good at the moment.
  6. Hello I recently discovered a YT-Channel called JT Machinima (now JT Music) and I enjoy a lot of their songs. Their main content are rap videos with some singing passages in them. So naturally I tried to sing/rap along and.... I am really bad at it. Obviously, I am a 16 year old boy who never did sth like this before. Song that I tried: So my question: I am a complete beginner. How can I get started and work my way up to sth like this song? How can I sing/rap without damaging my voice? Because when I tried to sing along my voice just breaks/goes silent because I cant reach that pitch. And even if, then my voice gets hoarse. Ps: Singing lessons are not a viable option right now, because I just want to try it and not start paying money or sth. Maybe later. Furthermore I am also kinda shy/scared when it comes to singing so I don't want to join a choir or sth public. Thank you in advance!
  7. Hi everyone im daniel,l im newbie in this forum, so yeah i started to sing early this year inspired by singers like jonny craig n tyler carter, one thing i noticed about jonny craig is that when he tries to sing high there is a little distortion, this is one of my favorites songs by him, u can hear that grit almost all song, i mean i can sing high but that exactly technique is what is hard for me,im self-taught so i dont have i coach so, i wish u could help me or at least understand it n how to perform it or develop it,
  8. I suck at titles so forgive the above. But in essences yes I have rhinitis & a deviated septum. But I'm not sure if those are the sole reason for my problems singing wise. My main issue is a sore throat when singing in chest voice. I think it's because I do not know how to activate the diaphragm beyond belting. I have many other problems (1. consistency (sometimes I sound good others bad & I'm singing the same song), 2. diaphragm breathing, 3. I hate my tone, 4. nasal drip creates cracked voice, 5. nasally blocked nose sound when singing, 6. squeaky voicing when transitioning to higher notes, 7. weak voice with no resonance) but let's keep it minimal for my first post & stick to getting rid of the sore throat that I get when singing in chest voice. I would like it to no longer be painful & as painless as when I sing in head voice if possible. I don't have soundcloud etc so I hope it's cool that my link is to my tumblr page with the same name (though I change my name a lot) you are free to listen to my other vocal posts & comment on that too. https://singing-with-a-deviated-septum.tumblr.com/post/165584890474 Have a lovely day. PS: And please be as honest as can be, because the sooner I clear my head of delusions the better it is overall.
  9. Hello fellow singers, looking for input how to approach teaching singing. I'm going to be teaching an 11 year old girl who's interested in pop/jazz. I'm fairly proficient at conveying the basics about breath,support, posture, technical stuff mostly. What exercises would you recommend, general tips and what should I focus on in general. Any advice from pro vocal teachers would be mostly appreciated.
  10. Hi all, I'm gauging interest for a platform I'm looking to start. Its purpose is to provide high-quality material to allow you to self-teach a multitude of different skills using efficient learning methods. The methods that will be taught are incredibly powerful, allowing for quick and considerable results if you are willing to put the work in. The site would be a subscription-based service, with some free content, and payment providing access to additional content teaching you what these self-teaching methods are, and then applying them to many different skills. While we wouldn't teach you the skill itself, we're teaching you how to teach yourself how to do it. The whole idea being to learn how to learn effectively, which you can then apply to singing or indeed any other skill that you'd like to learn. I've added a poll to this post, so please put your vote in. I'd also love to hear any additional comments or questions if you have any below. Thanks, John
  11. Hi, so just recorded this clip (No rain)(sorry for the quality, im traveling right now) but I want to know if im using the right technique, and if this is any closer to a good mix voice. Of course, a lot of things to work on regarding the song, but I'd like to know if im on the right track and what should I improve or work on for those high notes. At the end of the clip I also did a small comparison between a very nasal tone and a cleaner tone. Im not sure if this nasal tone is the right way (+ diaphram compression) to get a good distortion for heavier songs? Finally i also attached another clip (Paradise city) which is basically me playing around with this nasal tone quality to see if i get a good result. Thank you very much! cant wait to be singing these songs live:D
  12. Hi guys! I was wondering how this singing technique that is used by Olivia O' Brien in "i hate u i love u" at 0:25 on the word "love" worked. It might be a very small vocal lick or something like that, but I haven't been able to identify the melody used here. The same goes for this "FIRE" cover of Aki Chan at 0:58, on the third "La" she is singing. Thank you very much for your reply in advance
  13. Hi Folks, This video really highlights all of the style and skill inside M.J.'s vocals. I thought it would be enlightening to hear, study and digest. All the little embellishments and techniques he used, some exclusive to only him. It's a great resource if you want to tackle that one and cover it well. Vocals begin around 46 seconds in.
  14. I am a 15 year old and have been trying to learn singing for over six months, but with little to no progress. I can't sing in tune with any song. No one in my family, neither from my mother's nor from my father's side, can sing well. Maybe it's something hereditary that prevents me from singing well. Whatever the reason may be, I have absolutely no talent when it comes to singing. So, I want to return to square one. Please suggest a vocal training routine and share some tips.
  15. Hi all, have not posted here for a while. I'm still studying and practicing and I've improved a lot but there's a big gap between what I can do and where I want to be. I had a few opportunities to sing while playing with people and I still sing out of tune more than I would want to (although I really improved in this sense), moreover, I don't always feel that I exactly understand my capabilities. When I picked up a guitar I've started playing with bands/people after two years of playing (a year and half of lessons and half a year practicing alone). With vocal training it seems like it would take much longer. I did have experience playing the piano before I picked up the guitar - so I already had fundamental for playing an instrument while singing takes some additional techniques that I never used (if that makes sense). Still, I'm writing because I'm somewhat frustrated... For the more experienced guys here: how many years of lessons and practicing did it take for you to be confident enough to actually start singing in a band/seriously recording?
  16. I have been placing my hands on my throat and on top of my diaphragm at the same time and have found out that a lot of tension is gone. No breaking, more resonance, better relaxed richer tone. Everything is good, no problems with that. But when we perform, I am sure that our hands should not hold our throat haha. That would just look weird. What is another thing I can do to trick the brain to not add unnecessary tension to the voice?
  17. I just read this article about Xfactor's vocal coach who also trains Jessie J, Sam Smith and others famous singers. I found it quite interesting towards the last part of the article that he talks about needing raw talent to get the most out of your voice. What do you think? Do you agree? https://medium.com/for-life-journal/the-x-factor-vocal-coach-who-saw-money-in-one-direction-7481d565a24d#.igbgyo7zp
  18. Hii... i'm posting this one link here... its a pretty untidy take at the song I am confused as to whether this hooty sound is head voice or what is supposedly called the 'reinforced falsetto' .. what i know is that its not meaty enough the way true resonant head voice is ... I've nowadays taken to exercising for a fuller head voice..But i wanted to know just what i've done here
  19. Just want to know if I should keep singing or give it up? (Singing) ----> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lsbptdfKSFs
  20. Vocal Aerobics: Essentials for Today's Singers with Julie Lyonn Lieberman Running Time and Format: 60-minute instructional DVD Distributed by: Hal Leonard Corporation (7777 W. Bluemound Rd. Milwaukee, WI 53213, 800-637-2852, http://www.halleonard.com /) to bookstores, music stores and schools through the world) Release Date: September 30, 2008 Description: World-renowned music educator, Julie Lyonn Lieberman, has created an instructional DVD for singers. Her practice system focuses on cognitive illumination and muscular facility. This system can help develop a vibrating palette that communicates spirit, emotion, and viewpoint all riding effortlessly on the breath. It is supported by science yet connected to individuality. By first guiding the exercises in silence, her intent is to prevent the tension and misuse that often occur when the main impetus for the creation of musical sound is fueled by a brew of yearning and fear mixed with a fixation on the end product. Topics covered include: Section I Introduction, Creating a Cathedral, Breath Anatomy Section II Aerobicizing the Tongue, Mobilizing the Lips Section III Balancing the non-dominant side of the mouth, Posture, The Power of Imagery, Warming Up and Warming Down, Vocal Health Ms. Lieberman trusts the innate intelligence of the client by making sure that they understand how and why each region of their vocal anatomy works the way it does. Through extensive experience teaching, she has developed ergonomically based exercises that are fulcrum triggers: they get the job done more efficiently and faster. Lieberman has discovered that when the lights are turned on and the equipment is illuminated, epiphanies abound and can continue to be generated by the singer, long after the teacher leaves the room. In-depth studies while writing her critically acclaimed book. You Are Your Instrument, followed by her three spin-off DVDs (The Vocalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, The Instrumentalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, and The Violin in Motion) place a unique spin on this body of work. Most voice teachers use exercises that are effective in the long run or they would be put out of business, but the older model for mentorship entailed I do and do as I say approach. It was a faith-based relationship; the student was expected to blindly follow the teacher's directions without specifics, context, or adequate rapport with the musculature required to do the job smoothly and consciously. The belief behind that style of work was that if you repeated each exercise enough times (often while inadvertently thinking about something else), that it would help you sing better. This is the long, slow train to success. Julie believes that it's time to replace unconscious repetition with less activity, more awareness, and targeted control. She will help you convert the butcher's knife into a laser beam! To Order: see JulieLyonn.com and click on Vocalist's Corner About the author Julie Lyonn Lieberman (JulieLyonn.com) has specialized in working with creative vocalists in her NYC music studio over the last 3 decades. Her students have included artists such as Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Vanessa Carlton, Grammy-nominated Putnam Murdock, Indie music award winner Kara Suzanne (best new folk-singer/songwriter album of the year), and critically acclaimed lyricist Julie Flanders, to name a few. Ms. Lieberman is an improvising violinist/singer, composer, recording artist, journalist, educator, and the author of nine books and six instructional DVDs. A dynamic, participatory workshop leader, her ability to stimulate participants to think and grow in new ways has earned respect for her work throughout the world. In addition to currently teaching improvisation at Juilliard, she has presented for organizations like Music Educators Association, International Association of Jazz Educators, the Juilliard MAP Program, Carnegie/Weill Hall/Juilliard's The Academy, National Young Audiences, and the Carnegie Hall LinkUp. Lieberman is a J. D'Addario Elite Clinician. Alfred Publishing publishes her scores.
  21. Hello there, so you came here with in mind "No way!" Or maybe because when i drink i think i sound better. Ladies and gents, it gives me confidence. This is what i need to get past, i have recorded myself drinking and that's the only time i sound good. I am a song wrighter, and i play almost every instrument out there. It seems whenever there are people listeining, i forget how too. I cant imagine what i would sound like if i got past this confidence issue i have. I live in an apartment, i cant let loose unless NO ONE is near me, and that is when i am most confident. Ive came here to ask you, have you ever had this simular issue...And how did you get past it... Much Love, Michael.
  22. Hey guys, so in the last few months with the help of our very own sexy Swedish bastard Jens I've made a lot of progress in honing my vocal technique and even more excitedly, my falsetto register! In days before I had completely abandoned the M2 register thinking it was a useless party trick and that if you pulled chest long enough you'd start developing "Real head voice." Obviously, I'm a complete jackass for thinking that but my bro Jens luckily had the knowledge to convince me of the true nature of falsetto and how it was a necessary component to seriously train in balance with the entire voice. So, fast forward to last monday, in the middle of the night I came down with horrible stomach cramps and could not keep any food or liquid down. It turned out my intestines had become partially blocked due to previous complications of a major surgery I had in 2011. So, all of sudden here I am spending an entire night forcing myself to throw up to relieve the built up pressure from the blockage. For somewhere around seven hours I continuously spit my guts up in the most horrible way you could concerning vocal health. This went on for quite some time before I decided to call 911 on myself and get help. Upon entering the hospital with an already completely destroyed voice (Seriously, I had lost my voice more than I ever had before) they decided the best method of treatment would be to put a three inch plastic tube down my nose and into my stomach for a week. Unfortunately, not only was this tube as painful as it sounds but it was also made my throat 100% burning soar and prevented any chance of vocalizing. Now, the tube has just come out which is an AMAZING relief but as I try my first vocalizations since the incident I noticed my falsetto register is COMPLETELY gone. Before I came in, it was soaring, easy, quite pleasant and was just starting to pick up some nice twang potential thanks to Jen's great instruction. Now, my question to the vocal experts, what would be the best method of going about healing this as soon as possible? When it comes back will it be at square one again or will it return to the same strength it was before I had this vocal trauma? Has anyone else abused their voice before to the point where their falsetto register was lost completely? Thank you and god speed!!
  23. Hey folks, I've made a short how-to video that I thought might be useful to you. It came from watching videos of myself performing and wondering how I was managing to move so damn strangely. Fast forward through four years of dancing lessons, and I've tried to distil down the knowledge I've acquired in to a simple default step to help people feel better and keep the audience engaged. I hope it is useful to you all. http://www.thatdancingchap.com/?p=5
  24. If we define belting in the most general terms possible, let's entertain the notion that it's a vocal sound which derives from talking or yelling. Belting is most often linked to musical theater singing but has been used to describe loud singing in commercial styles such as rock and gospel. Following is a brief description of the essentials of the mechanism of belting voice production, particularly as compared to classical singing. Head: aligned with body but with jaw parallel to ground (head tilted down in classical) Jaw: firmer masseter (chewing) muscle which protrudes jaw slightly forward Hyoid bone: pulls forward Thyroid Cartilage: slides forward (tilts down in front for classical) Larynx Height: higher position (approx. 1 1/2 cervical vertebrae higher) Vocal Fold Vibration Pattern: clapping, square-edge, no zippering, particularly at higher volumes VF closure speed, speed quotient: faster VF closure ratio, closed quotient: longer, closed minimum of 50% of time Increased sub-glottal pressure - upper belly must firm OUT, lower belly IN, to correctly pressurize vocal folds T-A muscle (vocalis): more contracted Frequencies: even range of frequencies up to 15k Subjective sensations: extreme breath holding prior and during the singing smack & sticky, the feeling of folds high speed of closure and long closed phase intense support (5 rules: chest stays up, side/back ribs stay out, upper belly magic spot firms out, lower belly gradually goes in, waist goes out) sound shooting through mouth or chin or upper neck or lower neck or nose Modern belting ideas: 1) Timbre (nasal and/or ringy) and volume should be character-based choices 2) Can be loud, medium or soft (rarely), but cannot be breathy 3) Musical Theater belting can be delineated into at least 5 belting sub-styles: Heavy Belt, Nasal Belt, Brassy Belt (nasal/ringy, mostly nasal, i.e. Ethel Merman), Ringy Belt (nasal/ringy, mostly ringy i.e. Kristin Chenoweth), and Speech-Like Belt (broad spectrum of resonance i.e. Idina Menzel) Teaching Approaches: Calls (Come, Daddy!), Nasals (e.g. nyaa), Lean Exercises, Pressure Sounds (bee staccato) c 2008 - Lisa Popeil's Voiceworks® Method - www.popeil.com lisa@popeil.com - 818-906-7229 - Sherman Oaks, CA Don't miss the Total Singer Workshop LA - February 14-16, 2009