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Found 5 results

  1. Something I have been thinking on lately. I really see good basic, supported, open throat singing as the real basis for good rock singing. I see a guy like Paul Rodgers being almost the ideal base model. Learn that base and THEN add on or go into other directions such as Plant/Cornell As far as actual difficulty or skill level of various classic rock/metal singers, I see it sort of as follows starting from "easiest" to hardest: (of course, ALL of these guys are great and all of it is hard to get close to!) Paul Rogers-----> Robert Plant, Chris Cornell, Rob Halford, G
  2. A small vocal tip with huge benefits. My last video was about vowel anchoring and "up and over" to avoid vocal fatigue. This one is about finding "your voice" by choosing where that vowel anchor sits along the soft palate.
  3. I doubt that this has anything to do with training the voice but there is the possibility. I am a small skinny guy 130 pounds tops all my life. I have not been training aggressively but using more support more twang and cord closure. The issue is this, I have noticed that the soft tissue around my neck is swollen, also under my armpits. Normally my armpits are concave and there was a dip between the collar bones and sides of my neck. These areas are now puffy and convex. Earlier in life while working out with shoulder shrugs(holding weights) and other exercises meant to
  4. I was pondering these metaphors and thought I'd see if I could expand it some. Let me know how you see it! Easel is the pedagogy/coach Canvas is the formants Paint is the phonation Colors are the acoustic qualities & vocal modes Brushes are the intrinsic muscular configurations & appoggio Frame is the musical context/setting (band, choir, acapella, singer w/ instrument, musical, etc.) Lyrics are the finished image Lighting (as in a gallery) is amplification & vocal effects
  5. Many teachers will tell you to squeeze your bum cheeks to eliminate strain and to sing higher notes. What do you guys think of this technique, does it work?
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