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  1. Since the introduction of recording, bands and artists have used specific microphones to capture sound from the entire room. Unfortunately, once captured, trying to fix certain sounds or mistakes was next to impossible. This is where Zylia comes in with their ZM-1 Microphone. It makes use of 19 separate condenser microphones that are spread across the spherical body, as well as a single LED ring that runs through the equator of the device to indicate its recording functionality. Essentially, recordists have the ability to capture a 3D, 360-degree sound, as well as traditional stereo. We like to think of it as the virtual reality of the audio world. Let's dive into our Zylia ZM-1 Review to see what this bad boy is all about. Specs 19 Microphone Omnidirectional Digital MEMS Capsules LED Ring Status Recording Indicat0r 48 kHz / 24-bit Recording USB Connectivity 20-20,000 Hz Frequency Range The Review Overall, the ZM-1 is impressive. It is easy to see something like this and think that it might be a gimmick, as there is a hollow character with many of these types of microphones. Luckily, it's just not the case. The Zylia ZM-1 comes with a tabletop stand and a threaded microphone stand, which allows you to place it just about anywhere in the room. It connects to your computer via USB and uses special software to get it going. It is as simple as setting your microphone up in the middle of the room, calibrating it, and recording. The software will even ask you what kind of instruments you are recording before asking you to play an eight-second bit on each of the instruments so that it can find the instruments in the space. Though you might have to move the instruments around in the room a bit to get the mix that you desire, the software gives you the ability to tweak the mix much more than you'd think. Let's say your guitar that was placed in the corner of the room needs to be turned up. You can simply adjust that guitar in correlation with the microphone that was picking it up the most. Essentially, you get a room recording with multi-track session editing capability. The track separation is impeccable. Even the small amounts of bleed can be tweaked using regular DAW software in post. It is great for picking up live performances and crowd responses at the same time, perfect for those who are looking to record a live EP, for example. You can even use it to capture 360-degree audio for YouTube of Facebook, making the creation of enveloping soundscapes a breeze. Pros and Cons Pros Innovative Design Perfect For Live Performances High-Quality Audio Capturing Solid Software Tweak-ability Cons None that that are worthy of mentioning. Not really... Should You Buy It? The Zylia ZM-1 is a well-executed recording device that delivers beautiful room recordings with the ability to edit and re-mix well after the fact. There is nothing currently available that we've found that can do what this thing can do. Yes, it might take a bit to get used to, but once you get it set up, it is the perfect device for on-the-spot recordings in just about any space you can think of. Don’t leave without grabbing The Four Pillars of Singing if you haven’t already and make sure to subscribe to our Facebook group to get all of the vocal information you could possibly need! If you currently use the Zylia ZM-1 let us know what you think in the comments!
  2. Are you in the market for a microphone? Don't say no. If you are a serious vocalist, then you are ALWAYS looking out for the latest and greatest microphones on the market. (And we already know that you're a serious vocalist, because you're here, reading the TVS blog, after all.) Maybe you're already a microphone aficionado, and reading this blog post will be like eating candy for you. Perhaps you aren't yet an expert, and you're wondering which are the best microphones for singers. Whatever brings you here, read on, because this post is for you. If you are a dedicated vocalist studying the TVS method, then you'll definitely want to start training with amplification. That much is a given. So let's discuss some of the different types of microphones out there, talk about a few of Robert Lunte's go-to recommendations, and then check out some of the newest, coolest mics from the recent 2018 NAMM show. First off, basics. Feel free to skip this first section if you're already a complete authority on microphones. For the relative newbies to the world of vocal amplification, there are TONS of different mics on the market, but we're going to briefly discuss a few major classifications today: Dynamic Microphones Condenser Microphones Ribbon Microphones Modeling Microphones Wireless Microphones Read on to find out the some of the main differences between these types of tech. [caption id="attachment_155243" align="alignright" width="238"] The JZ HH1 - A Great Handheld Microphone from Latvia. Dynamic Microphones Dynamic microphones are more commonly used in live settings, on stage. They are generally the most sturdy microphones out there and are usually on the less expensive side. If you have never before purchased a microphone, a decent dynamic mic is an excellent place to start, as they are the top recommended microphones for beginners. Click HERE and use the code: VOCALISTSTUDIO to get a special TVS deal on the JZ HH1. Condenser Microphones The Audio Technica AT5047 Cardioid Condenser Microphone commonly used in studio settings. Typically a bit more delicate than dynamic microphones, condenser mics are more sensitive and responsive, and they offer a more true-to-life sound than dynamics. They can pick up on finer nuances in sound. If you are looking for a microphone to use in a home studio that has some degree of soundproofing, you might want to look into condenser microphones. Ribbon Microphones The AEA KU4 Unidirectional Ribbon Mic Ribbon microphones are a unique style of mic, built around a thin piece of metal -- the “ribbon.” They have a rich natural sound and can capture the glorious tone from old recordings made in the 40s. However, they are often very delicate and fragile and they can be quite expensive. There are ribbon mics out there designed for live use, but they can still be a little more easily damaged than your go-to dynamic mic... so be very careful if using a ribbon mic on your next rock gig, and maybe consider saving the ribbon for studio use only! The Antelope Audio Edge Modeling Microphone Modeling Microphones Modeling microphones are more of a specialty item right now, but they are promising technology, poised to change the way we record vocalists and change the way we even think about mics. These are microphones that are designed to “model” other microphones. Picture a microphone that can recreate either the same iconic sound from the mic the Frank Sinatra used… OR the same sound from the mic that your favorite radio host uses today. These microphones are incredibly versatile. They pair with advanced modeling engines to create killer recordings, and are amazing. The Rode RODELink Performer Kit Digital Wireless Wireless Microphones Wireless microphones are used in any setting where the vocalist needs to be moving around a great deal. Training with a wireless microphone can be incredibly useful for vocalists who need to prepare for work in musical theatre or in any active performance setting. (Think of Beyoncé. Does she just stand and sing in front of a stationary mic at every show? Absolutely not.) Vocalists need to be able to perform in various different settings, with various different microphones, so training on a wireless system can be extremely beneficial, even for a beginning vocalist. Click HERE For Recommended Microphones & Home Recording Gear! Top Recommended Microphones To access the full list of mics that Robert recommends that vocalists use, in order to train with amplification, then you’ll need to pick up your copy of The Four Pillars of Singing. However, we can tell you two hand-picked mics from Robert Lunte’s list: 1) The JZ HH1 & The Sennheiser e935 Dynamic Microphone These are robust, reliable handheld microphones that are reliable and sound great. The e935 has a fantastically balanced EQ, both low and high end. It is also super durable. Definitely should be one of your frontline microphones. The JZ HH1 is unique because it has a great balance of low and high end, but unlike other handhelds, it has an "airyness" or "windyness" to the coloration which I actually really like! This unique element to the microphones coloration gives the mic a hair of white noise. I think this mic is very well suited for rock and metal for this reason. 2) The Antelope Audio Edge Duo & Edge Solo The Antelope Audio emulation microphones are really cutting-edge. Emulation technology allows singers to use plug-ins to capture the unique sound coloration characteristics of 18 of the world's most legendary, classic recording microphones. In other words, you can purchase one microphone system, and get the sound color and characteristics of 18 microphones but just dropping and menu and selecting the emulation you want. VIEW THE VIDEOS BELOW. Make sure to check out the Antelope Audio emulation microphones at The Vocalist Studio Vocal Gear Store! You can also purchase directly from Antelope Audio HERE and use this code to save $50: thevocaliststudio% 3) The Rode RODELink Performer Kit Digital Wireless Audio System The Rode RODELink Performer Kit is a fabulous solution for the vocalist on the lookout for a wireless microphone that is inexpensive. Easy to set up, with a good sound, this system is something to consider if you’ve ever wanted to train and perform with a wireless microphone. 4) Vintage Microphones from the 60s, 70s & 80s Two vintage microphones from Robert Lunte's collection. The Electro-Voice SRO-627B and the Italian RCF MD 2702[/caption] One of the most interesting and fun ways to purchase a microphone is to shop for refurbished microphones from previous eras. Many of these microphones sound great, just as good, or almost as good as contemporary microphones. They are all very rare. Great for microphone geeks and collectors. The industrial design and novelty of vintage handheld microphones is a big reason why these microphones are sought after. Here is a site where Robert Lunte shops for vintage microphones. Reverb. Click HERE For Recommended Microphones & Home Recording Gear!
  3. The Mojave Audio MA-1000 Click Here to Purchase
  4. Putting The TC Helicon VoiceTone T1 To The Test If you were following The Modern Vocalist Journal earlier this year with the debut TMVJ Product Reviews, some of you may recall the review of the TC Helicon D1 VoiceTone pedal. The VoiceTone Singles series feature 7 new single function pedals designed to add professional vocal results and offer maximum flexibility and portability. The are all stoutly built 'stomp boxes' for vocalists that can be linked together in the signal chain with the ability to be controlled via the newly released TC Helicon MP-75 microphone - one I might add TMVJ is slated to review later this fall. More to come. Back to the subject at hand: The TC Helicon VoiceTone T1. TC Helicon VoiceTone T1: FEATURES OVERVIEW Like its singles pedal brethren the VoiceTone T1 utilizes the same durable alloy stomp box form factor. The purpose of the T1 according to TC is to "adapt studio-quality compression, de-ess and EQ to your [sic ] voice". Sounds interesting considering the T1 features a total of 3 adjustment controls. Those consist of rotary "Shape" and "Comp/De-ess" knobs and a "Warmth" in/out switch. Other controls are a main effect stomp switch with on/off led indicator, mic gain control with signal/clip light and Mic-Control off/on switch for MP-75 control. Labeling and layout is up to typical high TCH standards as is the quality of the controls. Each singles pedal features different colored accents to differentiate them. In this case the T1 sports bright yellow accents on black with a grippy matching rubber anti-skid mat. As of this writing the T1 was retailing on GuitarCenter.com for $129.00. Standard XLR in/out are provided along with fairly typical wall-wart power jack. One thing to note is the lack of a phantom power switch. The VoiceTone pedals do in fact have phantom power that is always on. It's an interesting design decision but ultimately I would prefer a micro-switch to disable it. A USB port for setting tweaks and upgrades using the downloadable TC-Helicon VoiceSupport application available on both Win and Mac platforms. TC Helicon VoiceTone T1: IN PRACTICE While I never believe in writing a review before I live with a piece of gear for a while the VoiceTone T1 is on the high side of long term as I have spent nearly 4 months dealing with it on a regular basis. While mic's were swapped, effects switched in and out the T1 stayed plugged into live signal chain for the better part of that. In fact at times I almost would forget I had it plugged in at all - but not because it doesn't do anything. In a word the T1 is ultimately transparent operating unobtrusively in the signal chain. Right out of the box I left the T1's Shape and Comp/De-ess knobs centered out, Warmth switch in the off setting and plugged it into last link in my signal chain prior to the board using my trusty warm yet slightly boomy EV N/D767A. After performing some test A/B vocal passes using some of my vocal warm up material, I began to get a feel for the T1's sound. While generally speaking I'm not a huge advocate of adding compression and ultimately removing too much of the dynamics in live vocals due to how it can effect how the vocalist sings my ears tell me the average compression ratio of the T1 to be relatively low. With only two knobs, I can only speculate what's actually happening behind the scenes but I found it to actually leave the bulk of the vocals alone while adding a little bit of beef to the low end and providing just a touch of attenuation on some of my higher belts ultimately providing a slightly smoother vocal. After dialing in my sound a bit more I finally settled on the Shape knob around 8 o'clock and Comp/De-ess around 9 with Warmth still in the off position. Generally speaking I did not find the Warmth setting to be entirely necessary in my application as I found it to add in a bit too much muddiness into the vocals however I could see this being useful given a thinner sounding microphone or singer. My vocals also benefited when using the T1 with the full band. The additi onal clarity provided gave a nice bump of extra vocal cut with a bit more sparkle on the top. With the T1 doing the work of adding a bit of compression and EQ I was safely able to bring up the overall levels a few db's giving me a bit more girth on my lower less-powerful register without fear of feedback. While I understand the point of a minimal amount of available controls with which to tweak the sound I found myself at times yearning for a little bit more in the way of tweak-ability. It might be nice to change the compression ratio or enable/disable de-ess for example. TC Helicon VoiceTone T1: WRAP-UP At the end of the day the TC-Helicon VoiceTone T1 represents yet another solid offering from the company which has brought us the likes of the VoiceLive and VoiceWorks products. This would be a great addition for those of us looking to add icing to the cake on our already good live vocals. Is it absolutely necessary? No. If you're torn between upgrading to the T1 or upgrading your mic start with improving your primary signal chain first. Once you've got your other bases covered then it comes time to add in the VoiceTone. Given TCH's class-leading reputation for build quality and from my experience so far the VoiceTone T1 is worth checking out for those of you looking for a little something extra. Order TC-Helicon T1 Vocal Tone and Dynamics Ef fect Pedal from The Vocal Gear Store NOW! Getting In Touch With TC-Helicon www.tc-helicon.com TC-Helicon Vocal Technologies 1075 Pendergast Street, Suite 204 Victoria BC V8V 0A1 Canada (800) 565-2523 Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  5. In a world full of manufacturers who offer various dynamic microphone models, a handful of proven classics rule the market. Many will agree that the design of this type of instrument has been pretty much perfected and completed over the years, so is it worth paying attention to similar products that still pop up from time to time? We chose one recent entry that has made quite a big name for itself, the JZ Microphones’ HH1, and tested it to see whether it really is an improvement of age-old microphone technology. The HH1 is a handheld dynamic microphone made by a European company called JZ Microphones. It’s their first product to feature a dynamic capsule. They claim it is “developed in best traditions of JZ Microphones” and provides users with “extended frequency range to suit most vocal and instrumental needs.” Neodymium magnet equipped cardioid capsule is housed in a handcrafted metal body with a special shock-mounting technology. It comes with a rather elegant pouch and a microphone clamp. Lighter and brighter That’s the thing with JZ Microphones: it seems that everything they make has some unique visual twist. As you can see, the same goes for the HH1. One has to admit that the microphone looks awesome: matte black coloring, a fancy logo, and diamond-shaped flat-fronted grille. It is the size of a typical dynamic (58 x 172 mm), has an XLR-3 connector, and an extended frequency response (50 Hz – 18 kHz). Weighing 280 grams (9.8oz), it is a bit lighter than the SM58. The frequency graph that comes along with the microphone shows a noticeable peak at 5 kHz and shelving-down right before 200Hz, meaning that it’s lighter and brighter than most standard dynamics. The simple geniality of a flat grille JZ Microphones says that the HH1 is a perfect fit for vocals, drums, and guitar amps. We tested it in various scenarios for all three applications. We started by trying it on both male and female vocals, and were impressed instantly. It turns out this mic needs little to no EQ. Gone were our fears that the HH1 would have a cheap brightness you get from low-quality mics. Instead, it had great clarity on male as well as female vocals. The HH1’s flat grille has to be mentioned here as well. It keeps the sound source on-axis while avoiding tone and level variations. It was the same story when it came to the acoustic guitar, which produced just the right amount of brightness even at close distances. The flat grille also made for easy, spot-on guitar amp miking (obviously). It was a good fit for a snare drum as well, providing much-needed definition. Among all the pros, the only con I could think of would be a mild self-noise (the HH1 has a pretty strong output). To be frank, it is not even close to being a real problem (at least for us, in our setting it wasn’t) but it is a bit more noticeable than that of other classics. HH1 – a dynamic with distinct studio mic pedigree In conclusion, the HH1 easily fits among the best sounding industry standard dynamic mics. It has its own sound but isn’t a black sheep or avant-garde in any way, and if the market for dynamic microphones wasn’t so oversaturated, this little piece of technology would make the competition worried. It is hard to be completely blown away by yet another dynamic because there are so many to choose from. However, there’s no denying that with the HH1, JZ Microphones has managed to raise the bar for sound and design. It is very apparent that this dynamic mic was made by people who mainly specialize in high-quality studio microphones. It is elegant yet very well built and should withstand the punishment of live performances. If you’re ready to try something new, don’t hesitate and get one of these. This can be an excellent choice for rehearsal studios, live performances, demo making, and bedroom studio projects. Find out more about JZ Microphones products.
  6. Hello Fellow TMVW members! Humbling though it may be, I thought I would share a track I'm working on, (Beatles - In My Life) and the vocal "sculpting" process I go through in an effort to record my best performance. (I'd never share unfinished tracks except to friends and in this forum . . . plain vanity) I've had a lot of experience analyzing my vocals for recordings, I never quite knew how to articulate the process I was engaging in nearly as well as after having gone through The Four Pillars of Singing, learning the "talk track" I've heard Robert Lunte utilize across many hours of lecture videos! Once one is familiar enough with these "mechanisms" for mending, strengthening, or otherwise fine tuning a vocal line, the mystery about what to do goes away! Rob's techniques are structured in a simple, yet meticulous sequence that really does create the feeling of having a vocal sculpting tool box! I'm posting this both as a subject of interest to others who may be starting out with this type of challenge, and as a means of accountability for me to complete the process, which has been brutal for me due to inexperience with the recording software. It's good for me though, as I intend to record several old hit favorite song interpretations in the coming months. I'll post my final "sculpture" here for this track when I finally complete it. "Work to be done" on this vocal performance is: Pitchy lyrics / appaggio drop out, vowel mods for best resonance, better phrasing, embouchure brightening, slight lightening of mass throughout, . . . . I'm sure there's more, also, rhythm guitar mistakes, and guitar solo is not quite tight yet, not happy with the effects on my voice yet either. I'm contemplating leaving the last "in my life" line unresolved like it is now. I was trying to sing that last half of the last line and had to quit recording due to a leaf blower. I think i'll like it that way, maybe with a high harmony over the top. Lastly, I may end up using a different mic than I did for this take. One thing that clearly gets hammered home in this process is that performing live is a far more forgiving environment than being under the microscope of a recording. Peace, k
  7. Hi there, Why does this spectrogram of me singing a scale show more than one frequency at the same time?
  8. Please go and visited my channel and view some videos www.paytonsellsmusic.com
  9. European company JZ Microphones is amongst many manufacturers that offer a modern take on vintage sound. Their Vintage 11 (V11) is said to produce very smooth sounding top end, and in theory, should be very good for voice-over work. But the concept of “modern vintage” still sounds a bit vague and lacking explanation to some. Needless to say, we got our hands on one of these mics to see what it does. When it comes to striking visual design characteristic of JZ Microphones, the V11 is no exception. This thing looks like it belongs in the interior of an expensive luxury car, perhaps as an ashtray or a compartment for your diamond encrusted smartphone. A modern take on a vintage sound The V11 is a high-performance cardioid condenser microphone with a one-inch gold sputtered capsule (JZ Microphones patented GDC capsule making technology). JZ Microphones claims that while the microphone is quite versatile it works best on acoustic guitar, vocals, and wind instruments. The frequency graph of V11 shows a noticeable bump in the lower end and suggests it is designed to deliver smooth, rich, and warm sounds. The V11 has a large diaphragm 27 mm (1,06") capsule, extra low self-noise level (6,5 dB (A)) maximum sound pressure level (SPL) of 134,5 dB, class-A discrete electronics, and gold-plated output contacts. It comes with an external specially designed shock-mount and, just like all other mics that JZ Microphones produces, is handcrafted. Noticeably above the similarly priced competition Opinions about microphones are subjective, but it has to be mentioned that V11 has caught the attention of award-winning producer Rafa Sardina (Lady Gaga, Beyoncé, Stevie Wonder). Sardina has repeatedly stated that he loves many JZ Microphones products and judging from the interviews, the V11 is one of his favorites. We tested it on both male and female singers, trying out a number of singing styles and settings.6 Other “Vintage” series mics (V47, V67) are supposedly made to bring back the sound of all time classics but with the V11 (11 stands for 2011 – the year in which the mic was launched) the company’s founder and designer Juris Zarins hoped to create a microphone that would give you a vintage vibe, but with quite a bit of modern mic-making tradition present in design and during production. The sound, however, shows why JZ Microphones is confident enough to call it the “next classic” on more than one occasion. It proved to be a true gem when it came to spoken word performances. This microphone doesn’t look the part, but it is indeed an excellent tool for radio and performs exceptionally well as a voiceover microphone. Minimal to no EQ intervention is needed, in my opinion. When it comes to singing, it is quite warm yet does not lose clarity. Also, if the bass lift is not welcome at all, you can deal with it easily. The built-in shock-mount is very simple, easy to use, and actually works. The V11’s price tag makes it fair to compare it to all other work-horses that are used for spoken word and broadcasting, and the V11 stands out with a more refined, classy sound. You can just feel that it wasn’t designed as a budget microphone meant to overwhelm the market. They’ve obviously put serious thought into it. I can’t find any problems with construction or sound. I’m going to guess that the reason for this is that the company mainly produces expensive “premium” class microphones and hasn’t really optimized the V11’s production to fit the mid-range price tag. I am pretty sure that most if not all of the high-grade components they use for their most expensive mics are in the V11 as well. After all, are there many other mid-priced microphones that have impressed the likes of Rafa Sardina? In conclusion All in all, what strikes me is the big picture. From what’s written in brochures, the big claims and peculiar marketing strategy might make some buyers confused. I’m still not sure why the whole “modern yet vintage” concept was chosen. In reality, it is simply a very good, very well built, warm-sounding studio microphone with an attractive price tag (and from what I can see, they have generous discounts very often). Someone who is operating on a budget looking for that hi-end studio sound should consider the V11. Accomplished pros have no reason to shy away from it, too. Granted, it is not made to compete with and function like more expensive studio classics, but it is so much more (I can’t stress this enough) than the price tag suggests. Find out more about JZ Microphones products.
  10. For about ten years, a European company called JZ Microphones has made its flagship Black Hole 2 (BH2) studio microphone, supposedly a versatile, visually stunning, and beautifully sounding mic that “easily finds its place among celebrated all-time classics”. It seems that up until now critics have showered this piece of technology with one favorable review after another (to the point where it almost gets a bit ridiculous), so we thought we’d give it a try and see if it really deserves such generosity. The looks JZ Microphones present their BH2 as a “premium”, “high-end” studio microphone, but I’m sure most of you will agree that it does not really look the part. First of all, there’s a hole in the middle. The microphone seems to be rather small and thin, and it doesn’t look like it will fit in a standard spider shock-mount. It leaves you with quite a few questions when you unpack it for the first time, but let’s take a look at some important facts in the brochure. The tech BH2 is a fixed cardioid, large diaphragm 1,06" (27mm) condenser microphone with one large, true electrostatic capsule inside the compact head. Qualities that make it stand out amongst the rest of the herd are JZ Microphones’ patented capsule making technology, Golden Drop Capsule (GDC). Once this technology is implemented, it gives the microphone extra low self-noise level of 7,5 dB (A), discrete class-A electronics, maximum Sound Pressure Level (SPL) of 134,5 dB, and a unique reverberation-canceling shape. It also comes with a specially designed shock-mount and is made by hand. The sound When we decided to test the BH2 we came up with quite an obstacle course: we would use it in all sorts of vocal applications with numerous singers and different types of voices. Upon playing back the very first takes, it became clear how unfair it was to judge this microphone by its looks. The recorded voice sang to us with almost no coloration yet the sound was very flattering (especially for male vocals, as it later became clear) and seemed polished. BH2 presented itself to us in a very primal way. It was like being approached by a large wild animal: you feel its presence instantly. There was no need to analyze the sound or compare it to something else. It was clear right then and there that this mic should not be disregarded. It produces very crisp, detailed voice recordings and would probably do an amazing job with rap vocals. It performs very well both close up and from a considerable distance and captures clear recordings of multiple singers at once. Sure, it gave off U87 and C414 vibes (as often mentioned in reviews), but the amazing part that there’s a very large, dominating chunk of its own personality in there. It delivers the actual sound of whatever it is you’re recording with no apparent noise and features ridiculously low, yet beautiful coloration. This microphone is made for professionals and should be used in high-class studios. To a seasoned recording engineer, it will deliver the pristine sound that is expected of such a specialist. To a singer, it will bring out the very best characteristics of your voice. To someone who is not yet ready, it will tell it to you straight and emphasize your shortcomings. There is no disputing that putting “premium”, “high-end” (or any other fancy English words that the BH2’s European engineers can think of) on to the box of this microphone is completely justified. Although the unusual shape and origins of this microphone can leave you perplexed at first, it soon becomes clear that back in 2007 when JZ Microphones created the BH2, they came up with a whole new design for technology that recently celebrated its 100th birthday. Find out more about JZ Microphones products.
  11. Hello all, I used to use a crappy USB Art M-one condenser mic but after doing much research have upgraded to a Scarlett 2i2 combined with an MXL V67G. Problem I recorded myself and to be honest, while the recording is clean and clear (at least compared to my crappy USB condenser mic), it sounds so different from when I sing in person. This recording lacks power, and it just has this really dampened feeling, and sounds so boring compared to myself singing in person (friends who I show this to agree also). I'm wondering if this can be fixed just through software like EQ-ing and compressing, reverb etc, or do I need a better mic? If I do, I would preferably like to spend below $100. Recording Info The recording I have below is just noise reduction and normalize, no compression, reverb, equalizer nothing. I have tried some basic compression & reverb on another recording and while it improves the output (have not uploaded this MP3 yet), still doesn't sound the same as in person. Am I just a newb at EQ-ing? Or is this a microphone limitation? Recording below EDIT: If this is the wrong forum, mods please move to correct one
  12. Robert Lunte & RØDE Microphones present four weeks of vocal training in Germany, Italy and France. April, 2018. For information click the links below or reach out to the people tagged in this post. See you in April! TVS Events Page http://bit.ly/TVSEvents Download The Tour Poster HERE: http://bit.ly/TVSMCTourSpring2018 14-15 APR Ansbach, Germany http://bit.ly/TVSMCAnsbachGermany 21-22 APR Pescara, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCPescaraItaly 28-29 APR Cagliari, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCCagliariItaly 1-2 MAY Nimes, France http://bit.ly/TVSMCNimesFrance If you have any questions about the event or private lessons, contact me on my personal email or here at TMV World. I look forward to helping you with your singing. You will get results, guaranteed.
  13. Robert Lunte & RØDE Microphones present four weeks of vocal training in Germany, Italy and France. April, 2018. For information click the links below or reach out to the people tagged in this post. See you in April! TVS Events Page http://bit.ly/TVSEvents Download The Tour Poster HERE: http://bit.ly/TVSMCTourSpring2018 14-15 APR Ansbach, Germany http://bit.ly/TVSMCAnsbachGermany 21-22 APR Pescara, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCPescaraItaly 28-29 APR Cagliari, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCCagliariItaly 1-2 MAY Nimes, France http://bit.ly/TVSMCNimesFrance If you have any questions about the event or private lessons, contact me on my personal email or here at TMV World. I look forward to helping you with your singing. You will get results, guaranteed.
  14. Microphones from NAMM 2018! Click "22 New Photos" Below
  15. The Carbonphone by Placid Audio is a very unique microphone for anyone who is interested in experimenting with sound. Its military grade carbon granule element captures sound and creates a "lofi" sound that is naturally distorted. Creating sounds similar to scratchy vinyl or an old military radio, this microphone is perfect for anyone looking to recreate a more vintage tone or anyone looking to create something new altogether. Included with the microphone is the Tone Box which provides the current which is needed to power the microphone. While the microphone can be powered by any standard 9 volt power supply, the Tone Box can also shape the sound through a variable five position filter circuit. Each selection on the control knob offers a different frequency response, allowing the Carbonphone to be used on a broad range instruments and for various applications. Because the sound of Carbonphone has a character unlike many other traditional mics, it makes a great addition to any recording enthusiast’s arsenal of microphones. It can be used as an all out obvious ‘effect’ on it’s own or it can be paired with other traditional microphones for infinite blending possibilities. The Carbonphone is a perfect microphone for any person looking to update their studio with new sounds but it is also usable for live performances and with its high durability and great resistance to high pressure sound levels. FEATURES Military grade carbon granule capsule Fully balanced output Quality Hammond output transformer Rugged copper housing and components Powered 5 position variable filter Tone Box Tone Box doubles as a phantom power source Tone Box can be used with other microphones 9 volt power supply for Tone Box High quality Nuetrik 3 pin XLR connectors Handcrafted in the U.S.A Lifetime operational warranty Adjustable aircraft aluminum mounting bracket to fit North American style stands (will fit European style stands with common threaded adapter) SPECS Type: Carbon Polar Pattern: Cardioid Frequency Response: 100Hz ­- 10kHz Impedance: 600 ohms Output: 120 +/­ 2dB SPL @ 1 kHz Mic Dimensions: 1.75 x 5.5 inches Tone Box Dimensions: 5.25 x 4.25 x 2.25 inches Mic Weight: 1 lbs. Tone Box Weight 0.70 lbs. *The Modern Vocalist World is brought to you by The Vocalist Studio, course and training for singers.
  16. The Chantelle Microphone by Ear Trumpet Labs is created to be the best live vocal microphone, bringing the clarity and warmth of a large diaphragm capsule to a low-profile body. In addition to a smooth high end with no harsh tones and an upper-midrange emphasis, included is also a full foam pop filter for even greater sound control.With exceptional feedback rejection, the can be used on even the loudest of stages.The microphone comes specifically tuned to handle any stage and still provide excellent feedback rejection. Chosen by performers in diverse genres, from R&B (Andra Day) to indie folk (Rachel Sermanni) to roots (Dustbowl Revival), Chantelle has a beautiful copper body and distinctive aesthetic that will inspire singers to give their best performance. Chantelle is an end-address large-diaphragm condenser with a flexible pivoting body, excellent for vocals live, in studio, and in videos. This microphone is perfect for any vocalist wanting a diverse sound with a great amount of control over feedback and tone. With a great design and a very slick aesthetic, this microphone is sure to be a great addition for any singer's arsenal. FEATURES Hand-made microphone with unique appearance Side or end address, using pivoting bracket Capsule and electronics tuned for close vocal use on the loudest of stages with excellent feedback rejection Internal shock dampers for minimal handling noise Integral silk and mesh pop filter, for effective control of plosives without loss of clarity Transformerless FET fully balanced electronics Highest quality hand-wired electronic components - film caps, precision resistors, hand tested and matched transistors, with component values tuned for the individual circuit. TECHNICAL SPECS: Transducer Type: Condenser, large (26 mm) diaphragm Polar Pattern: Cardioid Frequency Response: 20 - 15K hz (-3dB) Sensitivity: -49dB (4 mV/Pa) Output Impedance: <50 Ohm Noise Level(A-weighted): <17 dBA Power Requirement: +48V phantom power Weight: 1 lb (4 lbs cased) Dimensions: 8” x 2” x 2”; head is 2” in diameter Sku: ETL-CHANTELLE Hear The Chantelle *The Modern Vocalist World is brought to you by The Vocalist Studio, course and training for singers.
  17. The Copperphone by Placid Audio is a vintage character effect microphone. Unlike full range high fidelity microphones, it operates within a limited bandwidth of frequencies which imparts a compelling nostalgic quality on the signal. Some might compare the sound to an AM radio or an old telephone... The sound is achieved through a combination of the microphone’s element and a mechanical filtering device. The element is rear ported into a hollow resonant chamber and as sound passes through the diaphragm into the chamber, upper midrange frequencies are accentuated while low and high frequencies are reduced. The Copperphone can be used as a stand-alone mic on vocals or any other instrument to create an all-out, attention-grabbing sonic effect. Or it can be used in conjunction with a more traditional mic and the resulting signals can be blended together for subtle character and midrange enhancement. Sound samples of the Copperphone on vocals and various instruments can be heard here: https://www.placidaudio.com/products/copperphone/ The critically acclaimed Copperphone is the worlds most popular vintage effect microphone and used by hundreds of professionals and vocalists around the world. Here are just a few notable users: Norah Jones (Norah Jones) Sam Smith (Sam Smith, 2014 Grammy Winner) Annie Clark (St. Vincent, 2015 Grammy Winner) Sean Lennon (Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger, Cibo Matto) Beck (Beck) Jack White (Raconteurs, The White Stripes) Dan Auerbach (The Black Keys) Tom Petty (Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers) Geddy Lee (Rush)
  18. There is something that dose not seam quite right about there tracks. they just don't sound like the originals and the quality is not the same what do you think?
  19. Robert Lunte, of The Vocalist Studio and The Four Pillars of Singing shares some details about the Audio VX5, condenser microphone. Purchase the Audix VX5 here: http://www.TheVocalGearStore.com. Description The VX5 is a multi purpose, professional vocal condenser microphone designed for live, studio and broadcast applications. With an ability to duplicate studio quality sound on stage, the VX5 has a smooth and accurate frequency response, resistance to feedback and handles very high SPLs without distortion. Designed with a tight and uniformly controlled supercardioid polar pattern, the VX5 helps isolate vocals from the rest of the stage. Other features are a 14 mm gold vapor diaphragm, an acoustically ported steel mesh grill with a multi-stage pop filter, and a -10 dB pad and bass roll-off filter. The VX5 will handle SPLs in excess of 140 dB (with pad and roll-off engaged) and will provide over 20 dB of ambient noise rejection on live stages. In addition to vocal applications, the VX5 is designed to capture instruments such as guitars, woodwinds, brasses, percussion toys, drum overheads, hi-hats and pianos. The VX5 requires 18 - 52 V phantom power. Applications - Live and studio vocals, lead and backing - Speech - Acoustic instruments Please see the spec sheet under the specifications tab for more information about this product.
  20. So somewhere I have been told we should all record our sing and play it back to our selfs to see where we need improvement. The quality of my recorder on my phone is poor; I know this as when I record the online piano onto it you can not hear the notes properly. This is the same with the inbuilt recorder in my laptop but not the same with my external mike; that records the piano notes OK I suppose and that is what I have been using to record myself via Reaper and uploaded previously in the review my singing section of this forum. But Using reper is not just a case of press record then stop then play then rewind then rerecord and so on I want something ever so simple that I can use while driving and with a decent enough recorder and at minimal cost Any ideas please
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    Gary Osborne is the founder and inventor of Lampifier Microphones. Lampifier Microphones feature a unique, build in compression solution that uses light as its medium. Lampifier microphones are great microphones and offer an interesting and unique solution to compression for singers. Gary Osborne www.Lampifier.com

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