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Found 45 results

  1. Hey guys. So I've been singing for some years now. I'm classicaly trained, theoretically a tenor, but I could never manage to understand and make the adjustments to go higher than F4 without breaking into M2 or straining a lot. Last year I started reading a lot about voice physiology and learning contemporary singing technique. Now I can go sometimes even up to G5 (not a pretty singable tone yet, but it's there). From Bb4 up I can somehow manage a lighter sound that doesn't sound like M2, but between E4 and A4 I can only do full-on belting or something lighter but with a lot of constriction (arytenoids I guess). I'm trying to achieve a lighter and freer M1 (mixed?) sound in that range, and so I've been reading and watching many YouTube videos on that, but I'm very confused with the way scientists and vocal coaches differently name the registers and stuff, so it's being hard to clearly understand what they mean and choose a way to approach the matter. I have to say that I personally think the names Chest, Head and Mixed Voice are terrible and extremely misleading, and they did nothing but prevent me from moving forward. Understanding the vibratory mechanisms and the filter/resonance adjustments is what really is helping me evolve. And although I understand a lot of people don't benefit from scientific explanations, it's really works for me. From what I understand, SCIENTIFICALLY mixed voice can be either: 1. M1 with less vocalis contraction and more nasal airflow/rhinopharyngeal resonance, as used by man and women in contemporary music and by men in high notes in classical. 2. M2 with more rhinopharyngeal resonance and twang in the higher range in contemporary singing. 3. M2 with more rhinopharyngeal resonance in the female first passaggio in classical. And head voice can refer to: 1. any sound in M2 2. only M2 with cartilaginous adduction Now I'm really confused with how vocal coaches use the terms. For me, the sound of what many demonstrate as Head voice - specially those who don't count falsetto as Head voice - is not M2 at all, but rather my first description of Mixed voice (less compressed M1 with rhinopharyngeal resonance). Which makes me think, when they say head voice they are referring mainly to head resonance (rhinopharynx) and not to the vibratory mechanism M2. So although many exercises for bridging/mixing/blending DO go from M1 to M2, and this is of course also used in actual singing, the "bridging" that happens most of the time in the mid-high range is simply the adjustments to go from M1 with oral resonance to M1 with nasal resonance, to allow the laryngeal tilt, less compression and lower subglottal pressure without breaking into M2. I'm still beginning in the science stuff, does anyone with more knowledge in that area agrees, disagrees or have any other thoughts on the subject and on how I could approach a softer sound between E4 and A4?
  2. Hello I am having real trouble finding my falsetto, I can't make that effortless sound, it is always strained. I was always able to make a voice that I thought was falsetto, but I got to the conclusion that is flageolet instead. I got really used to it and it is relaxed, and really sounds like falsetto, but I think it isn't falsetto mainly because: - It isn't connected to chest voice. I know sometimes it's difficult to connect head and chest voice, but this is extremely disconnected, it is a different world. - I am able to transition smoothly from whistle to this flageolet. Not trying hard at all, just lowering the pitch from whistle, I end up in this voice. Demo: https://instaud.io/3rzk So, an example of this strained 'falsetto', in a moment with the voice quite tired (so that the strain is noticeable): https://instaud.io/3rzm Same song, in flageolet (I know it sounds a lot like a falsetto):https://instaud.io/3rzd An example of a song, in falsetto, that sounded better, in a moment my voice wasn't that tired: https://instaud.io/3rzf (Yes, I like Ed Sheeran XD). This is as close to a relaxed falsetto that I can get. So, any advice on how to find that relaxed falsetto? Maybe I am still unable to do it because I have those muscles untrained? I've tried yawning, making the sound of an owl, or Mickey Mouse's voice... Everything is strained. Any advice, or exercise? Thank you in advance Whistle to flageolet.mp3 Strained falsetto.mp3 Flageolet.mp3
  3. I have recently begun teaching vocal lessons to a college student whose main instrument is not her voice. Her air support is strong in both her chest voice and head voice, but she is struggling to transition between the two. The transition is extremely abrupt and causes her to lose confidence in herself. What vocal workouts and exercises may be helpful when working on her mixed voice and transitions?
  4. Hi there folks! I just joined today, my name is Liza Jean (stage name, granted), and I sing for a KC-based rock band. I'm an alto/mezzo and my chest range is roughly F3 to D5, and my head voice is about Eb5 to G5. That being said, I can belt an Eb5 in chest, but it comes and goes, as that area is where my vocal break sits. So I guess I'm here with a few questions! I take singing lessons currently, but I'm pretty certain my teacher doesn't have formal training in the sense of knowing the pieces of the vocal chords. She has her own solo project and usually teaches children, and while we've made some great progress with where my voice was last year, I'm still hitting some roadblocks that I'm not sure how to explain, and that neither of us are sure how to overcome. So I thought I would turn to y'all! So without further ado, I'll try to word these in a way that makes sense: 1. When I initially started working on strengthening my head voice, I did by using a lot of nasal-y 'nya' vocalizing. However, I've found fairly recently that this seems to create a lot of tension in the back of my mouth/back of my tongue. When I sing in head voice, it's hard to not fall into it, and if you put your thumbs under your jaw and right at the back where it curves up, that soft space always feels 'weird' when I sing head voice. The best way I can describe it is like someone's stuffed cotton into the space or similar. I'm pretty sure it's tongue tension but I'm not positive. Thoughts? 2. My chest voice is very deep-sounding in tambre, and pretty warm. Even when I belt, there's still a decent richness to the tone, but once I get into head voice, I lose it. My upper register sounds like a completely different voice: it's a little thin in tambre (but not breathy), very bright, and just generally not what I want. I'd love to bring some of the richness of my chest voice into my head voice, but I'm not sure how to. 3. The dreaded vocal break. I definitely have it, and it's very noticeable. What are some good exercises to smooth this out? It tends to sound a bit like a yodel, but there's still a patch of graveliness when I make the switch, even if I slow down the exercise I'm doing. Being able to switch seamlessly between my two registers would be absolutely ideal! 4. In general, I tend to break fairly easily in my head voice. I know this is probably a matter of strengthening my breath support, but in particular words that start with a vowel or glottal stop have a high tendency to break and/or crack, and so far my only real method is to just very slowly go through the vowels while in my head voice, but I'd love if there was a better set of exercises I could do. Songs I tend to sing for practice on these things include Stone Cold (Demi Lovato), Praying (Kesha), and more recently Who You Are (Jessie J). They all have a lot of runs and switching between the registers, and I'd love to be able to sing them and have my voice sound like one seamless, well-mixed register. Any advice is appreciated! (And if I can, I'll try and get a vocal recording up one of these days if it's easier to hear what I'm talking about.) -LJ
  5. I have played piano for a while and last year began singing along with it. I have always liked singing for fun, but lately I have been getting more serious about singing. I found out about the elusive but magical "mixed voice" and have been trying different methods I have heard to get my voice into mixed voice. I finally got it a couple days ago and could feel it in my chest and my head, but something sounds very wrong with it. It sounds like vocal fry in the sense that the chest voice part of it cuts in and out like popcorn popping. I am wondering if there is any way to fix this? Or should I just keep practicing, doing scales, etc. until this sound stops and the mixed voice is nice and smooth? I I am unable to post any link at this time, but I might be able to tomorrow if it would help. (Also, sometimes I notice that it sounds like my head voice is an octave higher than my chest voice??? even though I didn't think this was possible.) LINK TO WHAT IT SOUNDS LIKE: https://soundcloud.com/nevergiveup123-1/cracklinghoarse-mixed-voice It sounds like I am straining, but I am not, it it comfortable singing that, it just sounds horrible.
  6. Hi fellow vocalists! What is this thread? Why? I am starting this thread as a place to compile different trusted online teaching resources on how to begin training your falsetto or head voice both for myself and for other people looking for a one-stop shop list of this topic. What is your skill level and experience on this topic? I have been studying and training my full voice all semester and want to finally begin adding this skill to my vocal toolbox. I have a very basic sense of head voice to full voice just because of my musical background but other than that I have little to no education or experience on the techniques, practices, standards, and healthy conventions of the use of falsetto singing. Thank you guys for your help in populating this thread.
  7. As far as Im aware I have a pretty average chest voice range. the highest I can sing are the likes of fear of the dark by iron maiden. Recently I went to see Testament live and understandably I was getting pretty into it. When the singer was saying the typical “are you guys ready” sort of stuff I yelled back “f*ck yeah!” as you do. Somehow I accidentally yelled extremely high and loud (enough for me to hear myself) and I somehow hit this really high note that I have never been able to deliberatly do. Im talking like the trooper and hallowed be thy name range which is really high for me. Its funny because the exact same thing happened to me when I seen Diamond Head live too. Im wondering what made me able to do this so that I can start meaning to do it. Was it just because I was so in the moment and put so much effort into the shout? Or is this not possible? I dont think ive ever tried putting that much effort into singing before due to fear of injury so im wondering if this is what “belting” is?
  8. TLDR: Long story short... what songs would you suggest for a bass which, preferably, doesn't go above E4? (I'm talking about the songs though, I go above E4. I can go up to F#4, G4 sometimes, but I want some rest and actually sing really proficiently in the lessons, not upper belt all the damn time where I strain and push a little cause of the soft warm ups she teaches which doesn't loosen up my voice :/. Am I wrong??? is the teacher right??? I'm a bass and shouldn't be singing in a girl's key??? What do you think about this?? So I took private lessons before with a teacher for a couple months, have stopped taking them for a month or so now, and now I found a new teacher. It's a group lesson with my relatives and some others. I'm the only guy in there. So anyways, she makes me sing in a "guy's key", and whenever I sing in a girl's key, she says it's "not my key" and doesn't want me singing in it. And also, I told her that I can't hit that note, this (guy's) key is too high for me. And she insists that I can. Like no, I've went over the range in that SONG, and my range with my old coach, and I go over my range every single day when I practice. It's either IN my range, or NOT. She picks songs for me without even knowing my own range or that song's. Not only that, but the warm ups we do aren't even for belting. So while the girls sing in their lovely mid range, I UPPER BELT my butt through the song without proper warm up, while the original singer, who sounds either a baritone or tenor, seems to be having a great time. I once sang a girl's song... okay... with some really nice C5 and D5, and C#5 and Eb5 belts. But I sang it an octave lower, and she told me to sing a guy's song next time. What does she think a C#4 and Eb4 is for me? it makes no sense. C#4 is already a high note for me, (my old coach told me about the passagio, I checked mine out and it's around C4, sometimes a note higher) and she doesn't realize that and doesn't want me singing in a girl's key. Fyi, the girls learning are untrained. Vocalizing, the girls start switching to head voice on around C5, I switch to head voice on around C4. Going down? They can barely sing an F3, my lower register is a little better, and vocalized down to D2, and a pushed C2 (I don't train my lower register much). So overall, those FEMALES are pretty much inside my range, y'know what I'm saying? D2-F#4 vs F3-C5, except it's an octave lower, their voices are pretty untrained so their range is much smaller. But if they were more trained, theirs will be similar to mine but an octave higher??? So I'm STILL not seeing why I shouldn't be singing in a girl's key. Passagio is similar and so is lower register, only an octave lower. Another note: There was this girl song that I sang along with, and they told me that it was too low for me. BUT THEN, I SAID, IT'S ALSO LOW FOR THIS GIRL, AND THEY (teacher, and aunt who was taking them with me) SAID BACK THAT IT'S ACTUALLY HIGH FOR HER??? I CAME HOME AND CHECKED WITH A PIANO AND IT WAS AN F3. Tf??? And I know who the singer is, she's a flippin soprano, and they're telling me the 3rd octave is high for her? along with C#5 and Eb5 belts? crazy. Maybe I should've let them try that low note :/. I am upset. I think I'll end the ranting here :/. It may unpleasing to see someone ranting
  9. Hello everybody! So my last thread I asked for help on mixed/ middle register. I have been working on it for a little while now but I still feel like I'm shouting and using too much air on belting high notes. It's as if I'm trying to sing it rather than just letting the sound out. Here is a comparison: and me lol: Any tips or advice is appreciated. Don't know if I'm shouting because I can't get that cord closure properly in my higher registers or if it's a bunch of different things. Woke up a little hoarse today too after singing for around 2-3 hours heavily. this is so annoying Thank you ! Love this forum for all the help I get
  10. So far, I've had a very tiny experience with singing, and it's primarily vocalising or humming. I think my bad experience singing in primary school has repressed my desire for singing for the rest of my childhood and later on in my adulthood. Sometimes I vocalise a tune that I like and experience an abrupt break doing it. I found a video by Roger Love which I think is about fixing this. Roger calls it middle voice, but in other places, I later found it called mixed voice. He presents an exercise for finding that mixed voice, but it isn't very clear to me. I found the same exercise later more clearly in other videos like this. I tried to do it and recorded myself more than once till my performance became more acceptable, and uploaded this track to sound cloud. It sounds to me like the first 2 octaves are not as good as the following ones. Let me know how you find it.
  11. So, it might set fire to an old discussion, but I remember this is something that came up a lot of times in the past. The whole M1 or M2 for the middle/high voice thing, and where it is useful. A somewhat recent study was released with audio samples of a tenor using a very light voice on C5 and D5, and guess what they found? It has body vibrations, so its register M1 I wrote a bit about the subject in my site, here is the published paper: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27430862 Here are the samples And here is what I wrote on my site: http://highlevelsinging.com/index.php/2017/05/01/laryngeal-mechanical-registers-m1-and-m2/ Thoughts? BTW folks if you can read my article and let me know if its clear I would appreciate, I am not native and the subject is complicated enough without the language getting in the way.
  12. She is straining right? or am I wrong :3 2:33 build up to a G5
  13. I have tried searching the internet and forum for clear answers to my questions, but can't seem to find anything coherent. Here are my questions: 1. Does mixed voice (speech level singing mixed voice) belong in classical singing (please specify male and female)? 2. What are the differences between classical technique (male and female), and mixed voice? 3. How can mixed voice be applied to classical singing/teaching? They may seem like generic questions, but look it up yourself, nothing on the web is clear. These need clear concise answers for the world to understand! Thank you for your contributions.
  14. Hello I am not a professional singer but have been singing for about 10 years now, I usually sing for about an hour a day. I sing in a mix of chest and head voice and am female, 27 years old. I try to do vocal warmups regularly but my motivation to do so is low because I have never noticed any improvement either short or long term. The one thing that consistently seems to give me a great voice is having been on a night out the night before. I.e. being hungover, having smoked cigarettes and not had much sleep (and probably having done a lot of shouting). This is bizarre to me for obvious reasons. I cannot think what would cause my voice to improve (better pitch, more smooth) from doing the above and would love to understand so I can hopefully find a way of achieving the same effect without damaging my voice. Thanks in advance for your help, Hanne
  15. I recently discovered the importance of cord closure in singing. It made singing so much easier and accessing the mixed voice feels just so natural and good now. But, it kind of changed my view on breathing in singing. I don't understand if I should just focus on cord closure or actively focus on keeping the breath in the body with abdominal, back and intercostal muscles. Before I worked on cord closure so much, I would focus on what was happening with my torso muscles, but when I started developing good cord closure it all came naturally. My muscles would engage as they were supposed to do and I would feel it and I didn't worry about it. But sometimes, for example when I'm nervous, actively holding the breath with those muscles combined with focusing on good closure seems easier. Then again, at times I feel like I'm holding the breath a bit more than necessary - it doesn't hurt my singing, but I feel good closure could be achieved with less engagement. The question is: should I actively focus on holding the breath in the body with my torso muscles or is focusing on good closure enough?
  16. I've recently picked up singing again after quite a few years, and I've been doing the Mastering Mix exercises by Brett Manning, and I've just been wondering when I should start bridging into mix? As a female. Especially for pop/rock music? Like a newbie I have a bad habit of pulling chest up too high, but I've noticed a comfortable switching point between E4 - G4, is that ok? I think I'm a Soprano, though I can't be sure, but it seems like it. My voice is very light and bright. So I was just wondering what would be a good bridging point for me considering my music preferences and vocal type? Looking forward to your answers, thanks.
  17. I've been having throatiness problems recently. Like, it hurts and I find myself pushing sometimes, when I sing in head voice, or belt too high. It used to not hurt, even when I sing at the end of my range. But now it's hurting. It might be from doing too much vocal slides. Because I've been doing that a lot recently. I used to do it a lot before too. Back then when I started doing it, I started having throat problems too, and I just assumed vocal slides were causing it and I just stopped. And I returned to normal. Also when I went to voice lesson and warmed up, I didn't do any vocal slides and it didn't hurt to sing at the end of my range. But when I went to practice my head voice at home, I did vocal slides, and my voice started hurting again. Any advice on how to cure this? Thanks.
  18. I want to improve my belting range. So far, the highest I can belt is up to an F#5. But I have sometimes belted up to a G5 before. Anyways, I want to improve my belting range, and I want to practice it, by singing songs that are like, at the end of my belt range. So if you guys know of any songs, that have E5-F#5 belts, feel free to comment them!
  19. I have the best edge and easiest mix in my voice in the morning, then on the afternoon I loose the edge and the mix often becomes forced. Even after a long warmup, I still don't find the same edge as in the morning. I don't talk a lot during the days, mostly working in front of a computer. One thing I have noticed earlier was that while working in front of a computer, when I got tired/dry in my eyes my I would lean my head upwards to be able to keep my eyes a little bit more closed. This stretched position of my throat caused a tired voice. Also swallowing and clearing my throat during the day seems to be a big no no. Even though I follow these rules, my voice is still tired in the afternoon.. any more ideas?
  20. Hi everyone i wanna know my vocal register based on my colour (timbre, intensity, etc) i am bass? i am tenor? baritone? There is the link of the file (sorry for my english) https://soundcloud.com/fernando-salvatierra/listo
  21. I just got confused by this https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenor. It basically says that tenor is one of the highest male voice types. So that means that the highest is countertenor? But I thought tenor and countertenor has the same range. And the difference is, tenors are singers who sing more in a male range, while countertenors sing more in a female range. It also says that C5 is the tenor high C. But I remember reading somewhere that C6 is the tenor high C. So I'm confused. And I also know that Wikipedia can sometimes be wrong, because anyone can just go on there and write stuff. So I'll just ask this question here. Idk what tag I should put this in, because I have very little singing and voice knowledge, and Idk what a bunch of those tags mean. So I just put it in chest, head, and mixed voice. Because this question includes those stuff
  22. So you have been searching the internet to find out how to sing those high notes with beauty and power. Well search no more, here you go: The first 10 orders will get an extra bottle in the exclusive mint flavour. Hurry!
  23. Are formants or vocal tract shaping the primary cause for a variation in timbre, and does pitch stem entirely from the vocal folds? Whenever you try to sing in a darker or deeper timbre on a certain pitch do you have to also add more breath support? Or can you maintain that almost effortless feeling while still adding depth?
  24. So yeah, this is me trying to mix high, sorry if it's garbage D:. **recording removed due to robot crabs** And attaching an image showing charts for both examples. Think H5 needs to be stronger.