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Found 20 results

  1. When I looked at Pavarotti's voice on a spectrogram, it almost always have the strongest peak at H3 (third fundamental), sometimes even from as low as a C4, so it's not only on notes at or past his passaggio. I then did the same analysis for a few other well-known tenors and most of their voices also exhibit this behavior. When I looked at my voice I noticed that H3 is the strongest at lower notes, but once I hit B3 H2 starts to dominate H3, the higher I go the weaker H3 becomes. Granted I am a baritone but I can't seem to carry the stronger H3 through my passaggio, so I wonder if there
  2. Hi! Newbie on the site, so sorry if this already been discussed. What do classical singers mean when they say to sing weightless?Here's some of my interpretations: singing in a metallic mode while giving the perception of neutral - no body, non-metallic, "weightless", a sound that uses more support than needed.Following are two examples of "vincero", where the second syllable has the high note. The black and white video has "less weight" in his sound even though it's probably a much bigger sound.Does anyone perceive this with me? How do you explain it?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=944jq
  3. I find it funny how I might be working on a piece with my teacher, and struggling with a part that only goes up to D4, and then I switch genres and I'm happily hitting G4 without difficulty. I almost want to classify things as 'rock high' vs. 'classical high' or 'Broadway high'. I had a piece of music that was killing me that centered around C#4 and D4 that kept going back into my throat, and I had to stop after a few minutes. But then I'm singing Karn Evil 9 by ELP, which is basically 100 G#4's and A4's in a row...and it's not a problem. Does anyone else find this to be the case? What is it
  4. As I've mentioned in other posts, I've been taking lessons for a few months with an opera/musical theater singer, and I've played a whole lot of different singers I enjoy for her to hear her opinion, and I find it interesting to hear the impressions of someone from a different world and different sensibilities. I thought I'd compile all the ones I remember into a collection because I was also curious to hear reactions: Chris Cornell: Disliked. "He's just screaming in the one part. And his high notes are very thin, but he puts all the scream and effect on it. If you heard it without
  5. Currently debating my existence listening to the melismas in Handel's 'See the raging flames arise.' Any tips on melismas in general?
  6. Dear all, It has been a while that I have visited this forum. I have been very busy with my studies—having completed my BA in Musicology and currently finalising my MA in Applied Musicology. I did keep on working on my singing, however. Yesterday, “The Music of the Night,” a song that I auditioned with at the Conservatory of Rotterdam over a decade ago and that I had used for my singing lessons with many different teachers, was one I had never actually performed—until now! Indeed, there appears to be balancing issues with volume between me and the piano. On the other hand, I asked se
  7. I'm a slightly older guy and musician who just started voice lessons for the first time. A big thing my voice teacher is having me do is work on 'lifting' as she calls it. And this doesn't mean lifting the soft palate, which I THINK is a different thing. It involves lifting the cheekbones is a way that's not quite a smile, but somehow allows you to hit high notes with much more ease. Most of the time it's kind of "am I doing it right, I have no idea", but maybe 3 times so far over the weeks I somehow got it, and holy shit I had tenor high c without feeling like I might burst a blood vessel...b
  8. Hi, I am a sixteen year-old classical singer aspiring to study opera. I have a "serious" (I don't really know what qualifies as serious) vibrato problem, and I would really appreciate any advice! I have a wonderful teacher, a former professional opera singer, but she is a bit too nice and hesitates to criticize me, even when I can hear my vibrato issue clearly in recordings of my singing. I'll tell you about my voice, if that info would be helpful. I'm a soprano, range Eb3 to G#6. My voice is extremely loud and very resonant (though sometimes the resonance is a bit nasal in my low
  9. Hi! For the ones that are new to my name, I am Francis. 15 years of age. i like singing classical, rnb and opera. Maybe some rock too. It's been a long time since I last posted and I was like a newbie way back then. And I am coming back with a song of G. Puccini popularized by Luciano Pavarotti. This is Nessun Dorma. http://picosong.com/Sbbw I had a break somewhere at "Il nome mio nessun sapra" and I really want to ask about that. First, about what the title says. What resonation am I using? Is it chest, head, or mixing? WARNING: The very first part of the clip where I was speaking is ver
  10. Hi guys, I'm super new here and I thought i'd start a classical technique thread since no one has seemed to have posted in this sub-forum yet. I'll start with posting a little something I've done. SHOW AND TELL !!!!!!! This was from a few weeks ago. I need to work on my breathing near the end. https://soundcloud.com/arfoo/nessun-dorma-rehearsal
  11. Hi! I'm Anthony, I'm new!! This is a clip from an audition I did in 2009: https://vid.me/n8jg This is a recording I did last year: http://picosong.com/9CTE/ I've never had any training or really performed in front of anyone, other than karaoke and that audition from six years ago. I have massive stage fright, so it makes things really difficult for me. I'm not even really sure what my voice type is, or what genre would suit me. I've been told I'd be good for Broadway or opera. I'd like to get some feedback and see what I can do, musically. Thanks!! - Anthony
  12. Hey guys, I'm new here. I started singing class just 6 months ago and 4 days ago I took for the first time "the stage" to perform Stars from Les Miserables. I'm sorry if I'm shakey sometimes, but it was my first time performing in public and I was really nervous. What do you think?
  13. I found this cool web site that offers bed tracks for Classical arias and art songs! Check it out! http://www.virtualorchestra.eu
  14. Introduction In the Opera world, one of the most exciting things to anticipate and hear is the brilliant, climactic high note of the tenor soloist in an aria. Not only does the voice carry well without amplification, but takes on a distinctly thrilling, impressive quality of resonance that other parts of the voice do not quite have in the same way. In this post, I will explore the ways that these fine singers manage their voices to enable such singing. Since we will be objectively discussing vocal tone quality, I will be using spectragraphs to assist. With some of these parti
  15. I have decided to copy and paste Wikipedia definition of " SPINTO". I have had many people online and in this forum write. Telling me they are Spinto, upon listening to their voice sample however. It becomes clear they mis-understand what Spinto is. I have also had a few suggest I'm not a Spinto which indeed I am. They seem to confuse Tenore Leggerio with Tenore de forci. I am merely copying and posting this definition as I find it accurate and well worded. Some have suggested my voice is heavy for Tenor, It is proper for my Tenor type. I am going to organize full discription of voice
  16. Introduction Of all the dynamic effects used in singing, one of the most challenging to do elegantly is the 'messa di voce' (pronounced by English speakers more-or-less like 'mess ah dee voh chay'. :-) It is the combination of a smooth crescendo (getting louder) for some amount of time, followed by a smooth decrescendo (getting softer) for the same amount of time, on a single vowel, on a single note. Using musical symbols, it can be represented this way: Why is this challenging? The exercise requires that the singer be able to:
  17. Hi all,   I've just signed up to see if you could let me know what you think of my recordings on my website - www.davidirelandsings.com. They're not great quality, but it'll be nice to hear what you think!   All the best,   David
  18. I would like to share with the singing public my own struggle with changing styles and sound from opera to pop. I teach from my own experience. I may be an expert today, but I am never far from my client's struggles and frustrations. It doesn't matter who the singer is, everyone at some point in their career has struggled with their voice in some way. Early on, even someone as gifted as Celine Dion had her own fair share of struggle with a tongue that wouldn't quit pulling back when singing, trapping her higher tones. (The culprit: her native language). Then there are those f
  19. Uhm, hey there! It's been a long time since I opened my acc. in this website, for I'm enjoying my current singing career. So, I'm in a choir right now and I sing baritone or high bass/low tenor. My range for now is G2-G4. I can execute a E2 in a volume of a singer's chest voice. Btw, I've been singing opera lately, (for about 6 months) and I am classified as a baritenor by my instructor. My range in opera was from a brief A2-A#4, 2 octaves and a semitone. Hahaha And I've been wondering if Rock singing could help me extend my voice up to the extent of my cords. I watched videos of connecting t
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