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Found 61 results

  1. Years ago this WAS the best forum for singers and teachers. Those wishing to learn and those willing to help and those who just want to discuss their thoughts on singing and training.. There is still a need for this forum and a community to belong to and interact with. I was here when the community was thriving and when things declined. There are two main issues that singers have to deal with. Egos and rejection. The thoughts of "Am I good enough?" and "Who has the right to tell me I am not good enough". No one has the right to tell you that you are not good enough. But, everyone does have a right to their opinion, and opinions differ. Some people will have a more pleasant starting sound than other people(according to "Popular" opinion) and people have different issues vocally to deal with. Not to mention the different purposes for wanting to improve and the different applications. So, when you ask "Am I good enough?" You will get opinions that you may not like and you may get opinions that would make you believe there is no improvement needed. The FACT is that your voice is constantly changing and keeping up with the changes and making improvements takes work and practice. Any state that your voice is in right now can and will change with time and the way you choose to develope. The problem arose with people arguing opinions as facts. Just because you like or dislike something or believe something does not make it a fact or correct. Letting other people express their opinion without challenging it will give yourself different ways to deal with issues that you may have with your own development. To that extent and also, Giving advice and expressing your own opinion will give you insights on how you yourself feel about your development and other ways and things you can do to improve your own vocal skills. Back to the topic of this post: Do you want to continue with this forum and give and receive advice and engage in conversations about vocal improvement, heath and how things work for vocalists and why they work or do not? YOU, who or whom ever you are, need to take part for this forum to continue and grow and be great again.
  2. Hey guys. So I've been singing for some years now. I'm classicaly trained, theoretically a tenor, but I could never manage to understand and make the adjustments to go higher than F4 without breaking into M2 or straining a lot. Last year I started reading a lot about voice physiology and learning contemporary singing technique. Now I can go sometimes even up to G5 (not a pretty singable tone yet, but it's there). From Bb4 up I can somehow manage a lighter sound that doesn't sound like M2, but between E4 and A4 I can only do full-on belting or something lighter but with a lot of constriction (arytenoids I guess). I'm trying to achieve a lighter and freer M1 (mixed?) sound in that range, and so I've been reading and watching many YouTube videos on that, but I'm very confused with the way scientists and vocal coaches differently name the registers and stuff, so it's being hard to clearly understand what they mean and choose a way to approach the matter. I have to say that I personally think the names Chest, Head and Mixed Voice are terrible and extremely misleading, and they did nothing but prevent me from moving forward. Understanding the vibratory mechanisms and the filter/resonance adjustments is what really is helping me evolve. And although I understand a lot of people don't benefit from scientific explanations, it's really works for me. From what I understand, SCIENTIFICALLY mixed voice can be either: 1. M1 with less vocalis contraction and more nasal airflow/rhinopharyngeal resonance, as used by man and women in contemporary music and by men in high notes in classical. 2. M2 with more rhinopharyngeal resonance and twang in the higher range in contemporary singing. 3. M2 with more rhinopharyngeal resonance in the female first passaggio in classical. And head voice can refer to: 1. any sound in M2 2. only M2 with cartilaginous adduction Now I'm really confused with how vocal coaches use the terms. For me, the sound of what many demonstrate as Head voice - specially those who don't count falsetto as Head voice - is not M2 at all, but rather my first description of Mixed voice (less compressed M1 with rhinopharyngeal resonance). Which makes me think, when they say head voice they are referring mainly to head resonance (rhinopharynx) and not to the vibratory mechanism M2. So although many exercises for bridging/mixing/blending DO go from M1 to M2, and this is of course also used in actual singing, the "bridging" that happens most of the time in the mid-high range is simply the adjustments to go from M1 with oral resonance to M1 with nasal resonance, to allow the laryngeal tilt, less compression and lower subglottal pressure without breaking into M2. I'm still beginning in the science stuff, does anyone with more knowledge in that area agrees, disagrees or have any other thoughts on the subject and on how I could approach a softer sound between E4 and A4?
  3. Hey what's going on everyone, A couple of years ago I decided I was gonna pursue singing a bit more beyond humming on the bike. At some point I started messing around with putting feedback and reverb on the mic, putting my headset on and harmonizing to a drone. Recently I started noticing a bit more how to surf the waves of just intonation and that gave very liberating sensations. I want to share a small segment I did. A big chunk is not just, but there are moments where I was surfing it. While performing I knew exactly when I was nailing it and when I was clashing. I would love to learn more about singing and expend my horizons, and maybe people can point out how I can improve. I'm open to criticism. Thank you in advance, Ben
  4. I heard this on the radio and thought I should post it here! I really enjoyed them! Both talks touch on related aspects of vocal training, vocal science, and vocal "ideology." Hearing Color https://ideas.ted.com/the-sound-of-color-neil-harbissons-talk-visualized/ Synthetic Voices https://www.ted.com/talks/rupal_patel_synthetic_voices_as_unique_as_fingerprints?utm_campaign=tedspread&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare
  5. https://youtu.be/FxZZwxR6hyk https://youtu.be/M5ymDCllhd8 https://youtu.be/fKmR38DpgkA https://youtu.be/9EHat-NCseY I need to know if I sound good in tone and where I need to improve(vocal analysis). Also I don’t know if I’m a tenor or baritone.
  6. I've been really struggling determining my voice type. I've been singing since i was young but it was only the past year where i started being concerned with technique, agility, range, etc... I know i am not the best singer but it would really be great if someone will try to classify my voice and help me develop! My lows notes usually is from C#2-B3 but it can also reach B1 (vocal fry), I my voice starts to crack somewhere in F4 and G4 idk if i start transitioning from chest to mixed here but i know my voice switches into something else in this part. Idk where my head voice starts but it can reach up to G5. My falsetto can go as high as C6 sometimes Eb6 or higher but it's really hard and sounds very weak if i try to go higher than C6 and my whole voice gets tired and uncontrollable after overutelising it. Idk if i am resonant or if i have a good support. I'm not sure if i'm doing runs properly. Also, idk if i'm singing healthy. Self learning is hard ughhh Very high falsetto: https://soundcloud.com/user-935041544/img-2954 Comfortable falsetto: Me singing:
  7. I decided to run a little experiment and (for the first time in my life) analyze exactly what notes comprise the M1, M2, and what I'll call M3 regions of my vocal track. Just for fun, and to share with some of my fellow voice geeks here. Even though I received effective vocal coaching, it was a long time ago when popular vocal teachers did not bother explaining or analyzing anything unless you were willing to sit there and pay $80/hr. to chat (never happened for me). As a result, I never paid too much attention to notes and my "range." I would always reference songs my vocal hero's were singing, and I could tell my M2 notes were getting beefier from the vocal instruction / training. It is interesting to note that, after so many years of singing without strain in M2, I actually forgot how to pull chest voice. I discovered this one day when someone asked me to explain to them how I was able to sing "tenor notes" when they knew I was a baritone. I started to explain the difference between M1 & M2, I wanted to sing an example of straining to sing a high C. We all had a laugh as I struggled to remember how to pull M1 that high without singing in M2. So, lately I've been contemplating expanding my range a tad higher than I've been satisfied with for so many years. The pdf illustrates what I found out about my "instrument." I thought it was interesting to see how much more agile my M2 is than my M1! The overlaps are also interesting for me to see correlated with the notes. I'd like to start training those weaker M2 notes. I'd like to see if I can change the pink D#5, and A5, to red! Only two notes yet, I know it will take a lot of effort, those notes are not easy to make beefy. MY VOCAL TRACK ILLUSTRATED.pdf
  8. 2 years ago I caught a cold and developed laryngitis as a result.. Due to my ignorance at the time, even tho I could not talk, I still managed to yell.. I remember exactly how it felt when I would do this.. like I was forcing my voice up, past my chest and throat, and through, from the top of my head.. You can only imagine the damage I caused doing that.. well, fast forward and to make a long story short, I was diagnosed by an ENT with muscle tension dysphonia. He placed me on 8 weeks vocal therapy and in that time I had improved greatly (90-95% back normal) .. The tension began to return after about three months and this time I had "uneven vocal folds", indicating the begining of vocal nodules.. so back for another 12 weeks of therapy I went, next follow-up and the nodules were gone.. However this time around my voice has not returned to normal and it's been about 6 weeks now post follow-up. I've noticed I can't even seem to access my head voice anymore . It feels as if I have a board in my head sitting *above my nose but resting under my eyes * and it's physically blocking me from reaching that point (just an visual) this is worrying to me because the head voice, all my life, has been a comfortable and frequent resonance for me. My chest voice is fine and my mixed voice is extremely hard to maintain without breaks and I have no range whatsoever.. Is it possible to "blow out" your head voice ? Even with pitch slides and other resonance and vocal stretching exercises, the effort seems very discouraging.. What sounds like could be my "head voice", really just sounds "broken" .
  9. Hello Fellow TMVW members! Humbling though it may be, I thought I would share a track I'm working on, (Beatles - In My Life) and the vocal "sculpting" process I go through in an effort to record my best performance. (I'd never share unfinished tracks except to friends and in this forum . . . plain vanity) I've had a lot of experience analyzing my vocals for recordings, I never quite knew how to articulate the process I was engaging in nearly as well as after having gone through The Four Pillars of Singing, learning the "talk track" I've heard Robert Lunte utilize across many hours of lecture videos! Once one is familiar enough with these "mechanisms" for mending, strengthening, or otherwise fine tuning a vocal line, the mystery about what to do goes away! Rob's techniques are structured in a simple, yet meticulous sequence that really does create the feeling of having a vocal sculpting tool box! I'm posting this both as a subject of interest to others who may be starting out with this type of challenge, and as a means of accountability for me to complete the process, which has been brutal for me due to inexperience with the recording software. It's good for me though, as I intend to record several old hit favorite song interpretations in the coming months. I'll post my final "sculpture" here for this track when I finally complete it. "Work to be done" on this vocal performance is: Pitchy lyrics / appaggio drop out, vowel mods for best resonance, better phrasing, embouchure brightening, slight lightening of mass throughout, . . . . I'm sure there's more, also, rhythm guitar mistakes, and guitar solo is not quite tight yet, not happy with the effects on my voice yet either. I'm contemplating leaving the last "in my life" line unresolved like it is now. I was trying to sing that last half of the last line and had to quit recording due to a leaf blower. I think i'll like it that way, maybe with a high harmony over the top. Lastly, I may end up using a different mic than I did for this take. One thing that clearly gets hammered home in this process is that performing live is a far more forgiving environment than being under the microscope of a recording. Peace, k
  10. Something I have been thinking on lately. I really see good basic, supported, open throat singing as the real basis for good rock singing. I see a guy like Paul Rodgers being almost the ideal base model. Learn that base and THEN add on or go into other directions such as Plant/Cornell As far as actual difficulty or skill level of various classic rock/metal singers, I see it sort of as follows starting from "easiest" to hardest: (of course, ALL of these guys are great and all of it is hard to get close to!) Paul Rogers-----> Robert Plant, Chris Cornell, Rob Halford, Geoff Tate-----> Bruce Dickinson, Dio My reasoning: Paul Rogers has a great tone and in general he "just sings". He doesnt go out of his way to do anything fancy or overly impressive, yet he does sing with a nice tone through a decent range Plant, Cornell, Halford, Tate. These guys are more varied and may generally have a higher tessitura etc, but some of it isnt THAT hard to sing because it gets into a released type of headvoice sound. Some if it can be emulated without a ton of physical effort Dickinson/Dio. Okay, these guys can be ridiculously hard to emulate. IMO you have to actually have the strength built to sing like these guys. ESPECIALLY Dio. This is like bench pressing 315 lbs. Reading a book or finding a "trick" wont get you to bench 315. You have to put in the time and work up to it ITS HARD TO FIND DECENT COVERS OF DIO, EVEN FROM OTHER PROS!!! That says a lot Some of Dios songs are in a higher range than what u might think....yet he still has that beefiness and somewhat "round" tone. You can tell there is a lot of support. Yet when u see him on live clips it doesnt seem that hard for him. Of course by the time any of us heard of him he was at least up into his 30s with a lot of mileage under his belt so he had that technique and strength down solid So that leads me to this video where the guy shows 2 approaches to singing "Rainbow in the Dark" To my ears, the first version is way closer to Dio. The 2nd version isnt that close So this is the hard part. Can one get that sound WITHOUT the really strong supported style?? Like the guy in the vid said, he was exhausted by the time he got to the 2nd verse etc. Is it then just a matter of one having to build that strength over time?? Here are a couple of covers by guys that do GREAT covers....but they dont get that close to Dio IMO. to my ear, both of these are a little "lighter" than Dio. So therein lies the dilemma. How to get that powerful compressed sound yet stay sort of "round" yet also still be light enough to sing into decent higher range?? Even good old Ken, who promotes strongly supported singing etc....sounds rather strained while attempting the Dio stuff. Doesnt really sound like Dio at all and this guy. Great singer, huge range etc. 2.4 million subs. Doesnt sound anything like Dio though Felipe gets pretty close, which is impressive since he has to fight his natural accent and sing a second language etc. Felipe's tone is pretty warm generally too AFAIK Jorn is about as close as ive heard and even then there are some slight differences. Jorn seems a tiny bit scratchier whereas Dio could be really clean while still sounding huge So was Dio just a mutant or did he just build great strength and control over time? here he is live. assuming this vocal is indeed live lol Im seeing him using decent support and lots of resonance. In other words it seems as if he is pushing a lot of air up with a generally open throat....letting that air find good resonance up in the head etc, as opposed to physically trying to squeeze with the throat. of course I may be totally wrong lol His speaking voice already had that sort of warm round tone to it so maybe he just got lucky and learned to sing with power with his natural round tone Anyone have any ideas or want to discuss?? Peace, JJ
  11. In this Quick Answer, I talk about how to train to build consistency in your singing voice. Besides an important exercise, I also address the main questions that came up from my last videos about finding your voice and avoiding voice fatigue, bringing it all together.
  12. Hi fellow vocalists! What is this thread? Why? I am starting this thread as a place to compile different trusted online teaching resources on how to begin training your falsetto or head voice both for myself and for other people looking for a one-stop shop list of this topic. What is your skill level and experience on this topic? I have been studying and training my full voice all semester and want to finally begin adding this skill to my vocal toolbox. I have a very basic sense of head voice to full voice just because of my musical background but other than that I have little to no education or experience on the techniques, practices, standards, and healthy conventions of the use of falsetto singing. Thank you guys for your help in populating this thread.
  13. I have a consistent issue that I definitely need to figure out how to fix... My voice isn't that loud to begin with, but the tone of my voice seems to be in a place where it just disappears into ambient noise. It doesn't carry over it like most other people's voices do. When I am in a loud environment (even just a place like a bar or restaurant with a lot of ambient noise), my voice does not carry at all and I find myself trying to speak louder to compensate. Which, obviously, is not healthy. The bigger problem comes in when I'm trying to SING. Without monitors it's just bad. Even WITH monitors, if the vocals aren't turned up pretty loudly in it, I don't sing as well. I unconsciously try to sing louder (because I can't hear myself well enough) which results in a not-ideal vocal sound, my range disappears, and I end up being a bit pitchy as well. In the moment, I don't particularly feel like I'm tense or straining in any way, although I am very much aware that I can't hit half the notes I usually can and I am aware that I don't sound quite normal. When I listen back, it clearly sounds like I'm trying to be louder, not quite like I'm yelling but in that direction. What is the core issue here, and how might I go about fixing it? I need to be able to hear myself better, and of course having a better monitor setup will help. But I really need to be able to hear my voice over simple ambient noise so that even in a less-than-ideal monitor setup, I can still sing well. And I have no idea what the true problem is that's causing all of this. Help!
  14. Was doing some reading today and ran across a blog by a student of Berton Coffin (original blog post) https://lloydwhanson.com/formants-made-easy/placement-versus-formant-tuning-using-vowel-mirror/ Evidently Berton had a sort of home made device he used to more or less blow a tone into the students mouth and then the student practiced shaping the vocal tract until the tone resonated the loudest etc Sounds really cool and I can see some nice applications for it. is there anything like that commercially available or is there any other easy way to get something like that going?? On the blog post, Lloyd Hansen said he had a tuner hooked up to a small 2 or 3 inch speaker and he just held the speaker up to his mouth etc. I think he called it a "vowel mirror" but he also might have called it an Echophone. any ideas?? Thanks, JJ
  15. Hey guys. Any suggestions on how to clean up my chest and head? It feels and sounds like extra thick vibrations toned in with my notes. Almost like i have half my chords workibg and the rest kinda just adding flapping flavour. I can hit clean chest/head notes but usually just when hitting notes/chords. Not when singing songs. My falsetto is clean though and has none of this extra beef. Thanks. Rich.
  16. Hey all. Just curious if any research has been done on methods to assist resonation that would then increase nonassisted vocal range? More specifically mechanically. For example, if i place a headset on my throat will my vocal corda ability to vibrate change? Or if i practiced with helium would the workout change my ability to sing higher without helium?
  17. I've gotten really good at pulling chest but I think for long term success I'll need to find a neutral position to sing in and eliminate strain. So my question for you guys is how do you make sure you can put in the right amount of effort to keep the breath flowing and not have the throat clinch up. What I've been doing to practice this is not pushing myself at all just trying to breathe and remain neutral and let the tone and the notes come, if they don't come I either go falsetto or change the note of the song I'm singing. I still feel like strain and reliance on the throat can creep in though maybe not enough to cause hoarseness but probably enough that it's not allowing the breath to support the cords and limiting my voice to one certain timbre and volume. I think having a breathy tone is a better starting point than having a solid tone because at least then you know the breath is flowing and from there you can work into a solid tone to keep stamina reserved. Just a little discussion on the topic of strain and remaining neutral I feel will be good.
  18. Sorry about word timing... Still not sure how to swing the beats on this old song ... to make it more lively ... need to sing it for a wedding! Any suggestions for improvement would be so great, i.e. mixed voice, head voice, & chest voice form a coherent one voice? Love & peace
  19. Hello, I have been learning the various voice registers & applying to this song. Any suggestions on where to improve would be greatly appreciated, i.e. Do it sounds like one voice? or not yet? Love & peace
  20. https://www.smule.com/recording/bette-midler-wind-beneath-my-wings/1088277799_1483226920 This is a warts and all presentation of my singing. I tried a different intro to Bette Midler. Be interested to know whether you guys think that is works. I was going to re-record correcting any vocal errors but i feel to get the best from a review I need to show where I'm actually going wrong as well as the well-executed parts currently I have quite a poorly chest. Any thoughts on speeding recovery? Thanks guys.
  21. Dear all, It has been a while that I have visited this forum. I have been very busy with my studies—having completed my BA in Musicology and currently finalising my MA in Applied Musicology. I did keep on working on my singing, however. Yesterday, “The Music of the Night,” a song that I auditioned with at the Conservatory of Rotterdam over a decade ago and that I had used for my singing lessons with many different teachers, was one I had never actually performed—until now! Indeed, there appears to be balancing issues with volume between me and the piano. On the other hand, I asked several attendees whether they felt there were problems with it, but they all did not notice them live. While I do think we could work on balancing our instruments, I believe the recording is augmenting the issue quite a bit. I am really satisfied with the performance—especially my acting abilities, intonation, enunciation, and stage presence. I could be more confident with the fermata notes just doing them as long as I want, rather than thinking I might do them too long (I think the “soul”-note [2:32] is great, the “be”-note [3:44] is just about right, the ”night”-note [5:20] is executed pretty well, but could easily be five seconds longer). I could also definitely stabilise and pronounce my “ring” more. Manolito Mystiq
  22. I had mentioned this singer "Chris Stapleton" in another thread. Thought I'd share this video/song he recently published. I was really struck by the numerous examples of solid vocal athleticism that arise in this performance. I try not to overanalyze every good vocal too often, cuz sometimes I loose the "soul" of the song in my ear from all of the deconstruction I use to understand the vocal. Couldn't resist on this one. Still "hearing the soul" to date. I've tagged all the key words that I believe I recognize "done well" in this composition. Personally, I'm most impressed with his mastery over what I would assume are the critical configurations which bring great resonance with comparatively low level respiration. I'm convinced that, with the best possible formant, combined with the strength support of skilled appoggio, the "illusion" of a belt is created. He is singing at a relatively low volume yet, the intensity of his voice is sustained. The same nuance is applied to his vocal distortion, which he employs mostly in the higher notes. Those are my impressions.
  23. https://www.smule.com/recording/eva-cassidy-wade-in-the-water/830708093_1214803719
  24. Hi Folks, I came across this video on youtube that advocates a support based singing technique(based on what I understood) that can eliminate vowel modification. Can folks please weigh in on how this works? Is it possible for a tenor to sing upto B4 using this technique and get a dark colored sound without vowel modification? Can someone tell me what is the physical sensation that best in your mind describes, "leaning into the sound". Thank you..