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  1. An excerpt from the 2nd webinar with Robert Lunte & Draven Grey. In this excerpt, Robert Lunte explains his unique perspective on support for singing. There are two sources of support when singing. When we understand that, doors will open to reveal the need to train the musculature for singing.
  2. An excerpt from the 2nd webinar with Robert Lunte & Draven Grey. In this excerpt, Robert Lunte explains his unique perspective on support for singing. There are two sources of support when singing. When we understand that, doors will open to reveal the need to train the musculature for singing.
  3. Robert Lunte from The Vocalist Studio provides an overview of the significance of the Bernoulli effect in singing and how understanding this principle, can help you to train more efficiently and gain more progress as a singer. This excerpt is from the 2nd webinar with Draven Grey.
  4. Robert Lunte from The Vocalist Studio provides an overview of the significance of the Bernoulli effect in singing and how understanding this principle, can help you to train more efficiently and gain more progress as a singer. This excerpt is from the 2nd webinar with Draven Grey.
  5. I had mentioned this singer "Chris Stapleton" in another thread. Thought I'd share this video/song he recently published. I was really struck by the numerous examples of solid vocal athleticism that arise in this performance. I try not to overanalyze every good vocal too often, cuz sometimes I loose the "soul" of the song in my ear from all of the deconstruction I use to understand the vocal. Couldn't resist on this one. Still "hearing the soul" to date. I've tagged all the key words that I believe I recognize "done well" in this composition. Personally, I'm most impressed with his
  6. I am really struggling to improve the legato feel of my singing. I came across a post that says excessive air and breath pressure will be counterproductive for smooth legato. What extent of breath is required for various pitches(High, medium and low), to lets say sing the same duration? Also, to what extent transition through passagio is related to breath pressure
  7. I believe I am using too much air while singing clean vocals, this is great for when I want a breathy tone and when the song calls for it, but the thing is I don't know how to cut back on the air without letting my voice distort. Whenever I cut back on the air, vocal distortion kicks in, and my vocals get a grunge like rasp tone. I've discovered that whenever I sing anything above F#4, I can't sing it without vocal distortion kicking in. I don't believe it's an issue involving breath support, because I can sing all the way up to A4 comfortably, even though I can only sing above F#4 with a
  8. have heard the song a million times. Never payed attention to the breathing but once you hear it, you cant unhear it lol Is it normal to have this amount of breathing. Could he have gotten by on about half that amount of inhales? Ooh, mama Well (breath) look what's been done (breath) You can only see the stars After a (breath) setting sun (breath) You (breath) run for the money (breath) You don't even know about wild (breath) mountain honey it especially strikes me as odd to have the breaths right in the middle of phrases such a
  9. This is one area of singing that has always confused me a bit. I've been studying and practicing for about 4 years now, and I am a decent singer with power throughout my range, but my voice can be inconsistent, and I believe that the main issue I'm having is with breath management. It's one of those things that I know is important, but I don't quite know enough to apply it effectively and consistently. The reason it confuses me is that I have read many different things about "proper" breath management/support for singing, and it just seems like there isn't much consistency with vocalists and t
  10. Hi, I'm practicing since a year now. And I can sing quite good now. But whenever I perform in public, most of time I feel my voice very shallow and hallow kind of. I find certain strength lacking in my voice. When I practice alone, and with my friends, then I'm OK. I feel lake of connection when singing in public. Even sometimes I hit wrong notes, which sounds weird. I don't get too nervous, at least physically. I don't shiver so I'm unable to find the reason of this. Please help me out. What kind of practice should I do to rectify this problem. Thanks is advance!
  11. I know how to apply breath support and I generally believe in its usefulness. I can feel the sensation of release when doing more intense singing and it seems like there is a change in resonance according to how I'm applying it. At the very least, I feel more confident when my voice is supported so there is a psychological benefit. But what is actually occurring in the body mechanically that produces these effects? How does breath support appear to reduce tension and alter resonance. What are the mechanics? Does air inhale lower into the lungs and does this create a different kind of vacuum fo
  12. Hi, I have an obstacle when adopting apoggio breathing while rehearsing singing. After only a handful of exercizes, tension begins to build up in my upper back. Not my lower back but my upper back. It has been this way for weeks now. Can anyone help me overcome this? Thank you very much. Sincerely, Jay Peek
  13. Many teachers will tell you to squeeze your bum cheeks to eliminate strain and to sing higher notes. What do you guys think of this technique, does it work?
  14. Learning to sing and perfecting your voice can be a daunting task. Sometimes i feel like i cant handle it and i feel down without any will to continue, but the very next day all those clouded emotions go away and i get back on track. Sometimes the "dark" periods are longer and they get to me more.   To me, Love i feel for music and singing is what drives me forward and can turn the tides even in the darkest of days.   I was wondering what made you guys go on? How was it for you from day 1 until now. What did you do when having bad days or did you ever feel like that?   Eve
  15. Hi Everyone! Now that winter weather is upon us, many of you will be turning up the thermostat to keep your home warm and comfortable. If your heat is turned up too high, you will be drying the air in your environment. Dry air will dry your throat and vocal folds. To remedy this problem, I am suggesting that you use a hot steam bacteria killing vaporizer unit. You will definitely feel the comfortable and soothing heat that is moist. You will especially feel this wonderful moist heat at night when you sleep. I suggest that you close the door of your bedroom to keep the nice mo
  16. Good singers are often described as having a unique personal style, a special way of expressing a song. But in the larger picture of singing, let's talk about vocal styles in general. First off, you want to be clear on which style you sing the most. Pop, rock, jazz, country, blues, R&B, classical, folk, gospel, Broadway belting or perhaps a combination of one or more of these styles? I frequently encounter singers who think they're singing in a pop style but are actually singing in a classical style because of prior training. It can sound quite strange and disorienting to the listener to h
  17. Top 10 Tips for Vocalists Students are always asking me what to remember technique-wise when they sing. My approach is to get a technique in your body so that "thinking" about technique is at a minimum. The more you have to think (or even worry) about singing while you perform, the further away you get from singing from your heart - soulfully with intent. Athletes train for many years to be able to rely on their body to support their athletic decisions; it's the same with singing. It may come as a feel (to drop your jaw) while singing higher notes that won't release, or something you
  18. YOUR INSTRUMENT - UNDERSTANDING THE WHOLE VOICE: A 4-PART SERIES Co-authored by Dena Murray & Hilary Canto The series is presented as downloadable pdf files below so that you can easily print them. We'd love you to have a discussion thread here in the comments section. Please add any questions/comments below. We hope you enjoy the series! Thank you Dena & Hilary Left-Click here to download Part 1 Left-Click here to download Part 2 Left-Click here to download Part 3 Left-Click here to download Part 4
  19. Here's a quick lesson on not holding your breath or holding back your breath which is "putting the cart before the horse". and sam smith by request (go easy its live and i learned it about 10 minutes ago.)  
  20. It has always been my understanding that correct support of the diaphragmatic region is a direct result of right breathing. In my experience I've noticed that most instruction has been about manipulating this region of the body in attempts to control the flow of air, unaware that the vocal cords are responsible for controlling the flow and compression. The vocal folds, and proper placement in the mask, have just as much to do with support of the singing mechanism as the diaphragm. Through extensive study and research over the last 15 years, I have discovered a little-known secret. Pro
  21. Urggg, that dreaded cold. If you are like me most humans these days, there are times when you feel like you're a flu magnet. But, there are precautions that you can take to battle, prevent, and flush a cold right out of your system. The following excerpt is from my book, Raise Your Voice Second Edition, to aid you in your fight against infection: Nothing is worse than having to deal with a cold. Many singers refrain from singing (and speaking in some cases) with a cold, due to the fear of damaging their voices. Singing with a cold is quite possible, although uncomfortable. If you use
  22. Many singers can sing like an angel, but have horrible breathing technique, if any. Correct breathing is a basic principle that is often absent in a performance, and that is tragic. If one learns to breathe correctly, they have to ability to greatly improve sound and also expand stamina and range. Also, breathing and relaxation go together like a hand and glove when done the right way. What is "A Singers Breath"? A singers breath is a term that I coined to make this type of breathing distinct from the shallow breathing that we do in everyday living. When a singer takes
  23. As I previously mentioned, the tongue is often a source of unwanted tensions for singers. It is important to be aware of the engagement of the hyoid or digastric muscles at the base of the tongue, near the chin. Just the awareness of their activity helps in loosening their grip. Place both thumbs under your chin and sing an ascending passage. If you feel pressure from the tongue pushing downward, those muscles are getting in the way of efficient tone production. Also, if when watching yourself in a mirror you notice your tongue pulling backward in your mouth, it is being disruptive to good sin
  24. Much is written and talked about breath control for classical singing, and the related tension it can lead to in the abdomen, the jaw and the tongue. I have many enquiries and new students who talk about learning the control required for singing. They seem surprised when I start by getting them to release and de-control. They can be scared of it at first, but many go on to find it an exhilirating experience. So, where does this idea of control come from? Surely it must be all of those old texts, translated from Italian, that seem to hold no place for singing in the modern world? Well, here are
  25. I was playing around various sounds this weekend, particularly on my mid/higher notes and I realized that I could consciously use less air and produce the same pitch, perhaps have it sound "tighter", and hold the note for what felt like a VERY long time.  It used to be that singing a bunch of notes up there would get me a bit winded, and I couldn't hold them for really long durations.  One of the reasons I sang this way was because it felt like I could keep my throat very relaxed.  If I held back the air, almost to the point where it "felt" like I was breathing in, I could hold
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