Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'rock'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • WELCOME & HOW TO GET STARTED!
    • Welcome New Members!
  • SINGING & TRAINING TECHNIQUES
    • General Discussions
  • REVIEW MY SINGING
    • Review My Singing
  • VOCAL GEAR
    • Microphones
    • Recording For Singers
    • Vocal Effects / Processing
  • SEEKING VOCALIST / VOCALIST AVAILABLE
    • Seeking Vocalist / Vocalist Available
  • ARTICLES / GEAR REVIEWS / INTERVIEWS
    • Vocal Gear Reviews
    • Singing Articles
    • Expert Interviews

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Singing Reviews, Programs & Lessons
  • Microphones (Live & Recording)
  • Vocal Pedals (Effects)
  • Home Recording Gear
  • Services For Singers
  • Singing Applications
  • Vocal Health Products
  • TMV World Exclusive Interviews

Categories

  • Product Reviews
  • Articles
  • Interviews

Product Groups

  • UNLIMITED SINGING REVIEWS
  • PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
  • SINGERS TEA & INHALER

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Web Site URL

Found 92 results

  1. Lyssie

    Best vocal course

    Which vocal course is best? (I want sing mainly rock - from art rock, blues rock, swing to heavy metal but too can sing most of music genre) I hear (mostly) good opinions about: Ken Tamplin Vocal Academy and course '' How To Sing Better Than Anyone Else '', Kevin Richards (Rpm Vocal Studio) and course '' Breaking The Chains '' ''Superior Singing Method'' of Aaron Anastasi And '' Singing Success 360'' of Brett Manning What do you think about these courses and which is best and help me 'increase' my voice? - Lyssie
  2. My band, Mannequins By Day performs with two backup singers whom are limited in experience and technical training but have overall pretty good pitch and technique. Due to time constraints, we usually do a separate vocal practice from the rest of the band. These vocal practices have been more or less acoustic and generally are pretty pitch on. By recording our live set, I've found that the backup singers pitch is mostly very off when they are on a mic and monitor set up. Essentially, the acoustic practice isn't translating to the stage. We have solid monitoring, so that's not the issue. I think it's a combination of show energy and not being comfortable with a mic. Any tips to help get these singers sounding as good as they do in the living room on stage?
  3. Hi there folks! I just joined today, my name is Liza Jean (stage name, granted), and I sing for a KC-based rock band. I'm an alto/mezzo and my chest range is roughly F3 to D5, and my head voice is about Eb5 to G5. That being said, I can belt an Eb5 in chest, but it comes and goes, as that area is where my vocal break sits. So I guess I'm here with a few questions! I take singing lessons currently, but I'm pretty certain my teacher doesn't have formal training in the sense of knowing the pieces of the vocal chords. She has her own solo project and usually teaches children, and while we've made some great progress with where my voice was last year, I'm still hitting some roadblocks that I'm not sure how to explain, and that neither of us are sure how to overcome. So I thought I would turn to y'all! So without further ado, I'll try to word these in a way that makes sense: 1. When I initially started working on strengthening my head voice, I did by using a lot of nasal-y 'nya' vocalizing. However, I've found fairly recently that this seems to create a lot of tension in the back of my mouth/back of my tongue. When I sing in head voice, it's hard to not fall into it, and if you put your thumbs under your jaw and right at the back where it curves up, that soft space always feels 'weird' when I sing head voice. The best way I can describe it is like someone's stuffed cotton into the space or similar. I'm pretty sure it's tongue tension but I'm not positive. Thoughts? 2. My chest voice is very deep-sounding in tambre, and pretty warm. Even when I belt, there's still a decent richness to the tone, but once I get into head voice, I lose it. My upper register sounds like a completely different voice: it's a little thin in tambre (but not breathy), very bright, and just generally not what I want. I'd love to bring some of the richness of my chest voice into my head voice, but I'm not sure how to. 3. The dreaded vocal break. I definitely have it, and it's very noticeable. What are some good exercises to smooth this out? It tends to sound a bit like a yodel, but there's still a patch of graveliness when I make the switch, even if I slow down the exercise I'm doing. Being able to switch seamlessly between my two registers would be absolutely ideal! 4. In general, I tend to break fairly easily in my head voice. I know this is probably a matter of strengthening my breath support, but in particular words that start with a vowel or glottal stop have a high tendency to break and/or crack, and so far my only real method is to just very slowly go through the vowels while in my head voice, but I'd love if there was a better set of exercises I could do. Songs I tend to sing for practice on these things include Stone Cold (Demi Lovato), Praying (Kesha), and more recently Who You Are (Jessie J). They all have a lot of runs and switching between the registers, and I'd love to be able to sing them and have my voice sound like one seamless, well-mixed register. Any advice is appreciated! (And if I can, I'll try and get a vocal recording up one of these days if it's easier to hear what I'm talking about.) -LJ
  4. napoleonboot

    Blinded (original Rock)

    Usually I can hear loads of things to work on in my own singing. I can't hear many here, so my suspicion is that I am getting used to my own faults. Happy to have them pointed out to me though (I know you won't be shy Ron). George
  5. As far as Im aware I have a pretty average chest voice range. the highest I can sing are the likes of fear of the dark by iron maiden. Recently I went to see Testament live and understandably I was getting pretty into it. When the singer was saying the typical “are you guys ready” sort of stuff I yelled back “f*ck yeah!” as you do. Somehow I accidentally yelled extremely high and loud (enough for me to hear myself) and I somehow hit this really high note that I have never been able to deliberatly do. Im talking like the trooper and hallowed be thy name range which is really high for me. Its funny because the exact same thing happened to me when I seen Diamond Head live too. Im wondering what made me able to do this so that I can start meaning to do it. Was it just because I was so in the moment and put so much effort into the shout? Or is this not possible? I dont think ive ever tried putting that much effort into singing before due to fear of injury so im wondering if this is what “belting” is?
  6. Posting a few tracks below. If you're interested in working together (singing or rapping) hit me up either in email (listed below) or PM with a sample of your voice. The tracks are unmixed/unmastered so if something sounds off or hurts your ears that's probably it, apologies. Money will not be involved, we're simply two musicians making music together. If we create and publish a project together, we'll split whatever, if any, profits come of it. We'll talk and make a track together. If that goes well, maybe an album. P.S. If you can write/are a decent lyricist, that's a huge plus. https://soundcloud.com/therealwillyboy/pumpkin-invasion2 https://soundcloud.com/therealwillyboy/poopy-butt https://soundcloud.com/therealwillyboy/36-hh (forgive the high notes lmaoo) https://soundcloud.com/therealwillyboy/saasssggg3/s-ok8S9 Email: wyatthobbyistsailors@gmail.com
  7. Kevin Ashe

    GHOST

    I love it when a "new" band with a great new sound emerges! Their not brand new but i just found out about them last night. Just had to share for anyone else who might not know about them. I've posted one song and their grammy acceptance speech which is hilarious! really like their melodic, minor-ish, mystique, and they are most definitely groove maestros!!!!! enjoy!
  8. shectersing

    My voice type - need advice

    Hello, I need some help with my voice type My range is E2 - F4 and my comfortable note is F2, but I cant sing E2 very loud. In the morning I can hit loud D#2 and a bit quiet C#2. My voice is straining on high notes like C4, F4 but I can still sing them loud (the straining is probably because of bad singing technique and not training enough) I used vocal monitor which tells me that I speak in A2 (if that helps). I stated learning the subharmonic singing technique one week ago and now I can hit G#1 with it but I cannot sustain because Im working on controlling it now. I wonder what is my voice type. I am 18 years old btw. Thanks in advance
  9. https://vocaroo.com/i/s0Gs2obsXX6F https://vocaroo.com/i/s1NGptEw3MDQ Bonus Play That FunkY Music haha https://vocaroo.com/i/s0ez1c7deoNU this is more of a deeper voice version of all the small things
  10. Felipe Carvalho

    Highway to Hell - RIP Malcolm Young

    Since I can´t play the guitar to save my life, this will have to do \m/ RIP https://app.box.com/s/uixx0of9tffyqdipds6ckkgjf4wn1ngw
  11. champ10ns

    Everlong - Foo fighters

    Never had any lessons or anything and I'm not sure what kind of voice type I have but I can't sing very high. What do you think about the high notes in this half step tuned down version of Everlong, does my voice sound any good for a song like this? https://instaud.io/1oLW
  12. Daniel Castillo

    Help in developing the grit

    Hi everyone im daniel,l im newbie in this forum, so yeah i started to sing early this year inspired by singers like jonny craig n tyler carter, one thing i noticed about jonny craig is that when he tries to sing high there is a little distortion, this is one of my favorites songs by him, u can hear that grit almost all song, i mean i can sing high but that exactly technique is what is hard for me,im self-taught so i dont have i coach so, i wish u could help me or at least understand it n how to perform it or develop it,
  13. Hi, I posted this a few days ago, but for technical reasons the post was lost. Robert Lunte already kindly reviewed it, but if anyone else feels like giving me (constructive) feedback on singing, songwriting or recording, that would be great. It's a prog rock piece just over 8 minutes long, hopefully you'll stick through to the end (which was the hardest part to sing due to the challenging harmonies). George
  14. We lost another one. Chester Bennington, the lead vocalist of Linkin Park, has committed suicide. He was found hanging in his private home. He was only 41. http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-40676530 I was never a super Rock fan, but this guy's voice made it easy. I remember as far back as 10 years ago, I loved his voice. It had a "robotic" quality to it. Today, I think the style that got him that sound is known as "false cord" singing. Apparently he was pretty great friends with Chris Cornell as well. They did a song here.
  15. Hi to everyone! I've been reading this forum for a couple of years now and always found it very interesting and helpful in dealing with some of my own issues, so I thought I'd post this project that I've got going on. For a long time, I have suffered from vocal tension and inability to sing past D4 without pushing the "chest voice"/ overly-engaging the TA's basically. However, in the last year or so, I have experienced great relief after starting to do falsetto exercises suggested by Anthony Frisell in his manual "Training Baritone Voices". After reading many other sources later on, I have started questioning the usefulness of voice classification, purely from psychological point in the beginning (belief that one is a lower voice and its effect on the voice and singing), but now also physiological (neglecting upper range), especially in contemporary music (pop, rock, jazz, music theatre...). So now, I am writing a dissertation on the validity of voice classification in contemporary music and have already got some interesting answers. However, since there is barely any research done in relation to contemporary music, I would really be grateful if any of the members here, who give voice lessons, would participate. This is the link if anyone is interested: https://goo.gl/forms/uLMWByDMKYv4IWMk1 Thank you and feel free to spread the link if you find it useful! In general, I would also love to hear your opinions on this. Do you think tutors should classify their students and why?
  16. alexc450

    Closer to Mixed voice?

    Hi, so just recorded this clip (No rain)(sorry for the quality, im traveling right now) but I want to know if im using the right technique, and if this is any closer to a good mix voice. Of course, a lot of things to work on regarding the song, but I'd like to know if im on the right track and what should I improve or work on for those high notes. At the end of the clip I also did a small comparison between a very nasal tone and a cleaner tone. Im not sure if this nasal tone is the right way (+ diaphram compression) to get a good distortion for heavier songs? Finally i also attached another clip (Paradise city) which is basically me playing around with this nasal tone quality to see if i get a good result. Thank you very much! cant wait to be singing these songs live:D
  17. Hey guys I'm going to be producing a weekly vocal tip video series starting end of January. Honestly I've never really watched any of these type of series and was wondering if there were any topics people wanted covered. If it's something I have experience with I will be happy to oblige. Thanks so much.
  18. Steven Tyler just gets better and better..... He's probably a god or something or maybe Satan him self.
  19. Hey hey! New song I finished two weeks ago or so. So, from the start let me say that I'm not a typical singer that I think frequents the forums, in other words I'm really not much of a traditional singer at all and I suck lol. I'd perform absolutely awful singing to pop songs or others where there is a huge amount of skill and years of training involved and required. I'm not a trained singer at all, I just wing it and hope for the best. Ok, so with that said: a few friends have said I have a weird voice and way of singing, just something that's a bit different I suppose. I'm very self conscious about it especially when I hear other singers in alt rock/shoegaze bands. When I hear my singing in comparison I'm like "Oh, that's awkward sounding, sounds like sh*t", yet singing like this is very natural for me, nothing forced (I've tried singing differently and it just feels like I'm trying to do voice acting/karaoke or something). I don't really have any singers that I look up to or have influences, just doing my own thing which makes me feel more isolated and unsure. I'm concerned with making sure the vocals are up to par since i'm stuck with em, that they are interesting, "good" (relative term, I know :p), and most importantly that they at least stand out somewhat in a musically pleasing way. Any thoughts / advice / tips / suggestions / or general comments are totally welcome, good or bad. Not really much vocal effects used other than compression and very light reverb on one vocal track or two. No EQing or anything else, I just try to make sure the recording sits in the mix when I first capture it that way I don't need to mix/process later, because I know nothing about mixing and processing especially something as complex and dynamic as vocals. Cheers!
  20. In the world of opera, male singers have much more deep, dark tones to their singing than rock singers do. Even a tenor in dramatic opera might sound like a 'deeper' voice than 90% of all rock singers. For example, this is a low tenor role, but a tenor role nonetheless (singing stars at 0:58) : My questions is, is this more because rock singers mostly consist of thinner, smaller voices, or does the rock style involve deliberately 'thinning' your sound, or at the very least not going for those deep tones classical singers do? I ask because it seems like the vast majority of rock repertoire are 'not my voice', and not even because I'm a bass or bass-baritone, but just a bigger baritone or baritenor by opera standards.
  21. I've been an instrumentalist for a long time, but recently started training with a vocal teacher for the first time ever. She's a classical person, and knows her stuff there, but is flat-out against all breathy tones and dirty tones as impossible to do healthily. Moreover, she's telling me I have a big opera Baritenor kind of voice, completely unsuited to rock/metal vocals, as most rock singers have very thin voices. I wonder if she is right or not (She also says pretty much 100% of all 'those singers' shred their vocal chords and sing over nodules they develop and get surgery or steroids behind the scenes to keep them going - don't know if anyone here would like to challenge the veracity of that?) One of the reasons I went to her was because I had no earthly clue how to do some of the things I was hearing from my favorite vocalists. I could do my 'quasi-opera' voice, I could do a decent impression of Meatloaf and big clean tones like that. But Soundgarden/Chris Cornell type vocals? Nope. Dio or James Hetfield? Not a chance. And death metal cookie monster stuff? No way. I can't even imagine where in your voice that comes from, I seem completely incapable of doing that, or in general putting any hair on my tone at all. I thought I was just missing the technique, but is it possible I just don't have a voice conducive to that type of thing?
  22. stantheman88

    rock band singing techniques

    Hi, I am Stan from Belgium and I play guitar and I sing in a rock band. We play rock music (obviously) and it's pretty 'rough' music. Not like metal rough, but similar like Foo Fighters, Queens of the Stone age, ... . You get the picture. So frequently, my vocals have to go pretty high and loud. Well, I always sing loud and it's already pretty high, which suits our style of music. But sometimes, there are notes that I just can't reach, but I get really close. It's close to 'screaming', but not like metal screams, but more like shouting really loud. For example, it's a bit like Dave Grohl (Foo Fighters) in the chorus of the song 'The Pretender'. So my question is, is there anything I can do to make my voice go that extra step higher? Like warm up my voice, drink a beer before, ... I really have no idea I'm not schooled or anything. But I need like a kick or a boost to go all the way. Thank you in advance Stan
  23. Thought someone might like these. New to me, but some of you may have heard these. Zeppish/Beatlesque stuff from 90s Both of these are versions of the Jason Bonham band. Motherland (1994) was the name they used for the Bonham band after they replaced Daniel MacMaster (who sang on the song "Wait for You") Then in 1997 he formed "The Jason Bonham Band" with Chas West on vox. I have heard that name before, associated with Red Dragon Cartel (Jake E Lee) but I dont think he sang on the album with Jake. Also I remember that he was the singer for some of the "Bonzo Bash" concerts. But I never heard him on an album Chas West is a beast! Distorts a lot like Jay Buchanan of the Rival Sons love it Zeppelin/Steve Wonder vibe Strong Beatles feel (IMO)