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  1. Hey guys, so I've come to bit of a dilemma recently. My private vocal coach whom I've seen for almost ten years now always suggested to breathe through the nose. When I studied clasiccal/opera in college I was told to breathe through the mouth. Went to my private voice teacher with this topic and he said that mouth-breath is an old pedagogical school of thought, and breathe through nose is the proper way. What I was told by college professor: Breathe through mouth because it raises the soft palate and you can prepare your mouth/throat for the onset of the coming phrase. What I was told by my private vocal coach: Breathe through nose because through the mouth dehydrates the vocal cords at a faster rate and you with proper technique you'll have the raised soft-palate/prepared throat without needing to open my mouth. Conflicting articles: Nose: https://www.ceenta.com/news-blog/sing-strongly-with-nasal-breathing Mouth: https://www.oxfordsinginglessons.co.uk/breathing-for-singers-is-different-from-normal-breathing/ Which is the proper way? I admit I do feel the mouth breath sets my vocal mechanism up for the onset of the coming note a little better than nose-breath but mouth breathing does dry out the chords and when I have a four hour gig I can't really afford to do that.
  2. 9 year old Ananya wrote and sang the song. Feedback please.
  3. I'm a teenage singer from Bangladesh. Please review my voice & singing style. Should I start a YouTube Channel? https://voca.ro/i8qSuOq7ST3
  4. What are some suggestions for exercises and repertoire for helping a student gain strength and control in their lower register? Also suggestions for going between chest voice and mixed voice?
  5. What is the best way to talk about the anatomy and physiology of the voice (to any age from elementary-adults) while keeping students engaged?
  6. There’s nothing more intimidating than a blank piece of paper. Starting the process of writing a new song can take just as long as finishing it. So here’s seven tips to help you speed up your songwriting. 1. Work in a group, then alone Having a few people to bounce ideas around with helps the creative process get started. After you’ve got your song started, the democratic process is more likely to slow you down. If you’re writing songs as part of a band, it can be better to go and complete your parts individually once you’ve gotten the overall idea in place. 2. Drink alcohol, then coffee Research has shown that drinking alcohol boosts your creativity, but makes it hard to focus. Coffee, and other drinks containing caffeine, has the opposite effect. For your brainstorming session, loosen up with a few drinks. This works especially well if combined with the first tip, but be careful not to get carried away and turn it into a drinking session. Once you’ve sat down to start writing the ideas you have onto paper, fire up the kettle. 3. Give chance a chance After a long music career, you might find that all of your songs are starting to sound the same. There’s nothing wrong with having a recognisable sound, but you don’t want to get stale. Shake things up by writing different elements of songs onto pieces of paper, such as keys, lyrical themes, and so on. Place them into a hat and draw five at random. Force yourself to use these, no matter how badly they seem to go together. The results can be surprisingly good - and more importantly they help you to think outside of your usual boundaries. 4. Write somewhere different Creativity doesn’t exist in a void. If you want to be inspired, go for a long walk somewhere far away from your usual haunts. The change of scenery, fresh air and act of walking itself can be great for generating new ideas. If nothing else, it gives you a chance to let yourself relax. Stress is a major impediment to creativity. 5. Learn your music theory I don’t care how unappealing this seems. You might think that learning theory chokes your freedom or that it’s boring. However, if you don’t know what the rules around music are, it’s impossible to break them in a way which is both purposeful and well-executed. This applies no matter what genre you’re in. For example, my own personal foray into EDM was vastly improved when I started learning about cadence, a concept from choral music. 6. Steal from other songs Now let me just clarify something before we go any further. I am absolutely not telling you to copy somebody else’s song in it’s entirety and try to pass it off as your own. That’s not songwriting, and you’re unlikely to get away with it for very long. What you can do, is jot down interesting chord progressions, licks and lyrics. Playing around with these later, such as using inverted versions of the chords, trying it in a different key or modulating can lead to something brand new as the changes you’ve made will lead to a naturally different conclusion. 7. Use good notation software Writing music by hand can take quite a while, and you can’t always check to see if it sounds right straight away. By using notation software, such as Sibelius, or if you can’t read music, just programming the notes into a digital audio workstation (DAW) can transform your songwriting process completely, as it’s quite easy to quickly change sections of your music without having to rewrite every single note. Armed with these tricks, your songwriting skills will change practically overnight. It doesn’t matter if you apply all of them at once (although that isn’t entirely practical) or try them out a few at a time. Your own process is going to be a factor in this, so perhaps some of them won’t be entirely applicable. Don’t fret about this, just do the ones that feel ‘right’ to you. This post was written by Zac Green from popular music blog ZingInstruments.com
  7. How do you find ways to encourage instrumentalists to feel comfortable answering questions related to singing? Examples like: How to chose repertoire for a beginning singer or what kind of vocal inefficiency is there? (Assuming they do not have much experience singing themselves) I have found that it is hard for me to get them to join the conversation during lessons in our pedagogy class. I don't want them to feel like I am calling them out, but I also really want more participation from them in general. What do you all suggest I do?
  8. South African Artist Anna Wolf Wins Prestigious Grand Prize in 2019 Unsigned Only Music Competition Garth Hudson (The Band), Taj Mahal, Aimee Mann, O.A.R., Sanctus Real, Bow Wow, Boney James, Ruthie Foster, and Robert Smith (The Cure) Among Judges September 4, 2019 - -The Unsigned Only Music Competition is pleased to announce its 2019 winners. Unsigned Only is open to all artists who are unsigned to a major record label and gives artists exposure, recognition, and validation for their artistry. A total of $150,000 in cash and prizes is awarded to 38 winners, including an overall Grand Prize winner and a First and Second Place winner in each category. An additional group of Honorable Mentions were also selected. Over the years Unsigned Only has become an important source for discovering new talent. Since its inception in 2012, five Grand Prize winners have been signed to record labels. For the first time in Unsigned Only’s history, the 2019 Grand Prize is awarded to a South African artist, Anna Wolf, for the song “Believer.” Wolf beat out almost 6,000 entries from more than 100 countries to be named the Grand Prize winner. Wolf is truly a compelling and rare artist – a hypnotic performer with passion and style, a singer with hauntingly beautiful vocals, and a songwriter with depth and vulnerability. The winning song, “Believer,” is a powerful track, inspired by Wolf’s desire to break the silence about domestic violence and serves as a personal refusal to become the victim of her circumstance. "I feel such gratitude for this honour,” said Anna Wolf. “The message of ‘Believer” is burnt into every fibre of my being: to let go of expectations, to face my own vulnerabilities and to always keep faith that tomorrow will be the day I get to share my music with the world.” Born in Pretoria, South Africa, Wolf (formerly known as Tailor) has had a celebrated career, amassing hit singles, sold-out shows, South African Music Awards nominations, and a legion of dedicated fans. In 2018, she moved to London, where one night she took her guitar to the bathtub and recorded herself performing “Believer” on her cell phone by stomping her feet against the tub. She sent the demo to producer Pete Boxta Martin, (Missy Elliot, Jessie J, Sugababes), who ended up recording the song. You can still hear some of the noise from the bathtub in the final mix. Apple Music selected the song for four playlists (including Best of the Week, Future Hits, Jump Start and The A-list Alternative) and gave the music video a worldwide release as an exclusive premiere on their platform. More recently, Wolf has released the follow-up single, “Silence,” to acclaimed reviews, dedicating the song to her fans she calls “wolves.” “Anna Wolf is such a phenomenal artist,” said UO founders, Candace Avery and Jim Morgan. “She has so much passion and authenticity, and she needs to be heard. She is an artist who is not afraid to tackle difficult issues and make you feel emotion, and she is one of the most magnetic and inspiring artists we have ever come across.” In addition to winning $20,000 in cash (US) and $40,000 (US) in merchandise and services, Wolf also receives one-on-one mentoring from a group of upper-echelon music industry executives, including: Pete Ganbarg (President of A&R, Atlantic Records); Nick Haussling (Senior VP of A&R, Warner Records); Liz Cohen (A&R, RCA Records); Kim Stephens (President, Forward Entertainment / A&R, Lava Records); David Silbaugh (Talent Buyer, Summerfest); Brinson Strickland (President, Collective Artist Management); and Kristyn Ciani (Talent Buyer, C3 Presents). The complete panel of 2019 judges includes: Aimee Mann; Garth Hudson (The Band); Taj Mahal; Sanctus Real; Bow Wow; Robert Smith (The Cure); The Secret Sisters; Boney James; Gareth Emery; O.A.R.; Janiva Magness; Fred Hersch; Francesca Battistelli; Frank Foster; Aaron Shust; Toots Hibbert (Toots and the Maytals); Ruthie Foster; Tinariwen; Craig Campbell; JD McPherson; Carter Burwell; Zbigniew Preisner; Russ Landau; Josh Jackson (Co-Founder and Editor-In-Chief, Paste Magazine); Anthony DeCurtis (Contributing Editor, Rolling Stone); Mac Randall (Editor, JazzTimes); Marcos Juarez (Head of Latin Music, Pandora); David Sikorski (Senior Editor, EARMILK Media INC.); Lyndsey Parker (Managing Editor, Yahoo Music); Kevin McNeese (President, NewReleaseToday); Art Tipaldi (Editor, Blues Music Magazine); Nigel J. Farmer (Editor-In-Chief, Jazz In Europe); John Dibiase (President, Jesus Freak Hideout); David Silbaugh (Talent Buyer, Summerfest); Angel Romero (Founder / Sr. Editor, World Music Central); Brandon Chitwood (Assistant Director, EDM Joy); Enrique Santos (Chairman / Chief Creative Officer, iHeart Latino); Chad Jensen (Artist Manager, Jensen Artist Management); Brinson Strickland (President, Collective Music Nashville); Deborah Klein (JV Partner and Artist Manager, Primary Wave Entertainment); Kristyn Ciani (Talent Buyer, C3 Presents / Lollapalooza, Austin City Limits, Shaky Knees); Evan Stein (Owner, Experience Music Group); James Kempner (Owner, JMK Connections); Jennifer Taunton (Music Supervisor, Level Two Music); Jessica Cole (Founder / President, Lyric House); and Sheryl Louis (Artist Manager, CSM Management). Unsigned Only is sponsored by Celebrity Access; Eventric; Hybrid Studios; Lurssen Mastering; Merch Cat; Musicians Institute; Musician Wellness; Pro Tour Nutrition; Radio Airplay; Shubb Capos; Symphonic Distribution; The Music Business Registry; and Vocal Eze. Unsigned Only is now accepting entries for the 2020 competition. More information can be found at: https://www.unsignedonly.com. To hear the winning songs, download low-res photos, and view the complete list of winners, go to: https://www.unsignedonly.com/winners For high-res photos, please contact Candace Avery at press@unsignedonly.com. ### The complete list of 2019 Unsigned Only winners is as follows: Grand Prize Anna Wolf (Pretoria, South Africa) – “Believer” AAA (Adult Album Alternative) First Place Adrian Chalifour (Victoria, BC, Canada) – “Head Down Heart Up” Second Place Whitefield (Werrington County, NSW, Australia) – “Ivy” Adult Contemporary (AC) First Place Madison Olds (Kamloops, BC, Canada) – “Thank You” Second Place CAEZAR (Gloucester, GLR, England) – “Hold On” Americana First Place Kenny Foster (Joplin, MO, USA) – “Wood & Steel” Second Place Roger Street Friedman (New York, NY, USA) – “Everyday” Blues First Place Layla Zoe (Victoria, BC, Canada) – “The Deeper They Bury Me” Second Place Teresa James And The Rhythm Tramps (Canyon Country, CA, USA) – “Forgetting You” Christian First Place Avery Blank (Sedgwick, KS, USA) – “Not Over” Second Place Francesca Ani (Tampa, FL, USA) – “Heart On Fire” Country First Place Tyler Dial (Phoenix, AZ, USA) – “Damn, Denver” Second Place Kaylee Bell (Waimate, CT, New Zealand) – “Keith” EDM First Place Krane (Los Angeles, CA, USA) – “Movin” Second Place Friendzone (Salt Lake City, UT, USA) – “Neighbors” Folk/Singer-Songwriter First Place Tom Freund (Venice, CA, USA) – “Freezer Burn” Second Place Clinton Clegg (Pittsburgh, PA, USA) – “Spain” Instrumental First Place Roman Smirnov (Toronto, ON, Canada) – “Kuwaka” Second Place Symphonex Orchestra (Charlestown, RI, USA) – “Dreams In Bloom - The Encounter” Jazz First Place Chico Pinheiro (Sao Paulo, Brazil) – “Flor de Fogo” Second Place Chris Parker (Port Jervis, NY, USA) – “The Chimney” Latin First Place Gio Cadario (Santa Cruz, Bolivia) – “Devuelveme” Second Place Teff (Caracas, Venezuela) – “Te Equivocaste” Pop/Top 40 First Place Cray (Norway) – “Monkey Wants Banana” Second Place Tia P (Inglewood, CA, USA) – “Come Together” R&B/Hip-Hop First Place Alexander Lewis (Los Angeles, CA, USA) – “Pearl Magnolia” Second Place Coco Jones (Lebanon, TN, USA) – “Just My Luck” Rock First Place Fink Tree (Poznan, Poland) – “Love Somebody” Second Place Dogtooth (Glasgow, Scotland) – “Trying To Save You” Screen Shot First Place Bryan Elijah Smith (Dayton, VA, USA) – “In Through The Dark” Second Place Big Little Lions (Royston, BC, Canada) – “Find Your Tribe” Teen First Place Carolyn Hao (Toronto, ON, Canada) – “Losing Count” Second Place Camryn Quinlan (Sayville, NY, USA) – “Monsters” Vocal Performance First Place Rhia (Melbourne, VIC, Australia) – “Crystalline” Second Place Pedro Barbosa (Maputo, Mozambique) – “Crazy Love Is” World Music First Place OYME (Moscow, Russia) – “Vaya” Second Place Kidum Kibido And Boda Boda (Bujumbura, Burundi) – “Nipe Nguvu” Fandemonium Winner (winner selected by online public vote) Corvyx (Staten Island, NY, USA) – “Alive” Grand Slam Promotion Winners Week 1 – Get Exposed Online With Digital Distribution and Promotion Sara (Belgrade, Serbia) – "Player Of Mine” Week 2 – Get Licensed With Your Music Charlie Grant (Totnes, DVN, England) – “Black Lines” Week 3 – Get Published With Your Songs Goodnight, Sunrise (Toronto, ON, Canada) – "WVV” Week 4 – Get Paid For Your Music Dylan Holton (Ottawa, ON, Canada) – "I Used To” Win Some Love Promotion Winners First Place: Kat Beck (North Vancouver, BC, Canada) – “Hooked On Your Love” Second Place: Maham Suhail (Lahore, Pakistan) – "Pauna” Third Place: Angus Brill Reed (Adelaide, SA, Australia) – “Be You” Video Only Promotion Winners Professional Video Winner Tia P (Inglewood, CA, USA) – “Come Together” Homemade Video Winner Matt Ellis (Sydney, NSW, Australia) - “Some People" To view the list of Honorable Mentions, please go to: https://www.unsignedonly.com/winners
  9. Are you in the market for a microphone? Don't say no. If you are a serious vocalist, then you are ALWAYS looking out for the latest and greatest microphones on the market. (And we already know that you're a serious vocalist, because you're here, reading the TVS blog, after all.) Maybe you're already a microphone aficionado, and reading this blog post will be like eating candy for you. Perhaps you aren't yet an expert, and you're wondering which are the best microphones for singers. Whatever brings you here, read on, because this post is for you. If you are a dedicated vocalist studying the TVS method, then you'll definitely want to start training with amplification. That much is a given. So let's discuss some of the different types of microphones out there, talk about a few of Robert Lunte's go-to recommendations, and then check out some of the newest, coolest mics from the recent 2018 NAMM show. First off, basics. Feel free to skip this first section if you're already a complete authority on microphones. For the relative newbies to the world of vocal amplification, there are TONS of different mics on the market, but we're going to briefly discuss a few major classifications today: Dynamic Microphones Condenser Microphones Ribbon Microphones Modeling Microphones Wireless Microphones Read on to find out the some of the main differences between these types of tech. [caption id="attachment_155243" align="alignright" width="238"] The JZ HH1 - A Great Handheld Microphone from Latvia. Dynamic Microphones Dynamic microphones are more commonly used in live settings, on stage. They are generally the most sturdy microphones out there and are usually on the less expensive side. If you have never before purchased a microphone, a decent dynamic mic is an excellent place to start, as they are the top recommended microphones for beginners. Click HERE and use the code: VOCALISTSTUDIO to get a special TVS deal on the JZ HH1. Condenser Microphones The Audio Technica AT5047 Cardioid Condenser Microphone commonly used in studio settings. Typically a bit more delicate than dynamic microphones, condenser mics are more sensitive and responsive, and they offer a more true-to-life sound than dynamics. They can pick up on finer nuances in sound. If you are looking for a microphone to use in a home studio that has some degree of soundproofing, you might want to look into condenser microphones. Ribbon Microphones The AEA KU4 Unidirectional Ribbon Mic Ribbon microphones are a unique style of mic, built around a thin piece of metal -- the “ribbon.” They have a rich natural sound and can capture the glorious tone from old recordings made in the 40s. However, they are often very delicate and fragile and they can be quite expensive. There are ribbon mics out there designed for live use, but they can still be a little more easily damaged than your go-to dynamic mic... so be very careful if using a ribbon mic on your next rock gig, and maybe consider saving the ribbon for studio use only! The Antelope Audio Edge Modeling Microphone Modeling Microphones Modeling microphones are more of a specialty item right now, but they are promising technology, poised to change the way we record vocalists and change the way we even think about mics. These are microphones that are designed to “model” other microphones. Picture a microphone that can recreate either the same iconic sound from the mic the Frank Sinatra used… OR the same sound from the mic that your favorite radio host uses today. These microphones are incredibly versatile. They pair with advanced modeling engines to create killer recordings, and are amazing. The Rode RODELink Performer Kit Digital Wireless Wireless Microphones Wireless microphones are used in any setting where the vocalist needs to be moving around a great deal. Training with a wireless microphone can be incredibly useful for vocalists who need to prepare for work in musical theatre or in any active performance setting. (Think of Beyoncé. Does she just stand and sing in front of a stationary mic at every show? Absolutely not.) Vocalists need to be able to perform in various different settings, with various different microphones, so training on a wireless system can be extremely beneficial, even for a beginning vocalist. Click HERE For Recommended Microphones & Home Recording Gear! Top Recommended Microphones To access the full list of mics that Robert recommends that vocalists use, in order to train with amplification, then you’ll need to pick up your copy of The Four Pillars of Singing. However, we can tell you two hand-picked mics from Robert Lunte’s list: 1) The JZ HH1 & The Sennheiser e935 Dynamic Microphone These are robust, reliable handheld microphones that are reliable and sound great. The e935 has a fantastically balanced EQ, both low and high end. It is also super durable. Definitely should be one of your frontline microphones. The JZ HH1 is unique because it has a great balance of low and high end, but unlike other handhelds, it has an "airyness" or "windyness" to the coloration which I actually really like! This unique element to the microphones coloration gives the mic a hair of white noise. I think this mic is very well suited for rock and metal for this reason. 2) The Antelope Audio Edge Duo & Edge Solo The Antelope Audio emulation microphones are really cutting-edge. Emulation technology allows singers to use plug-ins to capture the unique sound coloration characteristics of 18 of the world's most legendary, classic recording microphones. In other words, you can purchase one microphone system, and get the sound color and characteristics of 18 microphones but just dropping and menu and selecting the emulation you want. VIEW THE VIDEOS BELOW. Make sure to check out the Antelope Audio emulation microphones at The Vocalist Studio Vocal Gear Store! You can also purchase directly from Antelope Audio HERE and use this code to save $50: thevocaliststudio% 3) The Rode RODELink Performer Kit Digital Wireless Audio System The Rode RODELink Performer Kit is a fabulous solution for the vocalist on the lookout for a wireless microphone that is inexpensive. Easy to set up, with a good sound, this system is something to consider if you’ve ever wanted to train and perform with a wireless microphone. 4) Vintage Microphones from the 60s, 70s & 80s Two vintage microphones from Robert Lunte's collection. The Electro-Voice SRO-627B and the Italian RCF MD 2702[/caption] One of the most interesting and fun ways to purchase a microphone is to shop for refurbished microphones from previous eras. Many of these microphones sound great, just as good, or almost as good as contemporary microphones. They are all very rare. Great for microphone geeks and collectors. The industrial design and novelty of vintage handheld microphones is a big reason why these microphones are sought after. Here is a site where Robert Lunte shops for vintage microphones. Reverb. Click HERE For Recommended Microphones & Home Recording Gear!
  10. Robert Lunte & RØDE Microphones present four weeks of vocal training in Germany, Italy and France. April, 2018. For information click the links below or reach out to the people tagged in this post. See you in April! TVS Events Page http://bit.ly/TVSEvents Download The Tour Poster HERE: http://bit.ly/TVSMCTourSpring2018 14-15 APR Ansbach, Germany http://bit.ly/TVSMCAnsbachGermany 21-22 APR Pescara, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCPescaraItaly 28-29 APR Cagliari, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCCagliariItaly 1-2 MAY Nimes, France http://bit.ly/TVSMCNimesFrance If you have any questions about the event or private lessons, contact me on my personal email or here at TMV World. I look forward to helping you with your singing. You will get results, guaranteed.
  11. Microphones from NAMM 2018! Click "22 New Photos" Below
  12. The Carbonphone by Placid Audio is a very unique microphone for anyone who is interested in experimenting with sound. Its military grade carbon granule element captures sound and creates a "lofi" sound that is naturally distorted. Creating sounds similar to scratchy vinyl or an old military radio, this microphone is perfect for anyone looking to recreate a more vintage tone or anyone looking to create something new altogether. Included with the microphone is the Tone Box which provides the current which is needed to power the microphone. While the microphone can be powered by any standard 9 volt power supply, the Tone Box can also shape the sound through a variable five position filter circuit. Each selection on the control knob offers a different frequency response, allowing the Carbonphone to be used on a broad range instruments and for various applications. Because the sound of Carbonphone has a character unlike many other traditional mics, it makes a great addition to any recording enthusiast’s arsenal of microphones. It can be used as an all out obvious ‘effect’ on it’s own or it can be paired with other traditional microphones for infinite blending possibilities. The Carbonphone is a perfect microphone for any person looking to update their studio with new sounds but it is also usable for live performances and with its high durability and great resistance to high pressure sound levels. FEATURES Military grade carbon granule capsule Fully balanced output Quality Hammond output transformer Rugged copper housing and components Powered 5 position variable filter Tone Box Tone Box doubles as a phantom power source Tone Box can be used with other microphones 9 volt power supply for Tone Box High quality Nuetrik 3 pin XLR connectors Handcrafted in the U.S.A Lifetime operational warranty Adjustable aircraft aluminum mounting bracket to fit North American style stands (will fit European style stands with common threaded adapter) SPECS Type: Carbon Polar Pattern: Cardioid Frequency Response: 100Hz ­- 10kHz Impedance: 600 ohms Output: 120 +/­ 2dB SPL @ 1 kHz Mic Dimensions: 1.75 x 5.5 inches Tone Box Dimensions: 5.25 x 4.25 x 2.25 inches Mic Weight: 1 lbs. Tone Box Weight 0.70 lbs. *The Modern Vocalist World is brought to you by The Vocalist Studio, course and training for singers.
  13. The Copperphone by Placid Audio is a vintage character effect microphone. Unlike full range high fidelity microphones, it operates within a limited bandwidth of frequencies which imparts a compelling nostalgic quality on the signal. Some might compare the sound to an AM radio or an old telephone... The sound is achieved through a combination of the microphone’s element and a mechanical filtering device. The element is rear ported into a hollow resonant chamber and as sound passes through the diaphragm into the chamber, upper midrange frequencies are accentuated while low and high frequencies are reduced. The Copperphone can be used as a stand-alone mic on vocals or any other instrument to create an all-out, attention-grabbing sonic effect. Or it can be used in conjunction with a more traditional mic and the resulting signals can be blended together for subtle character and midrange enhancement. Sound samples of the Copperphone on vocals and various instruments can be heard here: https://www.placidaudio.com/products/copperphone/ The critically acclaimed Copperphone is the worlds most popular vintage effect microphone and used by hundreds of professionals and vocalists around the world. Here are just a few notable users: Norah Jones (Norah Jones) Sam Smith (Sam Smith, 2014 Grammy Winner) Annie Clark (St. Vincent, 2015 Grammy Winner) Sean Lennon (Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger, Cibo Matto) Beck (Beck) Jack White (Raconteurs, The White Stripes) Dan Auerbach (The Black Keys) Tom Petty (Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers) Geddy Lee (Rush)
  14. Congratulations to Priscila da Costa. Our new TVS Certified Instructor in Luxembourg. Priscila da Costa trains 40 hours for TVS Certification in Seattle, WA with Robert Lunte. She is now an expert in the TVS Method and is prepared to help singers around the world. https://thevocaliststudio.com/tvs-certified-instructor-program/ I am very impressed with what I saw and heard during your teacher training. You will be GREAT! Super proud and your students are fortunate to have you. Be sure to listen to the last chorus, it is amazing. Priscila da Costa is a TVS Certified Instructor from Luxembourg. This is her original song, "Twisted Mind" that we worked on together in preparation for her EP release and this video.
  15. Don't wait to train your singing, get started now. Stop procrastinating. Too often students want to wait until they have completed the course, read the book and feel the understand everything before actually starting with the physical training. DON'T DO THIS! It can quickly become a subconscious excuse for procrastinating. As you take the course and read the book, you also need to learn via kinesthetics, or learn by doing it, feeling it, hearing it and more.
  16. This is a lesson that gives two simple tips on how to capture a David Bowie vocal color. There is a lot more involved than these two ideas, but this should be helpful. Be sure to view the two performances of "Space Oddity" & "Life On Mars". Learn More: http://www.TheVocalistStudio.com.
  17. An excerpt from the 2nd webinar with Robert Lunte & Draven Grey. In this excerpt, Robert Lunte explains his unique perspective on support for singing. There are two sources of support when singing. When we understand that, doors will open to reveal the need to train the musculature for singing.
  18. Robert Lunte from The Vocalist Studio provides an overview of the significance of the Bernoulli effect in singing and how understanding this principle, can help you to train more efficiently and gain more progress as a singer. This excerpt is from the 2nd webinar with Draven Grey.
  19. You can NOT become a better singer by only experiencing the pleasure of training and singing. Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. Martin Luther King, Jr. To belittle knowledge and the way things work, is a popular tactic that is occasionally seen by some people in the singing industry. It is interesting to note that people who make the "less knowledge and understanding is not very important to learning how to sing", argument all suspiciously have one thing in common. They don't have a product to sell and/or if they do, the offering lacks depth. They don't choose to explain how and why the singing voice does what it does. You will never see CVI, EVTS, TVS or programs that offer some scientific insights publish a video or forum post that makes the claim, "... you don't have to know all that complex stuff, just let your inner feelings carry you through. That's all you need. It should never be hard, it should always be easy. You can just will it to happen. Don't bother learning any of the science of singing"... The world's best training programs will never say that. There are two things that motivate people. Pain and pleasure. Some people like to be given permission to avoid all the pain from voice training and learning how to sing. Promise them that they can learn to sing better without any "pain", ( practice, commitment, doing the same thing over and over again, reading a book, paying attention to a lesson, understanding a methodology, understanding how vowels work, etc... ), and they happily get on board. They don't want any "pain" associated with training or learning how to sing better. They only want instant gratification and pleasure. By no means is everyone like this. However, for those that do respond to that message, there will always be someone there to "sell" it to them.
  20. MAESTRO DAVID KYLE THE WINDOW OF FAME Vocal teacher for all styles for over 50 years, David Kyle, The “Maestro” became a local Seattle icon and was considered by the industry to be one of the best vocal instructors for contemporary singers in the world. Unique to the “Maestro’s” approach was his method for expanding vocal range into multiple “registers”, or what we would refer to today at TVS as, "Bridging & Connecting". Maestro was also keen on eliminating psychological barriers that hinder singers’ freedom of expression, by use of creative visualization techniques and development of healthy auditory imagery for singing. Use of amplification and embracing technology was also an important part of the “David Kyle” training experience that carries over to TVS training with Robert Lunte as well. In addition to these details, Robert Lunte's vocal training program, The Four Pillars of Singing, found at this web site, offers 10 of Maestro Kyle's vocal workouts. Another 22 original vocal workouts developed by Robert Lunte are added to The Four Pillars of Singing training program with slow and fast versions of every workout to accommodate different student's levels of experience. All together, The Four Pillars of Singing offers a total of 32 vocal workouts with 64 different options to explore and train your voice. One day, Nate Burch, one of Robert Lunte's students from Seattle, came to the lesson with an old coffee stained piece of paper that had a hand written, transcribed lecture from Maestro Kyle on it. An excerpt from that lecture is shared below as well as popular quotes that Maestro Kyle used to use with all his students. The complete lecture is provided inside The Four Pillars of Singing Hard Copy Book and training system as part of the tribute to Maestro Kyle that Robert Lunte added to The Four Pillars of Singing. Maestro David Kyle & Robert Lunte - The Vocalist Studio MAESTRO DAVID P. KYLE LECTURE: Those sounds which seem to ring the most are usually the best. Those which seem the roundest are usually the best. Those which seem to resonate are usually the best. Those which seem to echo are usually the best. So listen out into the theater and see if they are echoing, and if they are round, and they are resonant. Connect your notes and don’t be afraid. There are two kinds of stars. There are “stars” and there are “superstars.” The star no matter how he tries he just can’t seem to become a superstar. He’s great, great, great, great, but along comes a Caruso, or a Lanza, or a Gigli, and he can’t quite get over the hurdle. It’s because of one simple thing. The star sings, and when he’s singing he listens to himself; and while he’s listening he shapes it; and he opinionates it; and he shapes it around. If it isn’t round enough he rounds it more. And that sounds logical doesn’t it? It’s wrong! The superstar pictures the sound and knows what he wants to hear before he makes it! Singing is more the concept than anything. If we’ve got the right idea, then the muscles as they train more and more they become like a reflex and the reflexes respond to the image. Even if you’re trained beautifully and your image is a fear that you haven’t got high notes and it’ll never get there the reflexes won’t respond no matter how well trained you are. The epitome of it is you can say singing is absolutely mental. In the process of getting to realize that you have to take a lot of physical steps before you begin to see it, but it is true! The singer has to be in the consciousness and the mood. How does one establish a consciousness and a mood? You tend to become as you act. So if you pretend and try to get your feelings to act as you think they would act if you were doing it, then you’re getting in the consciousness. But if our consciousness is only on body and physical things then our mind is... The rest of the lecture offers another 5 pages of incredible insights about how the mind controls the singing voice. Read the entire lecture in The Four Pillars of Singing hard copy book, eBook & course work at this web site. Maestro David Kyle - The Vocalist Studio The Four Pillars of Singing With 12 of the Key Vocal Workouts Maestro David Kyle taught! Maestro David Kyle Quotes “Good singers sing and listen, Great singers listen, then sing” “Good speech is half sung, but good singing is not half spoken.” “Wear the world like a loose garment. Don’t let it tighten in on you.” “Suppose you were learning to drive a car. Would it be better to learn on a road with no obstructions?” “Every negation is a blessing in disguise.” “The art of the art is the art that conceals the art.” “He who would know aught of art must first learn and then take his ease.” “When you open up you should be able to see light from both ends.” “Feel like you are singing with your whole body.” “Your reflexes respond to your image.” “The reflexes respond to the imagination.” “Listen away from yourself.” “Sing on the balls of your feet, like the American Indian.” “Burn Bridges and don’t look back.” “Listen away from yourself, right out into the auditorium.” “Singing is both a science and an art. All art is all imagination and you cannot fix that.” “You have to believe you will receive before you receive and then you will get it.” “Visualize you are already what you want to be. Act as if you are that, and you will become it.” “If you always notice what you are while trying to get there, you’ll never get there.” “Start as if the sound begins before the breath.” “The end is in the beginning, and the beginning is in the end.” “It’s not a game I’m playing! If you think that you’re short changing yourself.” “People don’t get tired of their work; they get tired of the resistance to their work.” “Forever diet the voice. Diet the voice; diet the mind; diet the spirit; diet everything but your income!” “Feel like your whole self is all a part of the sound, like the full violin is just vibrating.” “Imagine the sound you want, picture the sound you want.” “Open up the entire body and see the light through both ends!” “Breath, pause, release the jaw, visualize the sound you want, and sing to the back of (Carnegie Hall).” “We don’t let attitudes control us, we control them!” “Only babies are victims of moods!” “Let the sound flow right over the roof of the mouth into the masque.” “Bowels up, vowels forward.” “Some day you’re going to stand up and say, ‘This is me’ and go!” “We tend to become as we act.” “Attitude is everything in everything.” “Every time you find your thinking going to the strain or the resistance, immediately create mentally the sound that you want, hear what you want.” “And remember you have a beautiful voice. At your worst you sound better than many of them at their best!” “Just don’t sound like everyone else!” “And tell it your singing marvelous, you’re singing wonderfully!” “Sing Away from yourself, to something.” “Listen, then sing!” “Way to go Baby!” Maestro David Kyle passed on Saturday, November 27th of 2004 OTHER VOICE COACHES OF ROBERT LUNTE...
  21. Robert Lunte, of The Vocalist Studio and The Four Pillars of Singing shares some details about the Audio VX5, condenser microphone. Purchase the Audix VX5 here: http://www.TheVocalGearStore.com. Description The VX5 is a multi purpose, professional vocal condenser microphone designed for live, studio and broadcast applications. With an ability to duplicate studio quality sound on stage, the VX5 has a smooth and accurate frequency response, resistance to feedback and handles very high SPLs without distortion. Designed with a tight and uniformly controlled supercardioid polar pattern, the VX5 helps isolate vocals from the rest of the stage. Other features are a 14 mm gold vapor diaphragm, an acoustically ported steel mesh grill with a multi-stage pop filter, and a -10 dB pad and bass roll-off filter. The VX5 will handle SPLs in excess of 140 dB (with pad and roll-off engaged) and will provide over 20 dB of ambient noise rejection on live stages. In addition to vocal applications, the VX5 is designed to capture instruments such as guitars, woodwinds, brasses, percussion toys, drum overheads, hi-hats and pianos. The VX5 requires 18 - 52 V phantom power. Applications - Live and studio vocals, lead and backing - Speech - Acoustic instruments Please see the spec sheet under the specifications tab for more information about this product.
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