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Found 175 results

  1. Opera singers, classical singers, actors, cantors, preachers and even nowadays rock stars and rappers could gain a great deal from learning one of the most elaborate and sophisticated singing techniques that was invented more than 200 years ago by the Scuola Italiana del Belcanto (translated freely into: The Italian school of beautiful singing). This ancient school of thought has produced some of the most fundamental Opera music and singing techniques that are on a daily basis use by most Opera houses in the world. But , you don't have to be an Opera singer to take advantage of the great benefits the Appoggio technique has to offer a professional vocal user You can learn to master it with an extremely good voice coach or as a part of professional voice therapy design with a voice specialist like me. Appoggio is coming from the Italian word Appogiare which means to lean on What do we lean on when we sing? On air ! Our breath support which is crucial to voice and speech production. Breath support means exactly that, the support our breath is getting before and while we produce sounds of speech or singing using the air that is coming up from our lungs moving our closed vocal cords approximately 100 times per second (Hz) for men, 200 times per second (Hz) for women and up till 400 times per second (Hz) for a child. Many singers and actors (especially beginners or natural ones- that do not attend comprehensive voice coaching as part of their training) are referred to my voice clinic by ENT surgeons after suffering from vocal nodules, vocal cords hypertrophy, detuning and other vocal abuse symptoms mainly because they do not use the correct breath support while stretching their voices to the limit. Simply put, the air support or the breath support for professional voice users like Opera singers, classical singers, actors, cantors, preachers and even nowadays rock stars and rappers should be based on the abdominal muscles. In most cases, state of the art technique for a singer will be MBS = Midsection (abdomen) Breath Support and for an actor the AGIN technique (abdominal breath support while the body is in motion, like on stage). Most clinical professional vocal abuse cases will require an exact Stroboscopy / Laryngoscopy done with the ENT specialist and the professional voice evaluation by the speech pathologist that specialize in professional voice therapy, and then the patient will be given vocal cords physiotherapy and a full 12-weeks technique for improving his breath support and tone control. While this procedure is extremely good for beginners or natural singers and actors, cantors, preachers, rock singers and rappers. It must be understood that these patients use their voice for their living their voice is their profession! Most of them simply cannot wait 12 weeks of correction like that because they will lose their jobs / places in their scheduled performances And what about the veteran singer or actor who had done a great deal of vocal training already with his voice coach and knows all about how to breath correctly? That is why this Appoggio technique will be most beneficial in these cases! Simply put, when you use Appoggio you first take in lots of air using upper chest muscles then you push in your belly muscles the diaphragm will move up pressing on the air in your lungs (that is abdominal breath support !) then you will start voice production while the pressed air is coming from below the vocal cords supporting them while vibrating, then you will use your upper chest muscles dropping them slowly controlling high pitch sounds or extra long periods of vocal singing with extra air support from the chest. So, basically, Appoggio is leaning on two breath support techniques put together the abdominal and the upper chest. A veteran singer or actor could learn that pretty quick while the beginner will be able to learn it combined with the full scale technique on the 3rd treatment providing him enough air support to hold onto his scheduled performances and thus proceeding with his 12-week voice therapy. It is good practice for the voice speech pathologist to teach the patient how to project his voice thus improving volume without putting more effort on the vocal mechanism.
  2. www.vocalizing.com By Karen Oleson and Timothy Strong The genesis for this article comes from a workshop I was asked to present for a local chapter of NATS (National Assoc. of Teachers of Singing). It is only in very recent history, that performance studies in vocal jazz have been offered in academic settings. Prior to this if one wished to be a jazz singer they learned by listening to, following and copying other singers and experimenting and performing at every opportunity. Now that jazz styles have been codified it is easier for modern educators to expose jazz singing to students at almost any age. It can be confusing for both student and teacher to try to translate the voice building techniques and exercises needed to produce desired results for both classical and jazz singing. The vocal choices one makes for singing jazz are quite different from a classical singer. My students love singing jazz and are thrilled when they are accepted into their jazz choir or ensemble but are challenged to bridge the differences between techniques. So what are these differences? Can we bridge these diverse techniques? Can they be compatible? Have we been allowing style differences to interrupt the goal of voice building? The following chart suggests some of the presumed differences in vocal technique and style. Classical Technique Voice Quality: Resonant, full bodied, clear. Breath Management: Fundamental building block for voice development. Opera singers need to sing for hours over symphony orchestra with no mic(rophone). Articulation: Pure vowels, clipped consonants, years of study in at least four languages Range: Wide range, 2 1/2 to three octaves, top notes of prime importance no matter what voice type. Flexibility: Desirable for keeping voice fresh and healthy. Necessary to negotiate challenging cadenzas. Registers: Blended, seamless connection between registers Posture: Very important consideration for breath management and voice projection. Dynamics: Requires large dynamic range from pp to ff. Messa di voce important study for voice building. Vibrato: Used extensively, integral part of the vocal quality. Jazz Technique Voice Quality: Can be earthy or breathy. Close to speaking voice. Breath Management: Singers also required to sustain long phrases and scat. But since the sound doesn’t need to as resonant, or as powerful, learning nuances of mic technique becomes essential. Articulation: Very close to speaking voice. Diphthongs are used according to singers’ choice. Range: Ranges of more than an octave unnecessary but often desired. Vocal improv takes the singer to the extremes of the voice both low and high. Flexibility: Desirable for improvisation. Registers: Breaks in voice often dramatically emphasized. Posture: Appearance often cool, dispassionate Dynamics: Fewer vocal extremes required. Vibrato: Often used minimally and at end of phrases. Classical Style Pitch: Often taught to come in on top of pitch, but to sing in middle of pitch. Rhythm: Precision is important. Runs done as meteronomically accurate as possible. Rubato done at specific places in music and according to era of music and composer. Attack: The onset of the pitch is executed gently. Letting the breath lead. The pitch needs to be precisely in tune. Musical Accuracy: Do not deviate from composers apparent intent. Sing rhythm and pitches according to what is written in the score. Improvisation: Improvisation is dictated according to current trends. Improv is allowed only in certain styles and periods of music Other features: Acting and presentation skills are important in classical singing. The quality of the sound, communicating the text and music are prime considerations. Jazz Style Pitch: Sing on lower part of pitch. Enter or scoop from under pitch. Rhythm: Fluidity within the meter is allowed and desired. Sing against or after the beat. The pause is strictly kept by the drummer so that the rest of the group can play with the rhythm. Attack: Sometimes hard onset in used, other times soft. Enter from below pitch, strong blues influence. Musical Accuracy: The whole point of singing jazz is to be a co-creator with the composer in that particular moment in time. Next time it will be different (hopefully). Improvisation: Scat syllables and improvisations are influenced by current trends. Improv is the name of the game. Other features: Presentation is secondary to listening and responding to other participants while performing. Everything is new, so that cultivating awareness of what's going on around you is of primary importance. Being in the musical moment. The chart shows how singers make choices about how they use their voices depending on the style of music. So how does this affect their training? How do we bridge these diverse techniques and can they be compatible in voice building? Most music educators will agree that we want our students to sing well, no matter what the style. Breath management is an essential part of voice building and good singing. However, because classical singers sing without a mic and have to maintain a fuller resonance they are unable to play with the subtle vocal nuances that the jazz singers enjoy. The microphone assists the jazz singer in singing with a breathy tone, growling, and singing very lightly if they wish. Still, all of those choices need breath management. Articulation is an important ingredient for both types of singing. The jazz singer can be more speech-like and casual in their approach. Ex. My = ma-i. They can play with diphthongs according to their will. Classical singers are more formal in their use of language most often stay longer on the first half vowel of a diphthong. Ex. My=mah-i. It might seem that clarity of text and understandability should have priority but both classical and jazz singers may sacrifice this for a certain type of vocal sound. Classical singers spend years learning to blend the natural occurring register breaks in the voice. Although somewhat important in the jazz singer, it is minimal. The mic can assist the jazz singer with this so that they are able to play with subtle qualities and ranges that wouldn't be heard if a classical singer tried it. Today when students enter my private studio, I ask them about their musical goals. As they are exposed to voice building techniques their goals may change but the important thing for us is to help them find their way efficiently. I've experienced having younger students wanting to be country singers develop into prize winning classical singers. I've also encountered classical trained singers who were relieved to find that there are other techniques that would help them sing musical theatre or jazz. If they are interested in both aspects of singing, the lesson time needs to be subtly managed to address different musical goals. They will need to educate their ear about pitch, vibrato, and the volume of sound and resonance of the voice. A classical singer needs to hear their voice in a natural acoustical environment without artificial support. Jazz singers needs to become accustomed to hearing themselves through amplification. As pointed out in the chart, the use of vibrato, dynamics, pitch onset, voice coloring, rhythm, and many other aspects of these two diverse styles are for the most part at odds with one another. When these considerations are pointed out to the students, they have a better chance of making appropriate choices without confusion and with an appreciation of the differences. Our studio has developed publications that present voice building exercises encompassing various musical styles.* In the example presented below, the purpose of the exercise is rich and deep: ear training, pitch accuracy, flexibility, and singing in contrasting styles. In my opinion, you get the best of both worlds here - a classical warm-up, learning to sing in a major and then a minor key (great ear training), and then scat improv in both major and minor keys. With this exercise, you have an opportunity to show off your classical voice and quickly switch to jazz. These contrasting styles require different ways of using your voice. The classical style requires a more fully resonant sound including vibrato, whereas in jazz vocals, a more speech like quality is appreciated. In conclusion, clear and meaningful communication as to the differences in vocal usage and styles can make all the difference in your students’ abilities to enjoy and perform different styles of music. I have found that presenting them with practical models for bridging the gap can do wonders for their understanding and enjoyment of music making.
  3. How do you find ways to encourage instrumentalists to feel comfortable answering questions related to singing? Examples like: How to chose repertoire for a beginning singer or what kind of vocal inefficiency is there? (Assuming they do not have much experience singing themselves) I have found that it is hard for me to get them to join the conversation during lessons in our pedagogy class. I don't want them to feel like I am calling them out, but I also really want more participation from them in general. What do you all suggest I do?
  4. https://clyp.it/user/5ohhxngx Please give me some feedback on my voice, and on whether you think it sounds nice.
  5. I've included 2 videos. Eden turn the page is to show my struggles and little wonders is to show strengths. I cant say i know what im doing technically and that's what i need y'alls help for. If there's anyone who can help me understand what I'm doing both right and wrong itd be so helpful. Thank you all for taking the time. QuesoMcpeso
  6. Home 17.m4a I apologize in advance for how much this will hurt your ears. I know I'm pitchy (advice on improving intonation quickly would be great, but trust me when I say you don't want to hear where I started 6 months ago. I missed notes so badly they couldn't even be considered flat or sharp. I guess I still do that now but I seriously couldn't even pretend to hold a melody then), but I'm most interested in how I can improve my general tone/sound/whatever. I can't seem to find what people call chest voice, and I can't really falsetto either. It's more like a very straight, hard sound (head voice I think?). I'm stupid poor right now and have only been using youtube. I'm hoping to get at least a few vocal lessons for Christmas and then start one of lunte's programs to build on those, but I would love to hear your guy's feedback on what I could improve on. I guess what I want to change most is my awful tone singing higher notes like at the end of the voice memo. I do enjoy pop and would like to sing pop, but I'd love to sing it as correctly as possible too. Thanks in advance, you guys rock.
  7. How much body movement when singing is bad, and what are some ways to work on excessive physical movement while singing?
  8. My siren (it's getting to where I want it to be, but it is still work in progress) https://soundcloud.com/kickingtone/sah004rvp (I've deliberately allowed the harsh open tones at the high end of the scale, rather than alter the vowel.) NB It is all my own opinion, so don't let it turn into a slanging match as it has in the past. If you disagree, why not post your own siren and explain the differences. Objectives: 1. Throat, larynx, upper body and vocal tract should be completely relaxed and naturally posed. Nothing much going on there. 2. All effort is concentrated in the abs, trunk and diaphragm, regulating air flow and freeing the larynx. This should enable you to glide through the passaggio. 3. Maintain a single placement. Don't flip registration. 4. Keep effort uniform throughout. Any volume change (and it can be quite substantial) is caused by resonance shift only. 5. Sing on one vowel** but allow vocal tracts resonance shifting to cause its natural change in vowel. 6. Keep the siren slow. You should be able to hold abruptly at any point. 7. Relax. No "blasting" to force ascent at any point. 8. Control. No collapse on descent. 9. Both ascent and descent are important. 10. If you are running out of breath in the 20 seconds, your breath support is probably inefficient. ** But close the vowel to protect your vocal cords from damage if you find the vowel is too open to sing safely at higher pitches. A characteristic heady resonance may kick in at around A4 for males. It may not sound pretty. Don't worry. The exercise is taking you through the second passaggio. Don't let it become a psychological barrier.
  9. Hello, Im currently a student and i love singing alot, but i couldnt afford a vocal class and im facing this problem with my voice, and i dont know what is this or why it happen. is my voice broken??? https://soundcloud.com/nicole-chang-959104894/whats-this-weird-sound i sing with my head voice at the beginning, it starts at F3 and my head voice it very weak, then i tried changing from chest voice to head voice, it has this really weird sound. anyone can tell me why this happen? and how can i fix this? pleaseeeeeee
  10. In this Quick Answer, I talk about how to train to build consistency in your singing voice. Besides an important exercise, I also address the main questions that came up from my last videos about finding your voice and avoiding voice fatigue, bringing it all together.
  11. Hi all. I think I’ve posted this in the right place. I have a question about Bruce Dickinson’s modern day vocal technique. In these clips below (at about the 2:05 and 1:52 mark) do you think that Bruce is singing in head voice or chest voice? Im asking because in the original recording and early 80s live performances he sounds much more powerfull (obviously down to age) and less airy. The chorus of this is another good example of what I mean. (1:15) Im hoping that if so, I will be able to use my head voice so sing these, and with enough practice it would hopefully sound powerfull enough to still sound semi decent since I dont have the natural range that Bruce seemed to have in the 80s and 90s. Thanks, Keir.
  12. Robert Lunte & RØDE Microphones present four weeks of vocal training in Germany, Italy and France. April, 2018. For information click the links below or reach out to the people tagged in this post. See you in April! TVS Events Page http://bit.ly/TVSEvents Download The Tour Poster HERE: http://bit.ly/TVSMCTourSpring2018 14-15 APR Ansbach, Germany http://bit.ly/TVSMCAnsbachGermany 21-22 APR Pescara, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCPescaraItaly 28-29 APR Cagliari, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCCagliariItaly 1-2 MAY Nimes, France http://bit.ly/TVSMCNimesFrance If you have any questions about the event or private lessons, contact me on my personal email or here at TMV World. I look forward to helping you with your singing. You will get results, guaranteed.
  13. I made one of these last year. What are you vocal or musical goals for this year? 1. Improve breath support, because it is something that limits me. 2. For me, the next on my list is range increase. I'm at the point now where my style would benefit by more range, and I think other things are now strong enough to where I can really focus on range. 3. Be able to play 7 songs on the guitar while singing. 4. Pick back up Piano lessons 5. Produce first cover song using audio software. 6. Continue learning songs by ear.
  14. I am sure I read something on the net about this, something to do with memory mapping or something like that Is it true?
  15. Hello , This is my first publication i little bit nervous i want to know your impressions about this song and Thank you !!
  16. This is a song I've been having my more advanced students study and work through. The guy has impecable technique through most, if not all, of the song. I usually use this as a great song for practicing tuning the formant when they get tired of going through the exercises. He rides the line between light-mass head voice and full voice all the way to belting, all the while keeping great placement. As some of you know, when you're tuned well (especially in head voice), adding in chest voice muscles, dampening, twang, distortion, and just about any other sound color is much more simple. This song is an incredible example of that tuning and manipulation of the voice. It's worth studying and attempting to mimic.
  17. Hey there! I just want to show you this website that has a bunch of free vocal exercises. Ive been using them for a couple of weeks now and they are really good! here it is: http://jacobsvocalacademy.com/vocalexercises/
  18. The answer is: Dealing with something serious like that cannot be self-served. Nevertheless, one of the commercials on weight loss for men says: “If you could do it alone, you would’ve done it already.” - Harvey Brooker Indeed, but some people still think that if they knew the diagnosis and somewhat (in theory) how it could be treated, they would have attempted fixing their vocal issues by themselves… The fact is that any voice problem, by definition, is already an internal problem; and thus, has to be treated very seriously and by a qualified voice specialist. The work with a damaged voice is usually very detailed and very intense, which applies to both sides: The injured client and the voice repair specialist. Without the guidance of a highly qualified professional, it is virtually impossible for the sufferer to lift their voice and re-channel it into the different set of muscles altogether; and on top of that, put those muscles (facial and abdominals) to work in full conjunction and coordination with each other. The above formula would allow the person to release their vocal anatomy from the pressure of the sound; and thus, allow the bruised throat and the vocal cords to heal. Moreover, the person has to adapt a new way of speaking, as well as singing (where applicable). It could be very much so equivalent to the modification of a whole “blueprint” of the person in question. Let’s say that a “dancer” was dancing for quite a few years with the feet inwards instead of outwards. Nevertheless, the dancer had gotten used to it and even felt quite comfortable with it until such time that his/her ankles and knees started to give out. So now, we have to restructure the feet position in order to save the dancer’s joints; and, as a side effect, finally teach him/her how to dance complying with professional standards and how not to damage the structural components of their body. In this case, (and as well as in any other case), we will, first of all, be teaching the brain to think differently and translate that thinking into the physical body (first in the slow-motion and then on an “automatic pilot”, so to speak). This methodology has similarities with what’s called Neural linguistic Programing. The above discipline advocates that, via special skill application, it could change and “replace” the certain modality of the certain behavior in one’s brain. As you see, my reader, it sounds pretty complex. Therefore, it never ceases to amaze me when after just an introductory session, my potential client is revealing to me that he is ready to practice by himself and quite prepared to work really hard on his own…? I’m sorry to say, but I find that a little ridiculous (to put it mildly). It would be the same as if the person would meet with a brain surgeon, who (granted) would explain in reasonable details what exactly the surgical procedure would entail; and then the patient (who is in need of a brain surgery) would decide that he, somehow, would be able to perform it himself, on his own, and at home…? Sounds funny, doesn’t it? It does indeed. But I do hear it quite often and I hope that people are thinking that way only because of the financial strain and not out of complete ignorance. On top of it, some of them are going to regular vocal coaches to seek help with their injured voice. I consider the regular vocal coaches, at best, equivalent to a regular physician who knows something about (let’s say) brain surgery, but never got specialized in it. If in real sense, (God forbid) you would need brain surgery, would you want your family physician to perform it, or you would rather hire a highly qualified brain surgeon to perform it? The above is your quiz for today. Enjoy your food for thought!
  19. Teaching both contemporary and classical students, do you have any recommendations of a comprehensive sources for vocalises? Instead of a resource to teach singing, think of it more as a supplement for a teacher to pick vocalises from for the student. As boring as a book like that might be, I need something like that. And because I'm working with classical teachers and other contemporary teachers as well, the more exhaustive and general terminology, the better. They don't all follow the same pedagogy. I was originally just going to ask @Robert Lunte, but I figure a lot of you might have recommendations.
  20. 0 downloads

    Joanna Cazden, MFA, MS-CCC, is a speech pathologist specializing in voice rehabilitation and a respected advocate for holistic, multi-disciplinary voice care. Joanna offers private services in voice rehabilitation and training, workshops and master classes for voice students, and seminars for speech pathologists and vocal arts teachers. Joanna also sees voice patients by medical referral at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's outpatient Voice program. Helping to found this program in 2001, she has treated well-known pop singers, actors, broadcasters, and musical-theater artists. She was a clinical instructor for ten years at California State University, Northridge (CSUN), and has presented scholarly papers at major voice conferences in the USA UK, and Mexico. In 2004 she was named a Fellow of the California Speech and Hearing Association, an award that honors excellence in clinical service, teaching, and community service. Joanna released six solo albums between 1973 and 1997; her first album, The Greatest Illusion (1973), has been re-released internationally. In 2000 she joined Pete Seeger and other folk luminaries on "Folksongs of the Catskills," an ensemble CD later featured at the Library of Congress. She organized the first panel on Health Issues for folk performers, at the 1992 Folk Alliance Conference, and has won numersous singing and songwriting awards. Joanna studied voice with Ellalou Dimmock, Natalie Lemonick, and Jan Pederson. She holds a BA in Drama from the University of Washington, an MFA in Acting from CalArts, and an MS in Communication Disorders and Sciences from CSUN. In 2006 she was certified by Catherine Fitzmaurice as an Associate Teacher of Fitzmaurice Voicework. In addition to her expertise in voice, Joanna is an advanced practitioner of the Reiki and Theta healing systems, and a longtime student of yoga, meditation, and bodywork. These tools are integrated into her voice and speech services according to the individual's interest and needs. Joanna Cazden www.VoiceofYourLife.com

    Free

  21. 0 downloads

    With a teaching career that spans nearly four decades, Jeannie Deva is an international celebrity voice and performance coach, published author, clinician, recording studio vocal producer, trainer of voice teachers and originator of The Deva Method® - Complete Voice Training for Stage and Studio.As a graduate from Berklee College of Music in 1975 with a degree in Composition and Arranging, Jeannie assisted in establishing the college's voice department and later became President of Berklee's Alumni Association for ten-years. Voice teachers around the world base their teaching on Ms Deva's method from her published books and CDs. She is featured on the acclaimed video The Vocalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship by Internationally respected music educator Julie Lyonn Lieberman and distributed by Hal Leonard. Jeannie Deva www.JeannieDeva.com

    Free

  22. 6 downloads

    Robert Lunte is the owner founder of the The Vocalist Studio International www.TheVocalistStudio.com, an Internationally recognized voice training school for extreme singing vocal techniques and advanced vocal instruction. Robert is also the author and producer of the critically acclaimed vocal instruction training system, “The Four Pillars of Singing”. TVS techniques are shared around the world by voice teachers as part of the TVS International Certified Instructor Program, which is one of the fastest growing vocal organizations of highly trained voice coaches in the world today. Robert is also the founder of The Modern Vocalist World www.TheModernVocalistWorld.com, the #1 online resource for vocal education and networking on the internet. This download include four separate interviews of Robert Lunte. www.TheFourPillarsofSinging.com

    Free

  23. Muffinhead suggested this poll in response to the Vocal Coach Poll I did earlier. I liked the idea, had the day off and through this together. The aim of this poll is to give a chance for more advanced singers to encourage beginning students of singing, and convey a vision for the dedication it takes to get the singing voice you desire. Hopefully no self proclaimed "singing sensations" who are actually beginners, will vote and hack the results. We got nobody hangin' out in TMVW like that though right?! no worries. The idea is, if you have dedicated yourself to training (with a coach & on your own) your singing voice for many long hours, and truly have had your talent confirmed by cheering crowds, and many genuine compliments, vote.
  24. I just watched this video, which is in TFPOS, and thought I would share it with you guys. It really makes me want to prove others wrong.