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Found 45 results

  1. What caught my attention here was the statement that modern day tenors tend to emphasize the SIXTH as the dominant harmonic. I recall an argument in which someone was trying to convince me that asymmetric vocal fold closure (due to high closed quotient) was critical for full projection, and that that is why the THIRD and FIFTH harmonic are dominant. Well, that is not consistent with what we have here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzGITC_PRWw (I am aware that Livigni has done a video on the "importance of" the closed quotient, but I still think that the science behind it is shaky.)
  2. Hi. I am really bored being Baritone. I am not sure i'm a Baritone or Not. But i have totally un-trained voice and i have also, fry voice problem by Acidic reflux. I have damaged vocal cords but still i can sing. I don't know i have to chance to become Lyric tenor? Or i am a tenor or baritone? When my voice health before, my vocal range: Full chest: E2 (Very weak and force low note) up to A4-B4 and with force alot C5 Mixed chest: I don't know this technique so i don't know. Falsetto: Max note G5 i only know (But screaming) (And my falsetto is airy and dramatic sounds like very Mickey mouse tone) Head voice: Very weak but max note C5 probably. Here is my some cover tests: This recording when my voice is health... (Old a little bit)
  3. Years ago this WAS the best forum for singers and teachers. Those wishing to learn and those willing to help and those who just want to discuss their thoughts on singing and training.. There is still a need for this forum and a community to belong to and interact with. I was here when the community was thriving and when things declined. There are two main issues that singers have to deal with. Egos and rejection. The thoughts of "Am I good enough?" and "Who has the right to tell me I am not good enough". No one has the right to tell you that you are not good enough. But, everyone does have a right to their opinion, and opinions differ. Some people will have a more pleasant starting sound than other people(according to "Popular" opinion) and people have different issues vocally to deal with. Not to mention the different purposes for wanting to improve and the different applications. So, when you ask "Am I good enough?" You will get opinions that you may not like and you may get opinions that would make you believe there is no improvement needed. The FACT is that your voice is constantly changing and keeping up with the changes and making improvements takes work and practice. Any state that your voice is in right now can and will change with time and the way you choose to develope. The problem arose with people arguing opinions as facts. Just because you like or dislike something or believe something does not make it a fact or correct. Letting other people express their opinion without challenging it will give yourself different ways to deal with issues that you may have with your own development. To that extent and also, Giving advice and expressing your own opinion will give you insights on how you yourself feel about your development and other ways and things you can do to improve your own vocal skills. Back to the topic of this post: Do you want to continue with this forum and give and receive advice and engage in conversations about vocal improvement, heath and how things work for vocalists and why they work or do not? YOU, who or whom ever you are, need to take part for this forum to continue and grow and be great again.
  4. Hey guys. So I've been singing for some years now. I'm classicaly trained, theoretically a tenor, but I could never manage to understand and make the adjustments to go higher than F4 without breaking into M2 or straining a lot. Last year I started reading a lot about voice physiology and learning contemporary singing technique. Now I can go sometimes even up to G5 (not a pretty singable tone yet, but it's there). From Bb4 up I can somehow manage a lighter sound that doesn't sound like M2, but between E4 and A4 I can only do full-on belting or something lighter but with a lot of constriction (arytenoids I guess). I'm trying to achieve a lighter and freer M1 (mixed?) sound in that range, and so I've been reading and watching many YouTube videos on that, but I'm very confused with the way scientists and vocal coaches differently name the registers and stuff, so it's being hard to clearly understand what they mean and choose a way to approach the matter. I have to say that I personally think the names Chest, Head and Mixed Voice are terrible and extremely misleading, and they did nothing but prevent me from moving forward. Understanding the vibratory mechanisms and the filter/resonance adjustments is what really is helping me evolve. And although I understand a lot of people don't benefit from scientific explanations, it's really works for me. From what I understand, SCIENTIFICALLY mixed voice can be either: 1. M1 with less vocalis contraction and more nasal airflow/rhinopharyngeal resonance, as used by man and women in contemporary music and by men in high notes in classical. 2. M2 with more rhinopharyngeal resonance and twang in the higher range in contemporary singing. 3. M2 with more rhinopharyngeal resonance in the female first passaggio in classical. And head voice can refer to: 1. any sound in M2 2. only M2 with cartilaginous adduction Now I'm really confused with how vocal coaches use the terms. For me, the sound of what many demonstrate as Head voice - specially those who don't count falsetto as Head voice - is not M2 at all, but rather my first description of Mixed voice (less compressed M1 with rhinopharyngeal resonance). Which makes me think, when they say head voice they are referring mainly to head resonance (rhinopharynx) and not to the vibratory mechanism M2. So although many exercises for bridging/mixing/blending DO go from M1 to M2, and this is of course also used in actual singing, the "bridging" that happens most of the time in the mid-high range is simply the adjustments to go from M1 with oral resonance to M1 with nasal resonance, to allow the laryngeal tilt, less compression and lower subglottal pressure without breaking into M2. I'm still beginning in the science stuff, does anyone with more knowledge in that area agrees, disagrees or have any other thoughts on the subject and on how I could approach a softer sound between E4 and A4?
  5. Hello I am having real trouble finding my falsetto, I can't make that effortless sound, it is always strained. I was always able to make a voice that I thought was falsetto, but I got to the conclusion that is flageolet instead. I got really used to it and it is relaxed, and really sounds like falsetto, but I think it isn't falsetto mainly because: - It isn't connected to chest voice. I know sometimes it's difficult to connect head and chest voice, but this is extremely disconnected, it is a different world. - I am able to transition smoothly from whistle to this flageolet. Not trying hard at all, just lowering the pitch from whistle, I end up in this voice. Demo: https://instaud.io/3rzk So, an example of this strained 'falsetto', in a moment with the voice quite tired (so that the strain is noticeable): https://instaud.io/3rzm Same song, in flageolet (I know it sounds a lot like a falsetto):https://instaud.io/3rzd An example of a song, in falsetto, that sounded better, in a moment my voice wasn't that tired: https://instaud.io/3rzf (Yes, I like Ed Sheeran XD). This is as close to a relaxed falsetto that I can get. So, any advice on how to find that relaxed falsetto? Maybe I am still unable to do it because I have those muscles untrained? I've tried yawning, making the sound of an owl, or Mickey Mouse's voice... Everything is strained. Any advice, or exercise? Thank you in advance Whistle to flageolet.mp3 Strained falsetto.mp3 Flageolet.mp3
  6. Hey Guys i'm new on this forum, I would really appreciate your opinion about my High C bandicam 2019-02-25 18-45-28-988.mp4
  7. WhatsUp Guys, I want to know what is it that really actually happening to the singing voice and the high notes when singing publicly & spontaneously I feel like These days we live in a Technology world that is near taking over our social life as human beings lol so i just thought we should be more social to each other. And an idea came up in my head, why not Practicing my vocals in a such enviroment! Remember this is just a part of my Training Routine, so i'm glad if you give me alot of feedback! Mash up with all the feedbacks you can get! Peace!
  8. Hi, I have always, as long as I have defined my self as a singer, experienced periods of bad vocal health. Over time I have learned better technique and learned to sing smart and kind of use damage control paths through songs on rough days but I find it really hard to just surrender to not knowing what really goes on. Problem is basically this. During periods which can last from a few days to a few months in row, I experience like some configuration just goes out after just a very short time singing notes over the passagio. What happens after this is that my falsetto/neutral is fine while my twang is totally gone and trying to produce twanged vowels result in a complete mess. I can still sing cross the passagio with heavy voice production in a kind of overdriven manner but the smooth transition is gone. Funny though how the configuration seem to work somewhat initially only to go out completely after a short while. The common answer to vocal problems like this might be acid reflix. Go see a doctor, get your subscriptions and eliminate triggers. Yes, my doctor has seen symptoms of acid reflux and I have been on and off prescription medicines for a long time. I rather not take them though considering negative sideffects from such meds. Also the meds doesn't really seem to do the trick or might work initially like some kind of pseudo effect. But the problems always seem to come back. I also remember doing laryngoscopy one time during a period of experiencing problems and the doctor could not find any obvious redness. That thew me a little bit of the chair thinking it might have to do with something else. I seldom experience severe "morning voice" which seem to be a common symptom of LPR or GERD. The problem only occurs when singing over the passagio and during long vocal lines. I am interested in what other things could cause the symptoms i'm describing. A theory of mine is that it is related to viral infection. I base this theory upon the fact that problems seem to go when after periods of being sick. My theory is that there could be viral infections that does not break out and just sits there waiting for the body defense system to react. Another theory is that this is technique related and could be the result of a vocal blow out or something like that. Allhough I never change my technique and when I have a good day everything is fine and this could sometimes be from one day to the next so it really does not make sense. I wonder what you think. Have anyone of you had or maybe are having the same kind of problems?
  9. I've gotten really good at pulling chest but I think for long term success I'll need to find a neutral position to sing in and eliminate strain. So my question for you guys is how do you make sure you can put in the right amount of effort to keep the breath flowing and not have the throat clinch up. What I've been doing to practice this is not pushing myself at all just trying to breathe and remain neutral and let the tone and the notes come, if they don't come I either go falsetto or change the note of the song I'm singing. I still feel like strain and reliance on the throat can creep in though maybe not enough to cause hoarseness but probably enough that it's not allowing the breath to support the cords and limiting my voice to one certain timbre and volume. I think having a breathy tone is a better starting point than having a solid tone because at least then you know the breath is flowing and from there you can work into a solid tone to keep stamina reserved. Just a little discussion on the topic of strain and remaining neutral I feel will be good.
  10. This is by far the best exercise I've taught to help students overcome choking. I've had my share of students who deal with Muscle Tension Dysphonia. This is when they not only choke off on higher notes, they may not have higher notes at all (including head voice or access to their upper chest range), and often it's present in their speaking voice too. I often recommend first and foremost that they see an ENT to make sure there's no medical issues holding them back. Then, after working through many singing exercises meant to open up the throat and relax the glottis, I recommend a speech therapist. Sometimes I work with them for months with only a little progress before sending them to a therapist. I've had one student over a year who has had multiple singing exercises work for him one day, and totally fail on the next day, maybe even 10-minutes later. He's made progress, but it's extremely slow. He couldn't sing head voice at all when he came to me, and even his upper chest range choked off horribly. He hasn't had much success finding a speech therapist who will respond to him. And since I have quite a few students who deal with something similar, and really want to see him progress, I set out to find the answers for him. Besides using the cocktail straw exercise from Ingo Titze (which I put in part 2 of my warmup video), appoggio crescendos that morph into a horizontal embouchure, as well as onsets like dampening, wind, and pulse, the video below is BY FAR the best exercise I've found for getting my students to feel what opening the throat and finding deeper soft palate placement feels like. Now I just need to make my own video of everything I do from there.
  11. Hello everybody! So my last thread I asked for help on mixed/ middle register. I have been working on it for a little while now but I still feel like I'm shouting and using too much air on belting high notes. It's as if I'm trying to sing it rather than just letting the sound out. Here is a comparison: and me lol: Any tips or advice is appreciated. Don't know if I'm shouting because I can't get that cord closure properly in my higher registers or if it's a bunch of different things. Woke up a little hoarse today too after singing for around 2-3 hours heavily. this is so annoying Thank you ! Love this forum for all the help I get
  12. Hello singers! I have scoured the internet for any info or exercises to develop a faster vibrato. Most posts and articles discourage what I am going for. Some of my favorite vocalists have a very fast vibrato, or tremolo, like Maynard from Tool, among others. Mine is already at or sometimes a little slower than 6 Hz, which I know is recommended, but not the sound I want. If anyone has any advice or hopefully at least one exercise that will specifically target and develop the muscles needed to gain a faster vibrato I would be so appreciative! -p0
  13. I had mentioned this singer "Chris Stapleton" in another thread. Thought I'd share this video/song he recently published. I was really struck by the numerous examples of solid vocal athleticism that arise in this performance. I try not to overanalyze every good vocal too often, cuz sometimes I loose the "soul" of the song in my ear from all of the deconstruction I use to understand the vocal. Couldn't resist on this one. Still "hearing the soul" to date. I've tagged all the key words that I believe I recognize "done well" in this composition. Personally, I'm most impressed with his mastery over what I would assume are the critical configurations which bring great resonance with comparatively low level respiration. I'm convinced that, with the best possible formant, combined with the strength support of skilled appoggio, the "illusion" of a belt is created. He is singing at a relatively low volume yet, the intensity of his voice is sustained. The same nuance is applied to his vocal distortion, which he employs mostly in the higher notes. Those are my impressions.
  14. I'm curious if I am doing this right... I'm not even sure how to explain it. Here is a guy teaching it .. it's in korean but he's basically saying try to "pull" the sound out from the chest instead of having the sound fly out through ur mouth. Can someone explain to me in what way is this taught normally? Is this just the feel of "open throat?" or "support"? AND if this is how it should feel then how do I get that "mask" placement without losing that DEEP breath support? This way helped me develop my mix but I'm curious if this method is correct and is just another way of teaching the same thing? example done by a professional performance. (The sound literally sounds like a really low soft mix voice in the intro and when belting it sounds like the vibrato is so free and resonating really low. Is this how proper singing should be done? I am just wondering on how I should properly train and do warmups/workouts..
  15. I recently discovered the importance of cord closure in singing. It made singing so much easier and accessing the mixed voice feels just so natural and good now. But, it kind of changed my view on breathing in singing. I don't understand if I should just focus on cord closure or actively focus on keeping the breath in the body with abdominal, back and intercostal muscles. Before I worked on cord closure so much, I would focus on what was happening with my torso muscles, but when I started developing good cord closure it all came naturally. My muscles would engage as they were supposed to do and I would feel it and I didn't worry about it. But sometimes, for example when I'm nervous, actively holding the breath with those muscles combined with focusing on good closure seems easier. Then again, at times I feel like I'm holding the breath a bit more than necessary - it doesn't hurt my singing, but I feel good closure could be achieved with less engagement. The question is: should I actively focus on holding the breath in the body with my torso muscles or is focusing on good closure enough?
  16. Hello guys! I am just curious about this singer's voice and volume when he sings. I notice it is very airy and I know singing with excessive air is bad for your chords, but is there something about his technique or voice that allowed him to sing so long with a healthy voice? (10+ years) I also get very confused on how loud to sing when singing such songs. I guess it is a common problem in a sense when I sing very softly, I can reach those notes easily with my head voice with very little chord closure. OR I end up singing so loud where its basically belting with full chord closure. I can't for the life of me hit that middle area where there is JUST enough power while maintaining such a sweet tone without POWERING IT OUT. ( I am referring to the chorus) Any ideas? Thank you!
  17. Too often, when I get in front of a microphone with loud speakers (including the monitor) I end up shouting. Then, even if I try to grasp the correct compression, I feel like it's too late. I've lost it for the night. I practice a comfortable amount of compression when I'm at home and as a result sound much better than any of my performances. Any tips on resetting or getting a grip on compression when it starts slipping away? Or is this something that I simply have to grasp from the very beginning of a show?
  18. Does professional and the vibrant and pleasant vocal tones develop over a long time? I am not currently satisfied with my range and tone especially and I want to be able to develop more and more. How is he able to manipulate his tone so well comparing the first two videos and third video? It's almost as if he's two different singers.. Personal questions: I have been singing for a while now but only recently throughout 2016 I have "Properly practiced" getting rid of my bad habits, fixing tone, pitch, etc. 1. Is it normal that after I started to do so, my range increased VERY FAST. In a span of 4-6 months, I am able now to reach the notes he is singing that otherwise BEFORE I would just choke and sound like I am shouting. Just curious because I am worried I might be destroying my voice by pushing it too hard. There are times before I damaged my voice by improper technique which I guess somehow made my voice range increase as a short cut? is that even possible? I tend to just go all out when I sing right after doing my workouts. Example song I practice is the first video I post below.. ( I am currently using Ken Tamplin's workouts, if that is helpful in any way). ONE IMPORTANT thing to note is that as I go up in pitch and shed my weight, It feels like the TONE of my voice gets higher as well. It's like I sound chesty in the lower ranges then suddenly like little kid in the higher ranges. I also tend to MIMIC singers for a long time... sadly.. is it normal that I am mimicing their style in every different singer? I feel like it doesn't sound "right" if I don't sing with their TONE. 2. As I go higher in pitch, is it normal to feel like something in my mask/palate area to NARROW DOWN? It feels like my mask area is flexing and my chords are very tightly closing. IT ISN'T PAINFUL. Or is this improper technique? Am I suppose to feel COMPLETELY OPEN? When I try to keep it completely open it feels like my voice goes SPLAT and airy and it hurts. Sometimes I feel like I am overwhelmed wondering if I am singing right or am I singing improperly even following his lessons and achieving growth. Anyways heres, the singer. How is his technique? It'll be awesome if there are some veterans or experienced singers to guide a newbie like myself to achieve this versatility in terms of programs and what I need to do. How does everyone here see Ken Tamplin's program?... Thank you!!
  19. Lately I've been able to drag my voice across vocal breaks, or what feels like a vocal break, to either increase efficiency of breath and eliminate strain or drop or raise the timbre while maintaining the note. It takes a little energy but feels similar to what making a cackling sound would feel like or a slight vocal fry. It happens purposely with effort and happens in a second or less. It doesn't hurt and it feels good especially because the flow once I drag my voice through the break is greatly increased or balanced. Does this sound like engaging glottal bleed or conversely engaging sub glottal pressure? I never run out of breath singing anymore but also I don't take strained breaths they're almost too easy in a way. At the same time I can sing normally without strain without taking a breath after an exhale. A month ago I experienced a slight pain, which is sort of an overstatement, or tightness in my throat while singing. Through attention and effort I was able to subdue that feeling. Now the only time I experience any sensation outside of what I would consider normal would be when I push my voice too far with what I guess is too much compression. After I experience an unwelcome vocal sensation I mentally take note of it and try to either increase sub glottal pressure or decrease compression when retrying that coordination. Which is how I think it should be rather than be afraid of vocal strain or throat pain you should be mindful of it and recognize it as a possibility. One that can be overcome with vigilance, caution, balanced effort and commitment.
  20. This is something I did a few months back that I wanted to share, it's when I first starting feeling kinda comfortable around the C5-D5 area in full voice. Any and all feedback welcome. https://app.box.com/s/zt2zay06qbl8orzn9y9fwvcozqlz41bv
  21. Great song that has been on my to-do list for a while, hope you like it, let me know how it sounds if you can. https://app.box.com/s/63y1ea0bnv3gtxrlicvdbyitu2u56pua Thanks in advance!! Felipe
  22. Hi, I have recently started practicing vocalizing a simple "EE" vowel and trying to hold that note, and I notice that it realy helps with cord closure. For example, I'll start the note on "EE" and be breathy for just a short while.. keep the air going.. and at some point it feels thats the cords come close together and a clean tone is produced, and after that I can hold the note with the clean tone in it. I am very curious to know what is the explanation behind this vowel and how does it work? Thanks!
  23. Hello everybody ! Here a quick cover of "man in the mirror" of MJ , recorded with ipad . I wanted to have some review of what you think of my version , and some advices to improve my singing and sing it better. I am high barry but not tenor so the song is played 3 half step down, the original pitch is too high for me .
  24. This is just a quick recording, Using what I call "Fake" voice. I am playing with a little rasp. While growing up and singing with relatives they would condemn me for NOT using "MY NATURAL" voice. So I got stuck thinking to "Fake it" was a wrong thing to do. I think that some of this is on the right path to "Singing" rather than what I was doing before and thinking that I was "Singing" using my "Natural" voice. So if you would .......... Point out what is "Right" rather than just saying it sucks and I need more lessons. Thanks.
  25. Hello. I'm not a singer but I thought it would be the best place to seek advice. I've been having issues for a while about my voice. It leaks a lot of breath or air. My voice is quiet, lacks clarity. If I go to loud places I struggle to be heard. I lose my voice if I have to try speak loud or push for more volume. I'm far too quiet no matter what I do. The more I push for volume the breather my voice gets then my throat feels scratchy. If I done a lot of speaking and shouting on A night out my vocal cords are swollen, but weirdly it seems clearer and deeper, like the swollen cords cover up the air leak or something. Ive tried loads of exercises to improve chord closure but I can't seem to improve the quality of my voice. Can someone help me or offer me any advice? Ive also had my vocal cords checked with a scope. Which I was told is healthy... thanks