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Found 48 results

  1. In a world full of manufacturers who offer various dynamic microphone models, a handful of proven classics rule the market. Many will agree that the design of this type of instrument has been pretty much perfected and completed over the years, so is it worth paying attention to similar products that still pop up from time to time? We chose one recent entry that has made quite a big name for itself, the JZ Microphones’ HH1, and tested it to see whether it really is an improvement of age-old microphone technology. The HH1 is a handheld dynamic microphone made by a European company called JZ Microphones. It’s their first product to feature a dynamic capsule. They claim it is “developed in best traditions of JZ Microphones” and provides users with “extended frequency range to suit most vocal and instrumental needs.” Neodymium magnet equipped cardioid capsule is housed in a handcrafted metal body with a special shock-mounting technology. It comes with a rather elegant pouch and a microphone clamp. Lighter and brighter That’s the thing with JZ Microphones: it seems that everything they make has some unique visual twist. As you can see, the same goes for the HH1. One has to admit that the microphone looks awesome: matte black coloring, a fancy logo, and diamond-shaped flat-fronted grille. It is the size of a typical dynamic (58 x 172 mm), has an XLR-3 connector, and an extended frequency response (50 Hz – 18 kHz). Weighing 280 grams (9.8oz), it is a bit lighter than the SM58. The frequency graph that comes along with the microphone shows a noticeable peak at 5 kHz and shelving-down right before 200Hz, meaning that it’s lighter and brighter than most standard dynamics. The simple geniality of a flat grille JZ Microphones says that the HH1 is a perfect fit for vocals, drums, and guitar amps. We tested it in various scenarios for all three applications. We started by trying it on both male and female vocals, and were impressed instantly. It turns out this mic needs little to no EQ. Gone were our fears that the HH1 would have a cheap brightness you get from low-quality mics. Instead, it had great clarity on male as well as female vocals. The HH1’s flat grille has to be mentioned here as well. It keeps the sound source on-axis while avoiding tone and level variations. It was the same story when it came to the acoustic guitar, which produced just the right amount of brightness even at close distances. The flat grille also made for easy, spot-on guitar amp miking (obviously). It was a good fit for a snare drum as well, providing much-needed definition. Among all the pros, the only con I could think of would be a mild self-noise (the HH1 has a pretty strong output). To be frank, it is not even close to being a real problem (at least for us, in our setting it wasn’t) but it is a bit more noticeable than that of other classics. HH1 – a dynamic with distinct studio mic pedigree In conclusion, the HH1 easily fits among the best sounding industry standard dynamic mics. It has its own sound but isn’t a black sheep or avant-garde in any way, and if the market for dynamic microphones wasn’t so oversaturated, this little piece of technology would make the competition worried. It is hard to be completely blown away by yet another dynamic because there are so many to choose from. However, there’s no denying that with the HH1, JZ Microphones has managed to raise the bar for sound and design. It is very apparent that this dynamic mic was made by people who mainly specialize in high-quality studio microphones. It is elegant yet very well built and should withstand the punishment of live performances. If you’re ready to try something new, don’t hesitate and get one of these. This can be an excellent choice for rehearsal studios, live performances, demo making, and bedroom studio projects. Find out more about JZ Microphones products.
  2. Nicole Chang

    What sound is this?!

    Hello, Im currently a student and i love singing alot, but i couldnt afford a vocal class and im facing this problem with my voice, and i dont know what is this or why it happen. is my voice broken??? https://soundcloud.com/nicole-chang-959104894/whats-this-weird-sound i sing with my head voice at the beginning, it starts at F3 and my head voice it very weak, then i tried changing from chest voice to head voice, it has this really weird sound. anyone can tell me why this happen? and how can i fix this? pleaseeeeeee
  3. European company JZ Microphones is amongst many manufacturers that offer a modern take on vintage sound. Their Vintage 11 (V11) is said to produce very smooth sounding top end, and in theory, should be very good for voice-over work. But the concept of “modern vintage” still sounds a bit vague and lacking explanation to some. Needless to say, we got our hands on one of these mics to see what it does. When it comes to striking visual design characteristic of JZ Microphones, the V11 is no exception. This thing looks like it belongs in the interior of an expensive luxury car, perhaps as an ashtray or a compartment for your diamond encrusted smartphone. A modern take on a vintage sound The V11 is a high-performance cardioid condenser microphone with a one-inch gold sputtered capsule (JZ Microphones patented GDC capsule making technology). JZ Microphones claims that while the microphone is quite versatile it works best on acoustic guitar, vocals, and wind instruments. The frequency graph of V11 shows a noticeable bump in the lower end and suggests it is designed to deliver smooth, rich, and warm sounds. The V11 has a large diaphragm 27 mm (1,06") capsule, extra low self-noise level (6,5 dB (A)) maximum sound pressure level (SPL) of 134,5 dB, class-A discrete electronics, and gold-plated output contacts. It comes with an external specially designed shock-mount and, just like all other mics that JZ Microphones produces, is handcrafted. Noticeably above the similarly priced competition Opinions about microphones are subjective, but it has to be mentioned that V11 has caught the attention of award-winning producer Rafa Sardina (Lady Gaga, Beyoncé, Stevie Wonder). Sardina has repeatedly stated that he loves many JZ Microphones products and judging from the interviews, the V11 is one of his favorites. We tested it on both male and female singers, trying out a number of singing styles and settings.6 Other “Vintage” series mics (V47, V67) are supposedly made to bring back the sound of all time classics but with the V11 (11 stands for 2011 – the year in which the mic was launched) the company’s founder and designer Juris Zarins hoped to create a microphone that would give you a vintage vibe, but with quite a bit of modern mic-making tradition present in design and during production. The sound, however, shows why JZ Microphones is confident enough to call it the “next classic” on more than one occasion. It proved to be a true gem when it came to spoken word performances. This microphone doesn’t look the part, but it is indeed an excellent tool for radio and performs exceptionally well as a voiceover microphone. Minimal to no EQ intervention is needed, in my opinion. When it comes to singing, it is quite warm yet does not lose clarity. Also, if the bass lift is not welcome at all, you can deal with it easily. The built-in shock-mount is very simple, easy to use, and actually works. The V11’s price tag makes it fair to compare it to all other work-horses that are used for spoken word and broadcasting, and the V11 stands out with a more refined, classy sound. You can just feel that it wasn’t designed as a budget microphone meant to overwhelm the market. They’ve obviously put serious thought into it. I can’t find any problems with construction or sound. I’m going to guess that the reason for this is that the company mainly produces expensive “premium” class microphones and hasn’t really optimized the V11’s production to fit the mid-range price tag. I am pretty sure that most if not all of the high-grade components they use for their most expensive mics are in the V11 as well. After all, are there many other mid-priced microphones that have impressed the likes of Rafa Sardina? In conclusion All in all, what strikes me is the big picture. From what’s written in brochures, the big claims and peculiar marketing strategy might make some buyers confused. I’m still not sure why the whole “modern yet vintage” concept was chosen. In reality, it is simply a very good, very well built, warm-sounding studio microphone with an attractive price tag (and from what I can see, they have generous discounts very often). Someone who is operating on a budget looking for that hi-end studio sound should consider the V11. Accomplished pros have no reason to shy away from it, too. Granted, it is not made to compete with and function like more expensive studio classics, but it is so much more (I can’t stress this enough) than the price tag suggests. Find out more about JZ Microphones products.
  4. For about ten years, a European company called JZ Microphones has made its flagship Black Hole 2 (BH2) studio microphone, supposedly a versatile, visually stunning, and beautifully sounding mic that “easily finds its place among celebrated all-time classics”. It seems that up until now critics have showered this piece of technology with one favorable review after another (to the point where it almost gets a bit ridiculous), so we thought we’d give it a try and see if it really deserves such generosity. The looks JZ Microphones present their BH2 as a “premium”, “high-end” studio microphone, but I’m sure most of you will agree that it does not really look the part. First of all, there’s a hole in the middle. The microphone seems to be rather small and thin, and it doesn’t look like it will fit in a standard spider shock-mount. It leaves you with quite a few questions when you unpack it for the first time, but let’s take a look at some important facts in the brochure. The tech BH2 is a fixed cardioid, large diaphragm 1,06" (27mm) condenser microphone with one large, true electrostatic capsule inside the compact head. Qualities that make it stand out amongst the rest of the herd are JZ Microphones’ patented capsule making technology, Golden Drop Capsule (GDC). Once this technology is implemented, it gives the microphone extra low self-noise level of 7,5 dB (A), discrete class-A electronics, maximum Sound Pressure Level (SPL) of 134,5 dB, and a unique reverberation-canceling shape. It also comes with a specially designed shock-mount and is made by hand. The sound When we decided to test the BH2 we came up with quite an obstacle course: we would use it in all sorts of vocal applications with numerous singers and different types of voices. Upon playing back the very first takes, it became clear how unfair it was to judge this microphone by its looks. The recorded voice sang to us with almost no coloration yet the sound was very flattering (especially for male vocals, as it later became clear) and seemed polished. BH2 presented itself to us in a very primal way. It was like being approached by a large wild animal: you feel its presence instantly. There was no need to analyze the sound or compare it to something else. It was clear right then and there that this mic should not be disregarded. It produces very crisp, detailed voice recordings and would probably do an amazing job with rap vocals. It performs very well both close up and from a considerable distance and captures clear recordings of multiple singers at once. Sure, it gave off U87 and C414 vibes (as often mentioned in reviews), but the amazing part that there’s a very large, dominating chunk of its own personality in there. It delivers the actual sound of whatever it is you’re recording with no apparent noise and features ridiculously low, yet beautiful coloration. This microphone is made for professionals and should be used in high-class studios. To a seasoned recording engineer, it will deliver the pristine sound that is expected of such a specialist. To a singer, it will bring out the very best characteristics of your voice. To someone who is not yet ready, it will tell it to you straight and emphasize your shortcomings. There is no disputing that putting “premium”, “high-end” (or any other fancy English words that the BH2’s European engineers can think of) on to the box of this microphone is completely justified. Although the unusual shape and origins of this microphone can leave you perplexed at first, it soon becomes clear that back in 2007 when JZ Microphones created the BH2, they came up with a whole new design for technology that recently celebrated its 100th birthday. Find out more about JZ Microphones products.
  5. Hello all, I used to use a crappy USB Art M-one condenser mic but after doing much research have upgraded to a Scarlett 2i2 combined with an MXL V67G. Problem I recorded myself and to be honest, while the recording is clean and clear (at least compared to my crappy USB condenser mic), it sounds so different from when I sing in person. This recording lacks power, and it just has this really dampened feeling, and sounds so boring compared to myself singing in person (friends who I show this to agree also). I'm wondering if this can be fixed just through software like EQ-ing and compressing, reverb etc, or do I need a better mic? If I do, I would preferably like to spend below $100. Recording Info The recording I have below is just noise reduction and normalize, no compression, reverb, equalizer nothing. I have tried some basic compression & reverb on another recording and while it improves the output (have not uploaded this MP3 yet), still doesn't sound the same as in person. Am I just a newb at EQ-ing? Or is this a microphone limitation? Recording below EDIT: If this is the wrong forum, mods please move to correct one
  6. Robert Lunte & RØDE Microphones present four weeks of vocal training in Germany, Italy and France. April, 2018. For information click the links below or reach out to the people tagged in this post. See you in April! TVS Events Page http://bit.ly/TVSEvents Download The Tour Poster HERE: http://bit.ly/TVSMCTourSpring2018 14-15 APR Ansbach, Germany http://bit.ly/TVSMCAnsbachGermany 21-22 APR Pescara, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCPescaraItaly 28-29 APR Cagliari, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCCagliariItaly 1-2 MAY Nimes, France http://bit.ly/TVSMCNimesFrance If you have any questions about the event or private lessons, contact me on my personal email or here at TMV World. I look forward to helping you with your singing. You will get results, guaranteed.
  7. Looking to get some equipment to record my voice with. Any good recommendations as far as a USB mic goes? I'm looking to see if I can get a decent one for under $200. What else would be good to have equipment-wise or software-wise? I have an MIDI keyboard that I can play fairly well, and a couple guitars as well, so I may play some stuff that I would want to transfer to the computer. And as far as software goes, I can also use software that works on Windows (7 or 8) or Mac (Mavericks).
  8. Back by popular demand... The Carbonphone with limited edition dark stained Tone Box and retro knob! $425US + S/H. First come, first serve. Get in touch here: http://placidaudio.com/contact. Sound samples and additional info here: http://placidaudio.com/products/carbonphone/
  9. Robert Lunte and producer Jason Shavey mixing a new song, "The Fool That's Now Forgiven". Just a casual behind the scenes video of two guys working on a great song. This board is an SSL4000g. The microphone was an ADK U67. Enjoy! http://www.TheVocalistStudio.com http://www.SynergyNW.com
  10. The Carbonphone by Placid Audio is a very unique microphone for anyone who is interested in experimenting with sound. Its military grade carbon granule element captures sound and creates a "lofi" sound that is naturally distorted. Creating sounds similar to scratchy vinyl or an old military radio, this microphone is perfect for anyone looking to recreate a more vintage tone or anyone looking to create something new altogether. Included with the microphone is the Tone Box which provides the current which is needed to power the microphone. While the microphone can be powered by any standard 9 volt power supply, the Tone Box can also shape the sound through a variable five position filter circuit. Each selection on the control knob offers a different frequency response, allowing the Carbonphone to be used on a broad range instruments and for various applications. Because the sound of Carbonphone has a character unlike many other traditional mics, it makes a great addition to any recording enthusiast’s arsenal of microphones. It can be used as an all out obvious ‘effect’ on it’s own or it can be paired with other traditional microphones for infinite blending possibilities. The Carbonphone is a perfect microphone for any person looking to update their studio with new sounds but it is also usable for live performances and with its high durability and great resistance to high pressure sound levels. FEATURES Military grade carbon granule capsule Fully balanced output Quality Hammond output transformer Rugged copper housing and components Powered 5 position variable filter Tone Box Tone Box doubles as a phantom power source Tone Box can be used with other microphones 9 volt power supply for Tone Box High quality Nuetrik 3 pin XLR connectors Handcrafted in the U.S.A Lifetime operational warranty Adjustable aircraft aluminum mounting bracket to fit North American style stands (will fit European style stands with common threaded adapter) SPECS Type: Carbon Polar Pattern: Cardioid Frequency Response: 100Hz ­- 10kHz Impedance: 600 ohms Output: 120 +/­ 2dB SPL @ 1 kHz Mic Dimensions: 1.75 x 5.5 inches Tone Box Dimensions: 5.25 x 4.25 x 2.25 inches Mic Weight: 1 lbs. Tone Box Weight 0.70 lbs. *The Modern Vocalist World is brought to you by The Vocalist Studio, course and training for singers.
  11. Hi All, I have a Singing machine SMG-138 and the microphone which came along with it was very bad. I wanted to do some good home recordings so I did some research and went ahead and bought a Shure SM58 microphone. Now the problem is that though the microphone is good , it seems the small karaoke machine speakers cannot deliver enough amplification or power for the speaker. I really have to place the Shure mic almost inside my mouth to get some voice out of the speakers. This is very frustrating after buying a microphone praised so much by the community everywhere. Can you please suggest a speaker/ pa system for my home which will go well with the Shure SM 58 , It will be better if it is a two speaker system so that I can place it in the two corners of my living room. It should sound nice when i sing in front of my guests without me putting too much effort. I believe with the right gears singing should not not need shouting which is what currently i am doing :). Price range : 200 to 400 USD , but I am open to suggestions.
  12. MusicalGearSurvey

    Survey on musical gear

    Dear fellow musicians In online boards, we musicians extensively discuss about instruments and gear, often with quite some passion. These discussions range from the suitability of certain instrument models for specific genres to the size of one’s instrument collection. Research has not yet paid special attention to such discussions. This is quite surprising as there is a lot to be learned about musical and music-related practices, e.g. what motivates musicians to collect instruments, how do we use our gear to develop our musical identity and what criteria do we regard as important when acquiring a new instrument. As musicians (guitarists, bassists and drummers) and musicologists, we aim to explore this interesting issue with an online survey. We need as many participants as possible. Being dependent on your assistance, we kindly ask you to fill in our survey. The instruments considered are guitars, bass guitars, drums, keyboards, saxophones and trumpets. The survey should take about 20 minutes and the responses are completely anonymous. All data are used exclusively for academic (non-commercial) research in music. There is no funding involved. As musicians ourselves, we are interested to research this subject. By taking part in the study, you are supporting two academics in the early phases of their careers! We have been given permission by the moderators to post our survey in this board. If you are interested in participating, please follow this link to visit the survey: https://www.soscisurvey.de/musicalgear/?r=7 Thank you very much for your support! Best wishes from Germany, Jan and Jonas
  13. Robert Lunte

    Audix VX5 Condenser Microphone

    Robert Lunte, of The Vocalist Studio and The Four Pillars of Singing shares some details about the Audio VX5, condenser microphone. Purchase the Audix VX5 here: http://www.TheVocalGearStore.com. Description The VX5 is a multi purpose, professional vocal condenser microphone designed for live, studio and broadcast applications. With an ability to duplicate studio quality sound on stage, the VX5 has a smooth and accurate frequency response, resistance to feedback and handles very high SPLs without distortion. Designed with a tight and uniformly controlled supercardioid polar pattern, the VX5 helps isolate vocals from the rest of the stage. Other features are a 14 mm gold vapor diaphragm, an acoustically ported steel mesh grill with a multi-stage pop filter, and a -10 dB pad and bass roll-off filter. The VX5 will handle SPLs in excess of 140 dB (with pad and roll-off engaged) and will provide over 20 dB of ambient noise rejection on live stages. In addition to vocal applications, the VX5 is designed to capture instruments such as guitars, woodwinds, brasses, percussion toys, drum overheads, hi-hats and pianos. The VX5 requires 18 - 52 V phantom power. Applications - Live and studio vocals, lead and backing - Speech - Acoustic instruments Please see the spec sheet under the specifications tab for more information about this product.
  14. Robert Lunte

    Microphone Ergonomics

    Received my new Shure BETA 57a today. Mic Ergonomics is an important consideration. I typically don't use the front line Shure live mics because there are so many other, more exotic options to use that sound just as great if not better. However, I do like the thin "shank" on this mic because it fits well in a singer's hand. Ok, I'm microphone geeking. Thanks to Robert Gardunia, my student for the inspiration to add one to my collection.
  15. Hi guys, so after some constructive criticism from some youtubers I recently purchased Reaper, and my friends and I are looking to do some better quality recording for some youtube covers and eventually some originals. I have done tons of research on recording and vst plugins, and I have my mind pretty much made up on all of them except for the vocals. Because I am singing in such a niche genre, I am not really sure what vocal plugins would be best for what I am going to be doing specifically.I have a very low bass voice, and we are mostly going to be doing Type O Negative covers and other bands of the same sort, so I want something either geared towards that or something that at least has the tools to handle it. I am going to include a few links for the sound that I am trying to replicate.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xD5No_JRrZwhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Y0WKslm-3khttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiOZ6VlM91Mhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyhLdI9fcH0As you can see, all these bands have a sort of "epic" sound to the vocals which is what I am looking for, of all the dozens of videos I have seen on vocals or articles I have read, they are mainly describing how to get a commercial radio sound, which is not at all what I am looking for. There are 2 main things I was wanting help with from this post, one help picking out a vocal plugin, and secondly help with just a general starting point how to achieve their vocal sound.I know that there is no all in 1 vocal processor that is better than buying the individual plugins, but I was hoping for some recommendations for a beginner like myself in a bundle. As I said, I have done months of research on this so I am not a complete idiot on the subject, but ease of use and hopefully many presets that would be useful for my purposes would be ideal.And secondly achieving that sound, I know you can't cram years of vocal editing advice into a reply, but I was hoping for just a general starting point for me to go from. I just don't have the ear to be able to tell what they are doing. Effects? Number of vocal tracks? Just the basic stuff.Also what would be a basic starting point for eqing my type of voice, I know you are supposed to boost what sounds good and cut out what sounds like crap, but I am not experienced enough to know what that is. Here is a link to a Woods of Ypres song, and then our cover of it to see what I am working with. Was just recorded with the camera mic.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-zSyRQ5evEhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-Af9UMqRCEEquipment list:UR44 Audio InterfaceSM7B mic with cloudlifterAs I said, I have also pretty much made up my mind on the other plugins, but I am going to list them here, and if anyone has a better product in mind for what I am going to be doing, I am all ears! Thanks, Brad
  16. Hi guys, so after some constructive criticism from some youtubers I recently purchased Reaper, and my friends and I are looking to do some better quality recording for some youtube covers and eventually some originals. I have done tons of research on recording and vst plugins, and I have my mind pretty much made up on all of them except for the vocals. Because I am singing in such a niche genre, I am not really sure what vocal plugins would be best for what I am going to be doing specifically.I have a very low bass voice, and we are mostly going to be doing Type O Negative covers and other bands of the same sort, so I want something either geared towards that or something that at least has the tools to handle it. I am going to include a few links for the sound that I am trying to replicate.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xD5No_JRrZwhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Y0WKslm-3khttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiOZ6VlM91Mhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyhLdI9fcH0As you can see, all these bands have a sort of "epic" sound to the vocals which is what I am looking for, of all the dozens of videos I have seen on vocals or articles I have read, they are mainly describing how to get a commercial radio sound, which is not at all what I am looking for. There are 2 main things I was wanting help with from this post, one help picking out a vocal plugin, and secondly help with just a general starting point how to achieve their vocal sound.I know that there is no all in 1 vocal processor that is better than buying the individual plugins, but I was hoping for some recommendations for a beginner like myself in a bundle. As I said, I have done months of research on this so I am not a complete idiot on the subject, but ease of use and hopefully many presets that would be useful for my purposes would be ideal.And secondly achieving that sound, I know you can't cram years of vocal editing advice into a reply, but I was hoping for just a general starting point for me to go from. I just don't have the ear to be able to tell what they are doing. Effects? Number of vocal tracks? Just the basic stuff.Also what would be a basic starting point for eqing my type of voice, I know you are supposed to boost what sounds good and cut out what sounds like crap, but I am not experienced enough to know what that is. Here is a link to a Woods of Ypres song, and then our cover of it to see what I am working with. Was just recorded with the camera mic.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-zSyRQ5evEhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-Af9UMqRCEEquipment list:UR44 Audio InterfaceSM7B mic with cloudlifterAs I said, I have also pretty much made up my mind on the other plugins, but I am going to list them here, and if anyone has a better product in mind for what I am going to be doing, I am all ears!
  17. Version

    0 downloads

    Gary Osborne is the founder and inventor of Lampifier Microphones. Lampifier Microphones feature a unique, build in compression solution that uses light as its medium. Lampifier microphones are great microphones and offer an interesting and unique solution to compression for singers. Gary Osborne www.Lampifier.com

    Free

  18. Version

    0 downloads

    John Gresko is the founder of Direct Sound and inventor of Extreme Isolation Headphones. The best isolation headphones available to singers in the world. John Gresko www.ExtremeHeadphones.com

    Free

  19. Leo Golub

    We present VocalCare®

    Thank managers as well so to admit to all the members that make up this prestigious group. I want to tell about VocalCare® because that will be useful to you all.Many professionals in various disciplines who need and depend on their voice to perform work: singers, vocalists, coreutas, comedians, drivers on radio or TV, actors, lecturers, teachers, trainers, broadcasters, entertainers, business consultants and sales, telemarketers, pastors, etc.They use for many hours a day the voice as a basic tool to develop their work.Who must preserve your voice various factors that require daily.To all of them is aimed VocalCare®.And of course we realize that with the constant demands that arise on a day to day wear are produced in our tool, either by endogenous factors (inherent in ourselves or we can prevent), as well as exogenous factors ( we can not control or predict), which can produce significant changes in the organs that produce the voice and consequently deficits.The need to preserve our voice in optimal conditions led us to develop the most complete line of natural products for voice care !!VocalCare® is the answer to a better quality of life that helps us to protect and develop the most valuable asset we have: our voice !! More additional information on our website www.vocalcare.net
  20. Hi guys, as some of you may know I am the happy owner of a vocal effects unit by Digitech (Vocalist Live FX), which I rely on to get a great sound when I'm performing or during band practice. I am not disputing which brand is the best/worst, but as I just stumbled on this short list from 2016, I thought it would be cool to share it with fellow members. I hope you enjoy it. Keep on Rocking! https://www.gearank.com/guides/vocal-effects-pedal
  21. I just have a basic question about performing live. Do vocalists/singers use any effects while they perform live, assuming it depends on genre if they actually do. I was debating this with a friend, I thought that most of them just used a somewhat studio-like effect while performing live and my friend told me most of the artists out there are purely singing with a clear voice without effects. So can anyone verify this? :-) Kind regards
  22. Hello ..long time reader of the forum. I don't think I have ever posted. I have a question if someone could help me. Is it possible to use the AX1 transmitter that comes with the Samson AirLine 77 with any of the Tc Helicon mics..The MP-75 or MP-76? I'm curious to see if you would still be able to control something like the Preform V. Thanks in advance for any help.
  23. Hi guys! I hope this type of thing is ok to post here. I know it's alway a bit iffy posting something like this as your first post in a forum, but I'm trying to find the spots on the web where singers that own some tech gear hang out. For my Bachelor thesis in music performance I'm researching vocal live effect devices. If you're at all using pedals or multi-effects operated on stage in your live performances, it would be super nice if you could fill out this survey! It is only part of a bigger research, so not very extensive and will only take a couple of minutes to fill out. https://shirschmann.typeform.com/to/eHCjUx
  24. guitarplayerjax

    "popper blockers" on live dynamic mics

    Has anyone here tried these? Unlike pop blockers used with condesors for recording, they install inside the mic ball head of the mic for live use. Probably simple to make your own for even cheaper. I saw a you tube video a while back that seemed to indicate in the demonstration it can reduce unintentional plosives like P's. Of course, having (or if needed, working on improving) good mic and vocal technique should greatly reduce those plosives anyway. If these really work, could sort of be insurance especially if the mic doesn't good pop blocking ability (some dynamics ball grills naturally block plosives to a good degree). With that said, if they may degrade tonal quality would probably be better off with no pop blocker.
  25. TMV World Team

    TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 Review

    INTRODUCING THE TC HELICON VOICE LIVE TOUCH 2 They call it a "Vocal-Designer". Interesting, I thought to myself while unpacking the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 from its box. As the name implies TC-Helicon has released a new version of its innovative 'Touch' series which builds upon the original Voice Live Touch. I'll be upfront and say that I never had the opportunity to try out the original Voice Live Touch so this review will strictly be based on my experience with the new unit: the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2. Gone are the colorful touch pads and diminutive LED screen. Instead, the Touch 2 is more serious wrapped in subdued grey with a much more usable LCD screen. Being this is a very menu driven device I imagine this is a welcome change to the original Touch users. TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2: Build This product can be purchased at The Vocal Gear Store. As with all TC-Helicon gear, the build quality of the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 makes it feel like every bit of its $500 street value. There are no manual knobs and buttons on the Touch 2. Instead, every control aside from a mic gain knob is a touch pad. It's an interesting design concept that is going to work for some but may be troublesome for others. The layout is generally straightforward and once you get a hold of the basics of how to drive into settings, the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 is fairly intuitive. I wish TC Helicon had given thought to backlighting their pads as I can see having issues in a dark club environment finding the right pad to hit, especially if you prefer as I do to not stand mount it. As a workaround, I highly recommend using their 3 button foot control available for purchase separately. TC Helicon touts the VL2 as giving singers "unprecedented creative control of their live sound with state-of-the-art vocal effects and performance looping in an intuitive touch layout." This I agree with. The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 packs an enormous catalog of preset effects to get you started sorted by genre such as Rock, Pop, Alternative etc. that mock the vocal effects used on a large v ariety of hit socks. If that isn't enough they are continually updating the catalog that is downloadable directly to the VLT2's using VoiceLive support. The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 In Practice The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 is pretty much ready to go out of the box. Built in is TC's fabulous adaptive tone which automagically applies adaptive EQ, compression and de-ess to your voice. It almost always sounds great and it certainly does on the Touch 2. Every effect is just about infinitely customizable on the Touch 2 including all the usual suspects of HardTune, tap delay, reverb, harmony, doubling, choir, and transducer. However, I generally found myself starting with one of the built-in presets and then customizing it to fit my sound. One of the more interesting features added on the Touch 2 is an effects "slider" that allows you to a choc tweak with your sound as you go. TC has come a long ways with their harmony algorithms by syncing them up with instrument input to ensure they are always on point and realistic sounding. The Touch 2 adds to the flexility of this by incorporating 8 total voices (more than you'd likely every need) and what they call "RoomSense". If one doesn't have an instrument to plug into the VoiceLive, the two onboard microphones take it the chord structures based off what its hearing in the room to decide how to apply the harmonies. I would argue there's no replacement for real harmonies, but this comes so damn close that admittedly even I have started using them. Another key feature to point out is the 6 track TC VLOOP performance looper. This is where things can really get creative with the ability to record your vocals on the fly for up to 30 seconds. The Touch 2 is so intelligent that it will even quantize those for you for perfect loops. One you have your loops you than then add Reverse, Filter, Slow Speed, Squeeze and Squeeze Auto to really make things interesting. Overall I felt that the looper was well done and simple enough that it could be used in a live situation. CONCLUSIONS about The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 is without question an extremely powerful tool. At the end of the day, it does however, cater itself slightly more towards the studio and solo artist than it does to more of a rocker like myself. I felt the menu-driven design and touch interface left me spending more time in trial and error before finding a sound than I would have spent flipping a knob or hitting a switch on the Voice Tone series pedals. In my opinion, though, TC has found a niche within a niche market with the VLT2. If this looks like it might be your kinda thing I recommend you check it out.