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Found 4 results

  1. This is a subject that appears often and always stir the same kind of debate, so please READ this post carefuly before making a new thread on the matter. New threads with the following subject: "What is my vocal fach?" "I can hit a G9 on chest voice, what is my fach?" "I think I am a bass, can I sing jazz?" "Is singer Joe Blow a bass or a soprano?" Will either be closed or have their contents moved into this thread, so please exercise your reading. Let's begin. The fachs, with their respective most common tessituras are: Male voices: - Bass - F2 - F4 - Baritone - A2 - A4 - Tenor - C3 - C5 Female voices: - Alto - F3 - F5 - Mezzo - A3 - A5 - Soprano - C4 - C6 Now the catch to this is: - These fachs are only relevant on the execution of classical repertoire, so for pop singing, this information is not relevant. While on classical a Bass will not perform a Tenor aria, on pop nothing prevents you from singing any song you want, even of opposite genders. If the range is too prohibitive, you can just change the key, and this is not the common case. - Classification is done based on tessitura. I can sing a F2 in voice with no problem when using a mic, it does not mean I am a Bass. If I tried to sing a Bass Aria nobody would hear me. So, range is not relevant for classification, neither high or low; - Because of the importance of tessitura on classification, it's necessary to receive the kind of training expected of the fachs (classical). And then, when issues with registraton and control are solved, your teacher will be able to tell you. You can classify your voice on your own by measuring the notes you sing comfortably without breaking and trying to fit it over there, but hardly it will be correct; - If you want to know the classification of your favorite singer, the best way to do so is to go ask him, I understand there is some fun involved on finding out the highest and lowest notes of those, but as said before, range is not relevant in this matter; - The fachs are a result of multiple factors, one of them being your physiology. Culture, personality, afinity with a certain kind of singing, and the direction taken on training can have a major influence on the outcome. So even on classical where it is really important, depending on your choices during training, fachs can vary and even change; - A perfect example of this is the difference of execution from male to female classical voices, that can be huge on the case of a soprano compared to a baritone, there are very different uses of registration and resonance strategies; - On that same line of thought, subclassifications are specializations, they are even more dependant on the training received. Lyric, dramatic, or coloratura loses its meaning almost completely on pop singing. So I suggest that we avoid taking a glance at a youtube video and going "definitely leggero tenor". And once more, please DO read the whole post.
  2. I recdntly got pillars and im really digging it. The thing is this. I understand the voice MUCH MUCH better now. All the terms used in singing are finally making sense to me and i can comfortably say that i can explain even to other people alot of crucial and scientific as well as practical information. Assuming that everyone can potentialy sing high notes, and i truly believe that because we have people right here on this forum who achieved just that, namely Jens who is a huge inspiration to me. Now that said, how does one go about achieving vocal range expansion. Im interested in a MENTAL way as well as the PHYSICAL. Everyone wants to be able to phonate high frequencies and are impatient in doing so. Im one of them, BUT I DO realise that it takes TIME and COMMITMENT And that we are talking in terms of years and not months or weeks. So i was wondering how do you guys tackle expanding your range, in terms of training. I understand the scientific part of it and the theory on what i should be doing, like shifting resonant energy and maintain proper extrinsinc and intrinsic anchoring, namely respiration and voicebox muscles. Do you work on strenghtening the range you can phonate currently or do you try to focus on notes you CANT hit and strenghten that. For example i have a training workflow and a methodology that i trust completely. But how far should i take. When doing exercises do i stop at G4 which is a comfortable stable hogher note for me or do i try to go higher. Do i allow myself to break at A4 A#4 or do i leave that aside and strenghten what i have. Excuse me if this is a stupid question but its something that makes me think alot and gets me somewhat confused.
  3. I recently discovered my whistle register. I think I am doing it right, but I need to make sure I am. I don't want to do any damage to my vocal chords, as I am a good singer, and have always been told so. I consider myself good too. I can hit an f6 pretty effortlessly, but sometimes it's difficult to go higher. Sometimes I just can exhale and it comes out great, but other times it seems like I need to almost squeeze a bit to get higher? They also sometimes sound really shaky, like in the second video below. My whistles also sound squeaky. I am a young female singer, btw. My problem is I am not sure if I'm doing it right, and when I descend slowly down to a high c, my voice cracks and I end up singing an e5. really weird, I know. I am trying to connect my head voice with my whistle voice because they are disconnected and I am worried I am doing it wrong. Sometimes, it's also hard to do whistle tones, but usually I can get them easily. However, when I try to sing along to a song with a whistle section in it (the way, ariana grande) I can't do it well. I can do random pitches, but in order to do a melody, I can't because it connects head voice and whistle tone, for example: in the song, it starts with a b5 then a c6 and goes up to f6, but I'm not connected in my head voice and whistle. How can I connect them? also, my whistle tones are squeaky. Any help? :/ Here is my video on a simple f6 down to d6 whistle tone: https://youtube.com/watch?v=X8Q5kLpP1Uk Now here is what keeps happening, the cracking at c6: https://youtube.com/watch?v=p4f9DvBG0yQ
  4. i find it difficult singing high pitch,something when i sing it,i cant control it,it wil be noise,so i need someone who can tell me the secret of singing high pitch.