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Found 20 results

  1. Perhaps someone who is not really talked about is Lefty Frizzell. Lefty Frizzell was once a big country music star in the 40s, 50s and 60s; he at one time was competing with Hank Williams in the top charts, and toured with him many times. Lefty had a distinctive voice that influenced the likes of George Jones, Randy Travis, and many others. Leftys singing style was unique from the other singers from his time, he would sound out syllables for a longer amount of time than most singers, a vowel bending style is what it has been called too. How does someone try and attem
  2. Hey Guys, i am really struggling to make progress with my high screams. I bought Ken Tamplins course a while back and studied and praticed to it alot, my singing doesn't have much to do with his though, because it never really worked out for me. The head voice part just lacked alot of information. I can't sing aaah or aeh in head voice. Above around d5 it just cracks at it feels really bad. I am doing pretty good with all the other vowels, the female soprano voice works well etc. its just that i feel like i can't even make my headvoice stronger because i can't open it up. I can go higher with
  3. Hey guys. So I've been singing for some years now. I'm classicaly trained, theoretically a tenor, but I could never manage to understand and make the adjustments to go higher than F4 without breaking into M2 or straining a lot. Last year I started reading a lot about voice physiology and learning contemporary singing technique. Now I can go sometimes even up to G5 (not a pretty singable tone yet, but it's there). From Bb4 up I can somehow manage a lighter sound that doesn't sound like M2, but between E4 and A4 I can only do full-on belting or something lighter but with a lot of constriction (a
  4. Hi, I have always, as long as I have defined my self as a singer, experienced periods of bad vocal health. Over time I have learned better technique and learned to sing smart and kind of use damage control paths through songs on rough days but I find it really hard to just surrender to not knowing what really goes on. Problem is basically this. During periods which can last from a few days to a few months in row, I experience like some configuration just goes out after just a very short time singing notes over the passagio. What happens after this is that my falsetto/neutral is f
  5. Robert Lunte & RØDE Microphones present four weeks of vocal training in Germany, Italy and France. April, 2018. For information click the links below or reach out to the people tagged in this post. See you in April! TVS Events Page http://bit.ly/TVSEvents Download The Tour Poster HERE: http://bit.ly/TVSMCTourSpring2018 14-15 APR Ansbach, Germany http://bit.ly/TVSMCAnsbachGermany 21-22 APR Pescara, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCPescaraItaly 28-29 APR Cagliari, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCCagliariItaly 1-2 MAY Nimes, France http://b
  6. So here is my cover of Steelheart's I'll Never Let You Go. Let me know what you think of it. I do accept all sorts of criticism regardless of whether it's positive and negative. Any suggestions or tips on how to improve I would greatly appreciate it!
  7. I had mentioned this singer "Chris Stapleton" in another thread. Thought I'd share this video/song he recently published. I was really struck by the numerous examples of solid vocal athleticism that arise in this performance. I try not to overanalyze every good vocal too often, cuz sometimes I loose the "soul" of the song in my ear from all of the deconstruction I use to understand the vocal. Couldn't resist on this one. Still "hearing the soul" to date. I've tagged all the key words that I believe I recognize "done well" in this composition. Personally, I'm most impressed with his
  8. This is just a quick recording, Using what I call "Fake" voice. I am playing with a little rasp. While growing up and singing with relatives they would condemn me for NOT using "MY NATURAL" voice. So I got stuck thinking to "Fake it" was a wrong thing to do. I think that some of this is on the right path to "Singing" rather than what I was doing before and thinking that I was "Singing" using my "Natural" voice. So if you would .......... Point out what is "Right" rather than just saying it sucks and I need more lessons. Thanks.
  9. Hey everyone! Just wanted to check in with some interesting reflections that I had recently with the folks who could benefit. So for background, I recently started med school and we have to take a pretty detailed course in gross anatomy that covers the entire body head to toe. I found that as a singing student, learning gross anatomy in lab and lecture has been extremely beneficial. There are so many things that we talk about and try to cue ourselves and others to do in order to achieve certain qualities in vocal production that now seem so much less mysterious, mystical, and/or unclear to me.
  10. Vocal Twang is a term that refers to a physical configuration for the singing voice that is characterized by tilt of the thyroid cartilage, compression on the vocal folds and an amplification of the voice. This "vocal mode" is ESSENTIAL for great singing. It is the most important physical setup that a singer needs to train to develop to become a great singer. Vocal Twang explanations, techniques and training are all provided in The TVS training program, "The Four Pillars of Singing". www.TheFourPillarsofSinging.com. WHAT IS VOCAL TWANG?
  11. Vocal Twang is a term that refers to a physical configuration for the singing voice that is characterized by tilt of the thyroid cartilage, compression on the vocal folds and an amplification of the voice. This "vocal mode" is ESSENTIAL for great singing. It is the most important physical setup that a singer needs to train to develop to become a great singer. Vocal Twang explanations, techniques and training are all provided in The TVS training program, "The Four Pillars of Singing". www.TheFourPillarsofSinging.com. WHAT IS VOCAL TWANG?
  12. So is that possible by nature or it is just a goodtehnique?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6uexPmL0fk
  13. In every other thread on this forum I've seen references to something called 'vocal twang' and, as I'm new, I don't have a clue what this is and googling wasn't a great help. So if I need to learn how to do it, I will first need to know what it is. So, can somebody please explain it to me and give tips on how it is achieved (when I sing I sound dull and nasal because when I talk I sound dull and nasal).
  14. Hi all, I recently finished this cover, I hope you like the vocals. Rob Zombie - American Witch Cover by OGregomixmaster Many thanks, Than
  15. I was thinking of this and I'd love to hear your opinions, especially from the voice teachers. Let's say a singer tried an experiment. He committed to practicing every day where he has to run the voice up his range and he had to avoid any kind of bridging, no letting go into falsetto, no transitioning...nothing... just had to run the full voice up all through just sheer will and determination. So any scale, any siren any voice exercise had to be done in full voice. No use of any heady placement, just pull up chest higher and higher..... I wonder,,,,,Would the voice eventually find it's way al
  16. The vocals on this entire album are mind blowing!!!   Listen To This!     Freddy Curci         Freddy Curci on Wikipedia
  17. Love These Vocals!   Rob Halford Was GREAT!    "Screaming For Vengeance"       1:15 - 1:30 - Amazing Edging skills here. Lots of twang compression and guiding the resonant energy and sound color right to the forward, hard palette to make it sound more "metal" or brighter. Not a lot of jaw movement through this passage, and thats great! Halford is very efficient with the embouchure throughout this song...    3:56 - 3:59, another great moment with good, tight edging pops right to the front of the hard palette.   You also have to apprecia
  18. Ok... is it only me... or is John Arch one of the coolest, most original sounding rock singers ever?!  I love the way this guy sings. Yes, I know it is a bit "quacky", but he has taken that sound color and made it his signature. He also has these fantastic little vocal riffs... check out the signature John Arch riff at 3:46 - 3:48.. and 3:56... that is "so John Arch".    Anyways... anyone have any thoughts about this cat? Can anyone analyze the intervals of the riff at 3:46 and determine what scale/mode that is coming from because he uses this a lot. It sounds very modal, or m
  19. Any Estill experts here? I've come to realize that the main thing that has been holding me back is that I can't get thyroid tilt to happen in thick folds. I have been trying for a very long time now and nothing seems to work. I can make it happen only in very thin. Someone once brought my attention to the fact that one unmistakable sign that thyroid tilt is happening is that an octave feels extremely small, which is due to the fact that the folds are already pulled tighter and the arytenoids have to move less to reach higher notes. In my thinnest thin, I can make it happen easily, but otherwis
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