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Found 124 results

  1. Hello, I am a music education student and was wondering how to go about explaining to middle schoolers what is happening to their voice when it changes? I've been struggling to find a way to tell them about puberty without having a whole class of laughing middle schoolers. Any suggestions would help greatly!
  2. What are some suggestions for exercises and repertoire for helping a student gain strength and control in their lower register? Also suggestions for going between chest voice and mixed voice?
  3. How do you work to balance group singing and individual singing assessment, especially when some students have performance anxiety?
  4. How do you find ways to encourage instrumentalists to feel comfortable answering questions related to singing? Examples like: How to chose repertoire for a beginning singer or what kind of vocal inefficiency is there? (Assuming they do not have much experience singing themselves) I have found that it is hard for me to get them to join the conversation during lessons in our pedagogy class. I don't want them to feel like I am calling them out, but I also really want more participation from them in general. What do you all suggest I do?
  5. How can you help teach a student to naturally let vibrato happen? For example if a student has been previously taught to sing with a mostly straight tone or reprimanded by people for singing with vibrato and doesn't know how to let it naturally happen, how do you teach that? Especially if it occasionally will come through in their lower register but they really struggle with it in the upper register?
  6. Since the introduction of recording, bands and artists have used specific microphones to capture sound from the entire room. Unfortunately, once captured, trying to fix certain sounds or mistakes was next to impossible. This is where Zylia comes in with their ZM-1 Microphone. It makes use of 19 separate condenser microphones that are spread across the spherical body, as well as a single LED ring that runs through the equator of the device to indicate its recording functionality. Essentially, recordists have the ability to capture a 3D, 360-degree sound, as well as traditional stereo. We like to think of it as the virtual reality of the audio world. Let's dive into our Zylia ZM-1 Review to see what this bad boy is all about. Specs 19 Microphone Omnidirectional Digital MEMS Capsules LED Ring Status Recording Indicat0r 48 kHz / 24-bit Recording USB Connectivity 20-20,000 Hz Frequency Range The Review Overall, the ZM-1 is impressive. It is easy to see something like this and think that it might be a gimmick, as there is a hollow character with many of these types of microphones. Luckily, it's just not the case. The Zylia ZM-1 comes with a tabletop stand and a threaded microphone stand, which allows you to place it just about anywhere in the room. It connects to your computer via USB and uses special software to get it going. It is as simple as setting your microphone up in the middle of the room, calibrating it, and recording. The software will even ask you what kind of instruments you are recording before asking you to play an eight-second bit on each of the instruments so that it can find the instruments in the space. Though you might have to move the instruments around in the room a bit to get the mix that you desire, the software gives you the ability to tweak the mix much more than you'd think. Let's say your guitar that was placed in the corner of the room needs to be turned up. You can simply adjust that guitar in correlation with the microphone that was picking it up the most. Essentially, you get a room recording with multi-track session editing capability. The track separation is impeccable. Even the small amounts of bleed can be tweaked using regular DAW software in post. It is great for picking up live performances and crowd responses at the same time, perfect for those who are looking to record a live EP, for example. You can even use it to capture 360-degree audio for YouTube of Facebook, making the creation of enveloping soundscapes a breeze. Pros and Cons Pros Innovative Design Perfect For Live Performances High-Quality Audio Capturing Solid Software Tweak-ability Cons None that that are worthy of mentioning. Not really... Should You Buy It? The Zylia ZM-1 is a well-executed recording device that delivers beautiful room recordings with the ability to edit and re-mix well after the fact. There is nothing currently available that we've found that can do what this thing can do. Yes, it might take a bit to get used to, but once you get it set up, it is the perfect device for on-the-spot recordings in just about any space you can think of. Don’t leave without grabbing The Four Pillars of Singing if you haven’t already and make sure to subscribe to our Facebook group to get all of the vocal information you could possibly need! If you currently use the Zylia ZM-1 let us know what you think in the comments!
  7. Has anybody else noticed the number of vocal coaches on YouTube? It use to be only a few. Lol Now there are hundreds, maybe even thousands. Some are good but many can't sing well at all. Some of them have hundreds of thousands (even millions) of views. What is going on here? Are they qualified or do they just setup shop? Crazy.
  8. To the point: There are some *smart* voice teachers displaying before and after of their students as a sign of improvement and that are deliberately faking results and exploiting recording conditions to create the illusion that their singing method produces *huge* voices. In this particular case I saw, the teacher compares a dry and very clean/honest recording of a students voice on a controlled volume level (meaning that it was properly gain staged for the best possible audio fidelity) and low to no reverb, which would be the before, with a badly distorted/digitally clipped sample of the same student singing where you can't even hear what the guy is doing anymore, which then would be the result of the training. Guys, when you hear a distorted AND louder audio, of course it will sound *huge* compared to a clean version of the same, but this is not a consequence of the singer technique being better, it's just poorly captured and louder. In the sample I received an audio engineer was able to restore a bit of the audio and you could hear the student having issues with the phrase and cracking on it, something that was completely hidden by the distortion. The fact that the distortion itself happens is being used as a sign of competence too, something like *it's so loud the recording equipment can't handle it*. This is non-sense. Certainly if you do not set the gear properly when you go loud, it clips, I did this mistake myself on a few of my videos, but it's all it is, a mistake when recording. Except that on this specific case the effect is being deliberately exploited so I would not call it a mistake either. Loud/Clipped recordings does not mean huge voices. Pay attention to what you are being shown!!
  9. Hello, my 10 year old daughter is an aspiring singer. She is in voice lessons and has been in some musical theater productions as well. We understand she is not necessarily a "natural", but she does have the drive and desire and truly loves performing. Any thoughts or suggestions for improvements are welcomed to help her with her goal of becoming a singer one day? She has sung the National Anthem at a couple college sports events and a professional event. I am also including a link for one of her musical theater shows, Music Man. Thank you in advance! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUg--tK829M (National Anthem) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8lGocVKUHw (Goodnight my Someone)
  10. What are some techniques that will help a student learn how to use good breath support?
  11. I'm working with a voice student who struggles with breath support and applying that to her singing. Any suggestions for exercises, application techniques, choral excerpts, etc. for "breath application"?
  12. Which vocal course is best? (I want sing mainly rock - from art rock, blues rock, swing to heavy metal but too can sing most of music genre) I hear (mostly) good opinions about: Ken Tamplin Vocal Academy and course '' How To Sing Better Than Anyone Else '', Kevin Richards (Rpm Vocal Studio) and course '' Breaking The Chains '' ''Superior Singing Method'' of Aaron Anastasi And '' Singing Success 360'' of Brett Manning What do you think about these courses and which is best and help me 'increase' my voice? - Lyssie
  13. I am teaching a voice student currently who has trouble retaining pitches in her head while she sings. When given pitches on the piano, she has good aural skills to correct herself. Do you have any suggestions of what types of exercises I can use to help her learn how to better retain pitches in her head? Thank you.
  14. MAESTRO DAVID KYLE THE WINDOW OF FAME Vocal teacher for all styles for over 50 years, David Kyle, The “Maestro” became a local Seattle icon and was considered by the industry to be one of the best vocal instructors for contemporary singers in the world. Unique to the “Maestro’s” approach was his method for expanding vocal range into multiple “registers”, or what we would refer to today at TVS as, "Bridging & Connecting". Maestro was also keen on eliminating psychological barriers that hinder singers’ freedom of expression, by use of creative visualization techniques and development of healthy auditory imagery for singing. One day, Nate Burch, one of my students from Seattle, came to the lesson with an old coffee stained piece of paper that had a hand written, transcribed lecture from Maestro Kyle on it. An excerpt from that lecture is shared below as well as popular quotes that Maestro Kyle used to use with all his students. Maestro David Kyle & Robert Lunte - The Vocalist Studio MAESTRO DAVID P. KYLE LECTURE: Those sounds which seem to ring the most are usually the best. Those which seem the roundest are usually the best. Those which seem to resonate are usually the best. Those which seem to echo are usually the best. So listen out into the theater and see if they are echoing, and if they are round, and they are resonant. Connect your notes and don’t be afraid. There are two kinds of stars. There are “stars” and there are “superstars.” The star no matter how he tries he just can’t seem to become a superstar. He’s great, great, great, great, but along comes a Caruso, or a Lanza, or a Gigli, and he can’t quite get over the hurdle. It’s because of one simple thing. The star sings, and when he’s singing he listens to himself; and while he’s listening he shapes it; and he opinionates it; and he shapes it around. If it isn’t round enough he rounds it more. And that sounds logical doesn’t it? It’s wrong! The superstar pictures the sound and knows what he wants to hear before he makes it! Singing is more the concept than anything. If we’ve got the right idea, then the muscles as they train more and more they become like a reflex and the reflexes respond to the image. Even if you’re trained beautifully and your image is a fear that you haven’t got high notes and it’ll never get there the reflexes won’t respond no matter how well trained you are. The epitome of it is you can say singing is absolutely mental. In the process of getting to realize that you have to take a lot of physical steps before you begin to see it, but it is true! The singer has to be in the consciousness and the mood. How does one establish a consciousness and a mood? You tend to become as you act. So if you pretend and try to get your feelings to act as you think they would act if you were doing it, then you’re getting in the consciousness. But if our consciousness is only on body and physical things then our mind is... The rest of the lecture offers another 5 pages of incredible insights about how the mind controls the singing voice. Read the entire lecture in The Four Pillars of Singing. Maestro David Kyle - The Vocalist Studio Maestro David Kyle Quotes “Good singers sing and listen, Great singers listen, then sing” “Good speech is half sung, but good singing is not half spoken.” “Wear the world like a loose garment. Don’t let it tighten in on you.” “Suppose you were learning to drive a car. Would it be better to learn on a road with no obstructions?” “Every negation is a blessing in disguise.” “The art of the art is the art that conceals the art.” “He who would know aught of art must first learn and then take his ease.” “When you open up you should be able to see light from both ends.” “Feel like you are singing with your whole body.” “Your reflexes respond to your image.” “The reflexes respond to the imagination.” “Listen away from yourself.” “Sing on the balls of your feet, like the American Indian.” “Burn Bridges and don’t look back.” “Listen away from yourself, right out into the auditorium.” “Singing is both a science and an art. All art is all imagination and you cannot fix that.” “You have to believe you will receive before you receive and then you will get it.” “Visualize you are already what you want to be. Act as if you are that, and you will become it.” “If you always notice what you are while trying to get there, you’ll never get there.” “Start as if the sound begins before the breath.” “The end is in the beginning, and the beginning is in the end.” “It’s not a game I’m playing! If you think that you’re short changing yourself.” “People don’t get tired of their work; they get tired of the resistance to their work.” “Forever diet the voice. Diet the voice; diet the mind; diet the spirit; diet everything but your income!” “Feel like your whole self is all a part of the sound, like the full violin is just vibrating.” “Imagine the sound you want, picture the sound you want.” “Open up the entire body and see the light through both ends!” “Breath, pause, release the jaw, visualize the sound you want, and sing to the back of (Carnegie Hall).” “We don’t let attitudes control us, we control them!” “Only babies are victims of moods!” “Let the sound flow right over the roof of the mouth into the masque.” “Bowels up, vowels forward.” “Some day you’re going to stand up and say, ‘This is me’ and go!” “We tend to become as we act.” “Attitude is everything in everything.” “Every time you find your thinking going to the strain or the resistance, immediately create mentally the sound that you want, hear what you want.” “And remember you have a beautiful voice. At your worst you sound better than many of them at their best!” “Just don’t sound like everyone else!” “And tell it your singing marvelous, you’re singing wonderfully!” “Sing Away from yourself, to something.” “Listen, then sing!” “Way to go Baby!” Maestro David Kyle passed on Saturday, November 27th of 2004 OTHER VOICE COACHES OF ROBERT LUNTE...
  15. Vocal Athlete Intensive Seattle, WA USA - May 14th - 18th Five (5) Day Vocal Intensive to ACHIEVE YOUR VOCAL POTENTIAL with Robert Lunte & Draven Grey.RESULTS: Take ownership of your voice with hands-on, results-driven coaching. You will learn the top tested exercises and get the feedback for doing them correctly.CONFIDENCE: Get behind the mic knowing exactly what to do and how to do it. Sing with confidence from a solid vocal foundation with a performance that is uniquely you.MASTERY: Achieve your vocal potential. With a proven pedagogy for modern singing, we will show you the way out of vocal frustration into mastery.Study with Robert Lunte, Founder of The Vocalist Studio, author of critically acclaimed vocal training system The Four Pillars of Singing and internationally recognized voice training school for hundreds of voice coaches. Draven Grey is an accomplished musician, vocalist, rock singing teacher and music industry expert. He has coached bands across the world in their careers, released multiple books and course on the music industry. www.VocalAthleteIntensive.com ******************* Be sure to check out the Facebook Event and show your interest: https://www.facebook.com/events/158276921614589/ *******************
  16. Robert Lunte & RØDE Microphones present four weeks of vocal training in Germany, Italy and France. April, 2018. For information click the links below or reach out to the people tagged in this post. See you in April! TVS Events Page http://bit.ly/TVSEvents Download The Tour Poster HERE: http://bit.ly/TVSMCTourSpring2018 14-15 APR Ansbach, Germany http://bit.ly/TVSMCAnsbachGermany 21-22 APR Pescara, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCPescaraItaly 28-29 APR Cagliari, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCCagliariItaly 1-2 MAY Nimes, France http://bit.ly/TVSMCNimesFrance If you have any questions about the event or private lessons, contact me on my personal email or here at TMV World. I look forward to helping you with your singing. You will get results, guaranteed.
  17. I'm unaware if this video has been posted here before. I think it underscores what's wrong with some vocal coaches who seem to remain stuck in outdated teaching methods from circa 1985. I would have come away from my first voice lesson with the exact same opinion were it not for the fact that a major rock star told me his coach increased his vocal range, stamina, and power significantly! I went to his same vocal coach. I went to the first lesson expecting that whatever the coach instructed was gold, and I was going to follow it blindly! After all, I had seen the results in a singer he taught! It's true, just like Grohl implies in this video, after that first lesson I thought, "it just seems bogus that these singing scales are gonna help me achieve what I'm wanting vocally!" There was very little in depth discussion about what the science of the vocal instruction was. It was just, take this cassette home of the scales I just recorded you singing, and practice them every day for at least an hour. Next week when you come back, we're gonna work on vibrato. Then the next lesson, another cassette, until a large volume of dollars drained out of my wallet. It's very cool how Rob Lunte blazed the trail on vocal pedagogy in the last 15+ years. It's a model that brings a more holistic and specialized comprehension, which translates into augmentation of vocal development/improvement. To say nothing of his engaging training system, and the re-engineering of "singing scales" or "vocal workouts" (chiefly - onsets) to maximize the students ability to feel more tangibly what is occurring in the vocal track, and why. I don't know who this coach was that Cobain went to, but you can see there wasn't enough understanding at the end of his lesson. AND, if Kurt blew his voice out, why did he come home with a cassette of scales? (see any of the youtube videos or threads on exercises for vocal damage). peace! k
  18. I am working with a new voice student. She has been a piccolo and flute 8+ years. I am trying to find some effective warm-ups for her. She is able to match pitch and has more confidence singing in her lower range. She has been recently singing with a very pressed sound and is very tense when beginning warm-ups. Trying to find warm-ups to help combat these things!
  19. How do you correct a vocal fault (that could be potentially harmful) when the student can’t comprehend what you’re telling them to do to change how they are singing?
  20. Robert Lunte from The Vocalist Studio provides an overview of the significance of the Bernoulli effect in singing and how understanding this principle, can help you to train more efficiently and gain more progress as a singer. This excerpt is from the 2nd webinar with Draven Grey.
  21. As I've mentioned in other posts, I've been taking lessons for a few months with an opera/musical theater singer, and I've played a whole lot of different singers I enjoy for her to hear her opinion, and I find it interesting to hear the impressions of someone from a different world and different sensibilities. I thought I'd compile all the ones I remember into a collection because I was also curious to hear reactions: Chris Cornell: Disliked. "He's just screaming in the one part. And his high notes are very thin, but he puts all the scream and effect on it. If you heard it without that stuff it would just be a very weak sound." Bruce Dickinson(Iron Maiden): Disliked. "Sound is thin, poor technique on higher notes, badly produced vibrato." Dio: Unimpressed. "Again, just a thin tenor putting some effect on his voice." Warrel Dane(Nevermore): Liked. "Good control. He's making a choice on every note." Eric Adams(Manowar): "One of the best sounds of all the singers you've played for me. But still a thinner tenor voice." Mike Patton: Liked. "Nice voice, clearly knows how to sing. But I wish I could hear his natural sound more instead of all this 'put on' stuff he does." Tarja Turunen and Marco Hietala(Nightwish): "You can hear both these people know how to sing correctly, they're just doing some weird things because that's the style I guess. Forcing the straight tones is making her sound flat, and she knows that, but she still does it." Devin Townsend: "If I were his ENT doctor, I'd love him, because of all the money I'd make form all the damage he's doing. He has to be on steroids to be doing what he does consistently. Either that or he's just a freak." Eric Clayton (Savior Machine): "Completely different from the other stuff you've shown me. Sounds like a regular baritone stage voice." Daniel Heiman (Lost Horizon): "Not bad. He's doing some of that weird stuff again, but he sounds good otherwise." Alissa White-Gluz (Arch Enemy): "Oh God, that's a woman!? I can't listen, it's too painful, she's ripping her vocal chords to shreds." Phil Anselmo (Pantera): "I guess it's...kind of like singing." Tim "Ripper" Owens (Judas Priest, Iced earth): "His voice will probably last a bit longer because he knows what he's doing and being very controlled about it." Mikael Akerfeldt (Opeth): "He's got a nice voice." Mikael Akerfeldt growling: "There's no way he's producing that sound naturally. Either that or he's doing it very quietly and it's made to sound much bigger."
  22. I'm a metal/progressive rock/classical guy taking lessons with a classical opera singer. It's always an interesting thing bringing her vocals to listen to. Some get better reviews than others, but the most common thing I hear from her is that the vast majority of vocalists are wrong for my voice, because they're just too high and light, and I have a bigger voice with a darker color. I kinda knew that was true of someone like James LaBrie, but Bruce Dickinson, Eric Adams, Dio, etc. I wouldn't have called them smaller voices, or the highest, or the thinnest, but to her they are. I one guy she thought was a bit closer match for my voice was Tim 'Ripper' Owens, or maybe that I could get get away with singing stuff from baritone-y guys like Eric Clayton of Savior Machine, who has a cool voice but it's usually a different thing. To her, a voice like Geddy Lee is just an exceptionally odd VERY light and high male voice, almost off the spectrum, and 90% of the rock singers out there are light, thin tenors. She asks if I have some other things to bring her that aren't like that, but it seems in rock, almost everyone has that sound, and with the exception of a few baritones here and there. The implication - the world of rock and pop is just filled to the brim with light tenors wherever you look these days. Even on Broadway these days this is all the rage: (Also interesting my teacher thought the composer should be shot for making the singer do that B5 at the end in that style, because it's certain to cause damage over time, and this singer did indeed have to take a break because of voice trouble I think). I mean, if you listen to something like this: ...this kind of voice can't help but sound a bit old fashioned. But really, it's just a natural male voice, singing as it would naturally sound. But there's practically no place for that voice in pop or rock, it seems. I suppose the question is, to what extent are we talking about just a lot of thin tenors, and to what extent are we talking about singers who might be baritones or low tenors, but who thinning their sound out, because that's the style?
  23. Hello everybody! So my last thread I asked for help on mixed/ middle register. I have been working on it for a little while now but I still feel like I'm shouting and using too much air on belting high notes. It's as if I'm trying to sing it rather than just letting the sound out. Here is a comparison: and me lol: Any tips or advice is appreciated. Don't know if I'm shouting because I can't get that cord closure properly in my higher registers or if it's a bunch of different things. Woke up a little hoarse today too after singing for around 2-3 hours heavily. this is so annoying Thank you ! Love this forum for all the help I get
  24. Hi to everyone! I've been reading this forum for a couple of years now and always found it very interesting and helpful in dealing with some of my own issues, so I thought I'd post this project that I've got going on. For a long time, I have suffered from vocal tension and inability to sing past D4 without pushing the "chest voice"/ overly-engaging the TA's basically. However, in the last year or so, I have experienced great relief after starting to do falsetto exercises suggested by Anthony Frisell in his manual "Training Baritone Voices". After reading many other sources later on, I have started questioning the usefulness of voice classification, purely from psychological point in the beginning (belief that one is a lower voice and its effect on the voice and singing), but now also physiological (neglecting upper range), especially in contemporary music (pop, rock, jazz, music theatre...). So now, I am writing a dissertation on the validity of voice classification in contemporary music and have already got some interesting answers. However, since there is barely any research done in relation to contemporary music, I would really be grateful if any of the members here, who give voice lessons, would participate. This is the link if anyone is interested: https://goo.gl/forms/uLMWByDMKYv4IWMk1 Thank you and feel free to spread the link if you find it useful! In general, I would also love to hear your opinions on this. Do you think tutors should classify their students and why?