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  1. Hello Fellow TMVW members! Humbling though it may be, I thought I would share a track I'm working on, (Beatles - In My Life) and the vocal "sculpting" process I go through in an effort to record my best performance. (I'd never share unfinished tracks except to friends and in this forum . . . plain vanity) I've had a lot of experience analyzing my vocals for recordings, I never quite knew how to articulate the process I was engaging in nearly as well as after having gone through The Four Pillars of Singing, learning the "talk track" I've heard Robert Lunte utilize across many hours of lecture videos! Once one is familiar enough with these "mechanisms" for mending, strengthening, or otherwise fine tuning a vocal line, the mystery about what to do goes away! Rob's techniques are structured in a simple, yet meticulous sequence that really does create the feeling of having a vocal sculpting tool box! I'm posting this both as a subject of interest to others who may be starting out with this type of challenge, and as a means of accountability for me to complete the process, which has been brutal for me due to inexperience with the recording software. It's good for me though, as I intend to record several old hit favorite song interpretations in the coming months. I'll post my final "sculpture" here for this track when I finally complete it. "Work to be done" on this vocal performance is: Pitchy lyrics / appaggio drop out, vowel mods for best resonance, better phrasing, embouchure brightening, slight lightening of mass throughout, . . . . I'm sure there's more, also, rhythm guitar mistakes, and guitar solo is not quite tight yet, not happy with the effects on my voice yet either. I'm contemplating leaving the last "in my life" line unresolved like it is now. I was trying to sing that last half of the last line and had to quit recording due to a leaf blower. I think i'll like it that way, maybe with a high harmony over the top. Lastly, I may end up using a different mic than I did for this take. One thing that clearly gets hammered home in this process is that performing live is a far more forgiving environment than being under the microscope of a recording. Peace, k
  2. A small vocal tip with huge benefits. My last video was about vowel anchoring and "up and over" to avoid vocal fatigue. This one is about finding "your voice" by choosing where that vowel anchor sits along the soft palate.
  3. Hi , here is my cover of "man against the world " originally performed by survivor . I sing it 4 half tons down , because i am not a high tenor like jimmy jamison. Please review and comment for me to improve my singing. Thank you
  4. Sorry about word timing... Still not sure how to swing the beats on this old song ... to make it more lively ... need to sing it for a wedding! Any suggestions for improvement would be so great, i.e. mixed voice, head voice, & chest voice form a coherent one voice? Love & peace
  5. Hello, I have been learning the various voice registers & applying to this song. Any suggestions on where to improve would be greatly appreciated, i.e. Do it sounds like one voice? or not yet? Love & peace
  6. Gill Appleby

    Mercedes Benz

    https://www.smule.com/recording/janis-joplin-mercedes-benz/1088277799_1420463658/ensembles Please excuse the outro. And yes it's me singing with JJ in the background. Thoughts?
  7. OMG Biff Byford modified his "oo" on "you" at 1:15 ... ?! Oh nooo!
  8. The vocal geek mind took over when I started watching this video of Joni back in '79 singing, "Goodbye Porkpie Hat." I've always been a fan of Joni and thinks she's a beautiful woman! I couldn't help but notice those big beautiful front teeth and I thought, "it's almost like she would never have to be reminded to keep a "wide" embochure (as most of us so easily forget to maintain when singing). Her consistent teeth bearing embouchure seems like the perfect "E.Q. balance" to her warm (larynx lowered) alto-ish tamber. Then, as I watched her sing (the camera angle is such as to give just the right view of her face), I'm noticing that she's singing all these cool lines with lots of vowel modifications as she sings lines that flow quickly up and down between M1 & M2. I thought it was a good example of someone masterfully applying the technique.
  9. It has been a while since I have presented anything. I still have not found time for true practice but I have improved since receiving the FOUR PILLARS OF SINGING. Any tips would be appreciated. Thanks
  10. Dear all, It has been a while that I have visited this forum. I have been very busy with my studies—having completed my BA in Musicology and currently finalising my MA in Applied Musicology. I did keep on working on my singing, however. Yesterday, “The Music of the Night,” a song that I auditioned with at the Conservatory of Rotterdam over a decade ago and that I had used for my singing lessons with many different teachers, was one I had never actually performed—until now! Indeed, there appears to be balancing issues with volume between me and the piano. On the other hand, I asked several attendees whether they felt there were problems with it, but they all did not notice them live. While I do think we could work on balancing our instruments, I believe the recording is augmenting the issue quite a bit. I am really satisfied with the performance—especially my acting abilities, intonation, enunciation, and stage presence. I could be more confident with the fermata notes just doing them as long as I want, rather than thinking I might do them too long (I think the “soul”-note [2:32] is great, the “be”-note [3:44] is just about right, the ”night”-note [5:20] is executed pretty well, but could easily be five seconds longer). I could also definitely stabilise and pronounce my “ring” more. Manolito Mystiq
  11. Kevin Ashe

    Control Master

    I had mentioned this singer "Chris Stapleton" in another thread. Thought I'd share this video/song he recently published. I was really struck by the numerous examples of solid vocal athleticism that arise in this performance. I try not to overanalyze every good vocal too often, cuz sometimes I loose the "soul" of the song in my ear from all of the deconstruction I use to understand the vocal. Couldn't resist on this one. Still "hearing the soul" to date. I've tagged all the key words that I believe I recognize "done well" in this composition. Personally, I'm most impressed with his mastery over what I would assume are the critical configurations which bring great resonance with comparatively low level respiration. I'm convinced that, with the best possible formant, combined with the strength support of skilled appoggio, the "illusion" of a belt is created. He is singing at a relatively low volume yet, the intensity of his voice is sustained. The same nuance is applied to his vocal distortion, which he employs mostly in the higher notes. Those are my impressions.
  12. I'm curious if I am doing this right... I'm not even sure how to explain it. Here is a guy teaching it .. it's in korean but he's basically saying try to "pull" the sound out from the chest instead of having the sound fly out through ur mouth. Can someone explain to me in what way is this taught normally? Is this just the feel of "open throat?" or "support"? AND if this is how it should feel then how do I get that "mask" placement without losing that DEEP breath support? This way helped me develop my mix but I'm curious if this method is correct and is just another way of teaching the same thing? example done by a professional performance. (The sound literally sounds like a really low soft mix voice in the intro and when belting it sounds like the vibrato is so free and resonating really low. Is this how proper singing should be done? I am just wondering on how I should properly train and do warmups/workouts..
  13. Hi Folks, I came across this video on youtube that advocates a support based singing technique(based on what I understood) that can eliminate vowel modification. Can folks please weigh in on how this works? Is it possible for a tenor to sing upto B4 using this technique and get a dark colored sound without vowel modification? Can someone tell me what is the physical sensation that best in your mind describes, "leaning into the sound". Thank you..
  14. Yo! All my fellow singing geeks! I came across the article I've linked here (below video). I thought it is was very well written (a quick read), and includes a couple comments by Justin Stoney (coach most of us probably know from Youtube). I have read & posted in our "techniques" forum regarding so called "Natural Singers," percentages of the population who are or are not, training, and etc. Hope this helps lend some clarity to the matter(s). article - Singing Tips: Have A Certain Skull Shape, And Other Science Behind Carrying A Tune http://www.medicaldaily.com/singing-tips-have-certain-skull-shape-and-other-science-behind-carrying-tune-308372
  15. Hello guys! I am just curious about this singer's voice and volume when he sings. I notice it is very airy and I know singing with excessive air is bad for your chords, but is there something about his technique or voice that allowed him to sing so long with a healthy voice? (10+ years) I also get very confused on how loud to sing when singing such songs. I guess it is a common problem in a sense when I sing very softly, I can reach those notes easily with my head voice with very little chord closure. OR I end up singing so loud where its basically belting with full chord closure. I can't for the life of me hit that middle area where there is JUST enough power while maintaining such a sweet tone without POWERING IT OUT. ( I am referring to the chorus) Any ideas? Thank you!
  16. Version

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    Steve Fraser is a noted expert on vowel modification, phonetics and formants for singing. Mr. Fraser is a recognized expert in the analysis of spectrograph analysis of singing. A spectrogram is a a time-varying spectral representation (forming an image) that shows how the spectral density of a signal varies with time. In the field of Time-Frequency Signal Processing, it is one of the most popular quadratic Time-Frequency Distribution that represents a signal in a joint time-frequency domain and that has the property of being positive. Mr. Fraser has a Bachelor’s in Vocal Music Education from Millikin University, and a Master’s in Choral Conducting from Washington University in St. Louis. Mr Fraser is also an active member at The Modern Vocalist World Forum. Steve Fraser www.SteveFraser.com

    Free

  17. aravindmadis

    The Clairvoyant - Aravind

    Have been meaning to cover this song for a while now. Bruce's tone is amazing in this song. What makes it so difficult is the number of closed vowels, especially in the chorus. Someday I would love to do a better version of the song, especially in the chorus. But for now I am very happy with the outcome for my current level. A big thank you to folks who give this a listen and drop a sentence or two...
  18. "White Rabbit" Tribute! I am proud to share a performance and production of Jefferson Airplane's classic, "White Rabbit". SaraEllen has been training with TVS for about two years. Excellent job SaraEllen! LOVE the curbing vowel resonance, steady embouchure, and "snappy" glottal attacks on the vowels, apart from the interpretation that captures the nuances we coached and discussed. Sounds great, looks great, a kick ass production and worthy achievement! Coach.
  19. I just have a basic question about performing live. Do vocalists/singers use any effects while they perform live, assuming it depends on genre if they actually do. I was debating this with a friend, I thought that most of them just used a somewhat studio-like effect while performing live and my friend told me most of the artists out there are purely singing with a clear voice without effects. So can anyone verify this? :-) Kind regards
  20. Hello guys, I am wondering why is it the the AE (bat) vowels and AH (father) vowels get a bad rap? In Lilli Lehmans book I recall she does not advocate using the AH vowel very much, also many teachers warn the AE vowel is "too wide" or splatty. I am not sure sure what this all means and would love to know why these vowels are portrayed negatively. Please share your thoughts below and your experience with these vowels if possible
  21. Felipe Carvalho

    Registration and Related Subjects

    Since every single thread recently seems to derail into a talk about registers in some manner, and no one made a thread for it, this will be around for a while. So if you feel like talking about M1, chest, head, falsetto, heady, mixed, or anything else of similar content, this is the place. Posts on other threads that do not have an objective and specific point in regards to the thread subject and that start to go in the direction of "M2 is the new M1" usuall conversations most likely will be deleted. "To do that thing well, keep in your normal voice, like this: sample shown" - Fine "In 1952 when observing the M3 register using high energy plasma on professional opera rockstars, scientists figure that..." - Should be in here What do you need to know about registers: There are five different ways of seeing this particular subject that comes to my mind right away: - A mechanical register: M0,M1,M2,M3 - An area of pitch: "All above note T4 is head, bellow, chest." - A quality or intensity used: Heady -> Soft. Chesty -> Strong, Mix -> middle. - A specific position of the vocal tract. - A sensation. The way it was used on classical technique, was more about the later two, and even so on its begining it was really just the sensation, that's where the names "chest" and "head" came from to begin with. What is important to keep in mind is that since its a reference of sensation, it does have pedagogic value but it will not reflect exactly into any of the first. There are specific coordinations that are know to produce the sensations, but they were unknown when the terms were first used and the ideals of both sounds and execution started to appear. This initial post will be updated with relevant information as it appears along the way. I will do an effort to include samples for each of the ideas, probably with the help of Dan and Jens if they are up to it :).
  22. Robert Lunte, "Timeless Chains". A song about my "x" Anna Christina. Enjoy. Silently your, beauty took my breath away... Now comes the rain, can I feel another day. So much time has past away from that fateful day. So much time has passed, since you turned away. Chorus Now timeless chains, there's no escape! You walked Away Just when I started to get my life back under me. Berlin skies of gray, so cold I cannot breath Cause I lost, mean Frau in the storm, that marked my destiny! But here I stand defiantly mending a heart ripped to shreds of tragedy But my face to the wind, Im washed from my sins, but you still keeps haunting me Chorus Timeless chains, there's no escape! You walked Away Just when I started to get my life back under me So much time has past away from that fateful day. So much time has passed since you turned away. Chorus Timeless chains, there's no escape! You walked Away Just when I started to get my life back under me!
  23. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>>
  24. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>> View full articles
  25. Hi all, If you looked at the "Vocal Health" sub forum, you might have a seen a few topics that I have opened regarding issues that I had and exercises that I do and help to fix my speaking voice. Basically I use singing vocal exercises that work on my lower "chest" voice range, more specifically Lip Rolls, "Ya"s, "Gi", "Keh" and Humming. My main issue resolved around the volume of my speaking, and this situation became worse when going out to loud places like Bars or Clubs. Hence, why I started doing these exercises and they surely helpd me mostly with cord closure.. But yesterday I discovered something new and wanted to ask you guys about it. I was on my way to a friend, 30 minutes drive, knowing that we were about to go to a loud bar. So I used these 30 minutes drive to warm up my voice for the apparent extensive use I was going to. And then after doing humming and lip rolls and Ya's and Gi's and more.. I kept feeling that my voice is still not "loud" enough, and still coming from the back of my throat mostly. Having recently heard about Twang exercises, the Mum exercises that are used by alot of voice teacher for vocal projection, and the use of the "EE" vowel to help with closure and brightness, I then remembered that I saw somewhere the "MEE MEE MEE" vocal exercise and decided to give it a try. So I started by Humming a song, and during the humming I opened my mouth for a "MEE" on some notes here and then so it looks like: mmmmmmMEEmmMEEmmMEEmmMEE.. I am not sure if when I did the MEE.. at first it was bright.. and then more twang like EE ... can't exactly remember it. Anyway after doing this for about 2 or 3 minutes, I tried to examine my speaking voice .. and all of the sudden I got a new sensation that I didn't have before: I felt that the voice was coming from the middle of my mouth - right above the tongue, and right below the hard palate. As if it was resonating from the mouth. It was strong, LOUD and powerful. It literally felt like I shifted the placement of where the voice was coming out of - instead of the back of the throat as used to be, to the middle of the mouth. I wanted to know.. is this MEE exercise realy the reason for it? is this what it's designed to do?