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aravindmadis
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I have always been envious of singers who have this magical "Once voice" quality in their singing.  I am sure that there are many excellent singers in this forum who have that quality.  I want to hear from you about your journey, how long it took and what is the one most important thing you would recommend to a rookie in this quest for holy grail!  

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    Limit the songs that you sing, limit the style that you sing, limit the notes that you use...........OR embrace all of the colors of your voice, express the songs that you sing the way you would express them, enjoy yourself while you are singing ............ Then you will have the ONE voice that only Aravindmadis has and all of the colors that go along with it............:headbang:

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    Seriously, Play with your voice find out what it can do, Do not limit to one sound. I do know what you are asking "the voice that sounds consistant throughout the range". But you need to play with your voice so you can find that unifying thread.

  I was playing around with high notes......... sliding or sirening from the top down, just trying to keep everthing together. I found an area that the sound just stopped, I stayed on that note moving my tongue back and forth up and down and raising and lowering my larynx until I found the position that the note would resonate.

  It was not that the vocal folds were not vibrating. it was that the space was wrong for sound to come from it. This stuff about modifying vowels and raising and lowering soft palate, larynx is about finding the right space for note to vibrate. My tongue ended up in a really odd position but that is what I need to do to maintain sound and sound color for those few notes.   Sometimes you have try new things.

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Can you describe the sensation of how you feel when note "resonates".. I am not quite sure I follow

For that particular note, NO SOUND came out just a rush of air and a hiss. I had to reposition everthing to get sound.

 In general you can make your voice sound,thin, thick,, solid, woofy, tinny, brassy, all of this has nothing to do with the the vibration at the vocal folds, it is all in how you are shaping the inside of your mouth and larynx position. Just like when you are working on Twang, You follow that sound and let that do the adjusting. You do not think about what shape your mouth takes on any thing.......Try different sounds, siren or change pitch keeping that new sound in mind and see what happens ....May be good may be bad.

   It is not what you feel when it resonates it is what you hear. Play with it........Sing a note and while holding it change back and forth from a brassy sound to a woofy sound or from One vowel to another .......... Lighter, darker.............. Play find what sounds and feels good to you.

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Ive heard you doing that on many recordings aaravin, so there isnt much more to it than what you already know I guess.

 

Perhaps this, its no so much about keeping positions the same, but changing them precisely so that you produce the quality you want as comfortably as you can.

If you dont produce the quality you are trying to do, it becomes insecure and you will lack precision, so it shows and wont sound nice .

If you are not comfortable when doing it, tonal quality will suffer. It may even get a specific thing towards what you want, like a bit more compressed, more "manly", more this or more that, but it wont sound nice.

Its aesthetic but we just cant break away from it. There is much more tradition and unsaid rules on pop culture than we realize at a first glance :).

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Ive heard you doing that on many recordings aaravin, so there isnt much more to it than what you already know I guess.

 

Perhaps this, its no so much about keeping positions the same, but changing them precisely so that you produce the quality you want as comfortably as you can.

If you dont produce the quality you are trying to do, it becomes insecure and you will lack precision, so it shows and wont sound nice .

If you are not comfortable when doing it, tonal quality will suffer. It may even get a specific thing towards what you want, like a bit more compressed, more "manly", more this or more that, but it wont sound nice.

Its aesthetic but we just cant break away from it. There is much more tradition and unsaid rules on pop culture than we realize at a first glance :).

Do you personally experience "one voice" Felipe?  Or to you are there many sensations of registration and transitions as you sing, say, a song in a generally difficult tessitura as C4 - C5?  I'm curious as to how many contemporary singers really have this unified vocal sensation, my best guess is it's not all that common.  Thanks in advance.

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Recommendation...

To feel and sing as though you have "one voice" you have to train your yourself mentally to percieve your voice as one voice first.  If you approach your singing from a bridging mentality, you will be in that frame of reference mentally and will always be seeking out, looking for, or assuming bridges when you sing.

To get one truly, well developed, unified voice from the bottom to the top and at any volume takes time and it will not happen without some sticking points and setbacks and frustration along the way.

What helped me the most was developing these key skillsets (but they remain works in progress):

1. Breathing and breath management

2. Laryngeal musculature workouts and conditioning exercises

3. A lot of experimentation with support levels, soft palate height, and resonance adjustments, maintaining openness in the vocal tract

4. Patience and acceptance 

Hope I've helped. 

 

 

 

 

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Do you personally experience "one voice" Felipe?  Or to you are there many sensations of registration and transitions as you sing, say, a song in a generally difficult tessitura as C4 - C5?  I'm curious as to how many contemporary singers really have this unified vocal sensation, my best guess is it's not all that common.  Thanks in advance.

I did train to have a "center" in which it sounds like the same from top to bottom, but even so there are important differences when registering both low and high range, and I can feel them changing as I sing, its kinda automatic but its there.

That area has also many ways to be approached, in special from E4 up to C5. So in my opinion, aiming for a "unity" will go against what you want to do, its very dynamic and its best kept so.

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I liked both Felipe's and Bob's responses. And MDEW is right, experiment.

My desire was to have one voice. Though, yes, we can make a range of sounds, and that is cool, too. But, to maybe paraphrase Felipe, one voice does not mean one rigid configuration from bottom to top. It means being flexible enough to let things adjust to maintain, for lack of a better description, a continuity.

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Pretend if you had to do a whole song without bridging into anything (pretend there is nothing to bridge to) what one important skillset would help you up and down the voice?  What would keep the voice from locking up?

All things being equal, support, along with how you shaped your throat (vowel) and the configuration(s) of your vocal tract. 

 

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I'm not as great as you guys,but from my personal experince.

Mentally one voice ideal does help me bridge through passagio F4~B4 with chest,

when I throught that there was a switch point to a head voice,I find out it's hard to get power to the sound around passagio area,

Remove that switch idea does do the job for me.

But after that,the idea of one voice doesnt do much for me,I just cann't power through the whole range with it.

My realistic approch is nothing special either try to match tones,or just make it sound less obvious,sometimes I not even care about that.

Again sorry for my pool english.

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I did train to have a "center" in which it sounds like the same from top to bottom, but even so there are important differences when registering both low and high range, and I can feel them changing as I sing, its kinda automatic but its there.

That area has also many ways to be approached, in special from E4 up to C5. So in my opinion, aiming for a "unity" will go against what you want to do, its very dynamic and its best kept so.

Thanks for the quick reply. :)  

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1. Breathing and breath management  - Understand this 

2. Laryngeal musculature workouts and conditioning exercises - Please elaborate. 

3. A lot of experimentation with support levels, soft palate height, and resonance adjustments, maintaining openness in the vocal tract - Think I know what you mean here

4. Patience and acceptance  - Fully agree and I am in sync, it has taken me nearly 2 years to even get to where I am and I know I have a long long way to go! 

Videohere, what specific exercises in Pillars help address point 2.  

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I'm guessing singers generally have a few options here:

1. Use a limited range and/or generally your chest voice, do it somewhat like you talk. This is a tried and true method, ALA Johnny Cash, but it is much more likely to be successful with a native first language speaker (folk singing, singing what you know). So unfortunately unless you choose to speak your first language and this could be unrealistic for people to connect to an Indian folk singer singing English songs.  

2. Experiment with your voice, explore the range while paying attention to each sound you find for cohesion. Explore various coordination to find out what it is efficient. However prioritize listening to the sound of various coordinations. Try to listen to it as if it is a stranger. And have strangers listen to you sing different songs without telling them it is you from song to song. Does it sound like the same guy on the low notes and high notes? Loud notes and quiet notes? Or does it sound like different characters are emerging?

3. Accept that you have different sounds you may wish to convey to articulate different emotions and embrace them. They may not be as cohesive. But there are famous singers (David Bowie for example) who are known for a wide variety of sounds and inflections to articulate different characters and emotions. Ziggy Stardust and the Thin White Duke are miles way in vocal styling, but it's still 'Bowie' and I still find him very iconic and expressive either way. You could even have certain combinations of vocal stylings define you. So people would recognize iconic diversity such as as the Buddy Holly hiccup, or the Michael Jackson falsetto hoo.

The further you diversify, the more you'd rely on your voiceprint. Voices have a bit of a vocal finger print that is unique to each singer. Your folds, resonating tract and so forth are designed in a unique way to you that no one can fully reproduce. I suppose it's a sliding scale how far you can diversify without sounding like a different vocalist or sounding like you are doing impersonations to the average person.

 

 

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Videohere, what specific exercises in Pillars help address point 2.  

I don't own pillars but there are many exercises that work and condition the voice.  Some are maintenance oriented and some are hardcore strengthening and conditioning.

Which ones do you want?  More importantly, which ones do you need?  What are your goals specifically?

 

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Videohere, what specific exercises in Pillars help address point 2.  

@aravindmadis

For starters, I feel compelled to inform you that Pillars 4.0 is out now... the new online interface which is really killer because it makes all the TVS ideas really cohesive and tie in together very nicely... plus, 45 new videos, demonstrations, training routines and the completed book. Part of the update includes a module completely dedicated to the onsets. Each onset has its own lesson, video, lecture, demonstration, tables, etc... so the depth of the onsets has really come to full maturity in this new system. Send me a private email and lets discuss how to get you in with some discount codes since you are an existing client. You really should get this update it is the most significant update ever on this program... shoot me a PM. 

To answer your question:

The new updated system identifies certain TVS training techniques and ideas as "resistance" training or "coordination/resonance" training. This is how I am further detailing the onsets, vowels and vowel modification formulas.

For the onsets there are four "resistance training" onsets and five "coordination & tuning" onsets.

In regards to the acoustics and vowels, there are "resistance training" vowel modification formulas and "resonance" vowel modification formulas to train. 

So...

1). If you want to do detail work, you do the coordination onsets and resonance vowel modification routines.

2). If you want to work on musculature strengthening, you will work on resistance onsets and resistance vowel modification routines.

To cut to the chase:

You should work the resistance training onsets: D&R, A&R, Q&R and C&R onsets.

You can further fortify your musculature work by training the neutral, "pingy" Ah vowel between the two onsets with sirens and other workouts in the program. I would also recommend forward resonant edging vowels as well. For example;

 

1). D&R + Eh < > Eh + D&R

2). D&R + Eh < > Eh + A&R * 

3). D&R + Ah < > Ah/Ou + A&R

4). Q&R onsets on individual notes into the head voice. Be sure that you work on larynx dampening when you do this, otherwise your missing out on a lot of the benefits of Q&R onsets into M2.

5). The Vinne Belt Set - This is another set of vocal workouts that are oriented towards belting sounds and configurations, which make you really strong.

 

All of these techniques build the strength of the CT ability to stretch the vocal folds as you go higher, while also maintaining the counter resistance of TA activation to give you more vocal fold mass so that you get that chesty sound.

The "trick" is... to train techniques that activate BOTH the CT and the TA in a sort of "tug-a-war" relationship... CT stretching the folds to increase pitch, while the TA countering that movement to maintain fold mass. The objective is to stretch the folds, but maintain vocal fold mass while you do it... then, you get your good belts. If you do this inside the TVS neutral vowel, "Ah" you can add additional larynx raising positions that will also build endurance.

If you take the time to learn the TVS Method ideas, in particular, the onsets and the acoustic modes (vowels) and you then work with the training tables to learn how to put the onsets together with the vowels... you will get the fastest gains possible. 4Pillars will get you there, if you take the time to learn the method and train it.

;)

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Rob is pretty much spot on in how you can train this. Let me try to explain the problem in short. Over most of our range the CT is dominant over the  TA by nature. Naturally most people have two different ways to increase pitch going from that:

1. Increase CT
2. Increase CT and TA at an equal rate

The problem is that going from the speaking voice both strategies ususally don't work during passagio. If you only increase CT, the CT will get extremely dominant early in pitch, which causes a too early transition into M2 (falsetto). At this early pitch the intensity levels between M1 and M2 differ too much and you will "yodel" without a smooth transition.

If you increase both at equal rate your total activation will just get too high. This is sometimes called "overshouting" during passaggio. At some point you will hit a "brick wall" where the CT is at 100% activation. At that point you can either back off the TA, which causes a yodel into falsetto again because the intensity will drop drastically or you will just break.

So what is the solution to that? There are two things that we have to do for a better coordination:

1. reduce the amount of CT dominance in the lowest part of the range
2. reduce the total amount of muscle activation

One of the most popular strategies is to pull your falsetto coordination down into the low range, but how does that work? Falsetto as a coordination has very little TA activity (lower than in the low speaking voice) but decent CT activity. If you go down in pitch from falsetto, this is done by just lowering the CT activity. Once you reach the lowest part of the voice you have a state with very little TA activity and little CT activity, thus lower total activation than in the speaking voice. If you go down very low you can even reach a level of almost equal activity between the two.

Going from that posture you will make a new onset on a "hold", "cry", which raises total activity a little but also activates support and allows you to use lung pressure a little more in pitch control, removing the neccessity to use so much muscle. The CT and TA are more balanced now and total activation is lower, which allows you to sing through the passaggio. In the G4 area there comes the second passaggio and it seem to be the case that at this point you have to increase TA further to stay on a "chesty" sound. This is really where the "strength building" of the TA comes in. The first passaggio and the pitch area up to F#4 is mostly a coordination thing between TA/CT, the G4+ area on a "chesty" phonation is a "vocal strength" thing.

At around A#4 most of us can release TA again because at this point we can get an intensity match between laryngeal mode M1 and laryngeal mode M2 and just make a registration. You still have the option to increase TA further and stay on a "chesty" M1 phonation if you have the required vocal strength.

Thus, the C4-F#4 area is really key in vocal coordination for most of us (goal: not overshouting here) and the G4-A#4 area is key in vocal strength for most of us (goal: stay in M1). The B4+ area is easier again unless you have the desire to sing in M1 up there. 

Regarding vowel shapes different strategies can help for different issues. Modifying to closed vowels during passaggio (= "Covering") can especially help those who have issues with "overshouting" because closed vowels have lower total muscle activation. Modifying to open vowels (the "bright/pingy AH") can help to strengthen the TA, especially in the G4-A#4 area, where it is needed. It can also help during passaggio if you have lots of yodeling issues, but it can easily lead to overshouting on the contrary.

Larynx Dampening (D&R onset) allows you to use more Bernoulli closure on the folds and more air pressure in pitch control which leaves more room for the muscles in pitch increase and avoids a break that is caused by the CT reaching maximum activation.

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Great post Benny.  Now if can just insert a factual "street" comment.

Aravindmadis,

Real life, as you train these areas of the voice or sing in these areas Benny mentioned before, it can very easily, very easily be thought of as straining, especially in the beginning and you want to back off or try to go around that "tug of war" feeling. Some will not agree with me, but if you learn to remove those fears of strain and support well, and work hard in those areas (sometimes while you strain and struggle a bit) you will find you will gain strength to both seal well and flex well in those areas.

The key is take the strain and move it (physically as well as mentally) down below!  

I am a firm believer in consistently and methodically applying stress to the voice in cases where you trying to strenghten and grow it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

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Singing takes effort, that's undeniable. And at a lot of times its necessary to go strong on training to achieve and understand certain coordinations, also undeniable.

However Bob, just stress is may be unproductive.

For example, someone could just go loud and open blasting it out all the way, everyday, in order to learn how to carry a chesty super powerful voice up. However, that does not tell the person much about the coordinations necessary to do so, it will be a kind of a blind search.

On the other hand, if first you do this on the middle of the range, in a comfortable pitch:

Learn how to produce a soft falsetto
Learn how to produce a piercing adducted falsetto
Learn how to produce a soft full voice
Learn how to produce a piercing adducted full voice

You can compare all this stuff and identify the different controls that produces these qualities. Once you can control this in a independent manner, its much easier to keep a full powerful voice and explore the more demanding pitch areas, or using different qualities. It will be less stressful and much less frustrating.

Thinking of just the aspect of control over mechanical registers and closure levels of course. There is more to it, but its an example.

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It's really important to learn to separate the "good" and the "bad" tensions in the voice. You need effort/tension to sing, but you also need relaxation. The important thing is where you need what and that differs a bit between coordinations. 

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Felipe, Benny, I totally, totally agree.  Felipe I'm on board with you.

All I'm saying is at times it can be very physically demanding.

That's with all your ducks in the water, everything going well, it's still demanding on the body depending on the song. 

I can list songs if you want that are just plain demanding. 

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