Jump to content

Laryngeal and Pharyngeal Activity During Semioccluded

Rate this topic


JackCee
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi guys, found an interesting article, I am not sure if I can post it here so I will post the link. The article has specific numbers on the improvement for patients who have hyperfunction dysphonia by using semi-occluded vocal phonations. A lot of great information on this forum and I feel I have to contribute also. Some importants things to note: all the patients had hyperfunction dsyphonia and none had hypofunctional dysphonia (can someone clarify the difference), all these results were in the short term and the long-term retention of these effects were not measured. Some technical questions I would like to know is how can we translate the information from these studies to speaking/singing and how can we have long-term retention instead of temporary improvement. 

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0892199713000982

1-s2.0-S0892199713000982-gr1.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

well simply put hyper is over use of laryngeal muscles and hypo is underuse..so hyper to much closure of vocal folds, hypo not enough or incomplete closure.

If you have this sort of dysfunction, its usually caused by the nerves signal to the muscle.  It can be caused by something as simple as a cold to something traumatic physically or mentally.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  The wierd thing about that is that the people with Hyper dysphonia just get worse and worse... The tighter the folds the more air you have to use to get them to phonate..... the more air the tighter the folds.......A setup for failure.... Getting them to relax is needed......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In addition to what Dan said,  Hyperfunction can also be about the flexing of the CT... Too heavy registration, often coincident with over-adduction.  Both are often present when the voice habitually has too much exhalation force.

THe Semi-occluded phonations change the ratio of prssures above/below the glottis, increasing the supra (above) glottal pressure. This has the same effect at the laryngeal level as reducing the exhalation force,

As an exercise, it helps the individual experience the sensations that the pressure change creates, and (technicaly) helps them negotiate a different set of muscle balances.

What the individual gets introduced to is the same effect as correct support, which in most hyperfunction cases, is to constrain the exhalation effort (or simply to not invoke it in the first place).

I hope this is helpful,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What the individual gets introduced to is the same effect as correct support, which in most hyperfunction cases, is to constrain the exhalation effort (or simply to not invoke it in the first place).

Cool, I was always under the impression that if you are able to sustain the "pressure state" of semi-occluded phonations in the vocal tract it will automatically trigger correct support as a kind of "natural reflex", at least if your support muscles don't have unneccessary tensions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cool, I was always under the impression that if you are able to sustain the "pressure state" of semi-occluded phonations in the vocal tract it will automatically trigger correct support as a kind of "natural reflex", at least if your support muscles don't have unneccessary tensions.

My personal experience of this (yep, I use it in practice) is to also learn the throat sensations of the lighter-mass phonation that is provoked, and then to maintain it while opening to the vowel.  If the transition is done too rapidly, I clunk back into the heavier registration...and can hear it and feel it.  The key for me was to open a low first-Formant vowel ( oo or ee) verrrrrry slooooowly.

I hope this is helpful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...