Jump to content

Training chest the voice

Rate this topic


nissenoo7
 Share

Recommended Posts

Yoyo!

 

I recently watched this seriously awesome video, by the forum member Jens. Great demonstration and clarification of registers, as well as some wise words on developing all the parts of the voice. I have noticed that several of the forum members that can sing and have proven so by posting videos of themselves singing, can take their full chest voice quite high (even as high as C5 as Jens said). It seems like having a flexible chest voice can be very beneficial, for example when singing sentences above your passagio, or when connecting back down to chest from head (or mix).

So my question is: How to train the chest voice to go up as high as B4, C5 etc?

I have previously made an attempt at stretching the chest with method 3, and I will try to post a demonstration tomorrow. 

To me, it seems like there are two or three main ways to go about it

1. Develop chest voice by singing where it is comfortable.

2. Develop chest voice by singing high chest voice lightly.

3. Develop chest voice by pulling back (no straining) and drag it up as far as possible.

 

Any thoughts on this subject? What have worked in your experiences?

Important here to clarify that the question is about developing the chest voice to reach higher notes, not development of the chest voice in its comfortable register. 

 

Video by Jens: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoknlqiaryo&index=13&list=LLSF6n64Wu9_EzUw8Ragt_Cg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Boy oh boy.  How many times have we heard this goal this year?...lol!!!

"I want a big powerful chest voice"....but are any of you wiling to tap the requisites to get there?

Before you even begin.....do you work on exercises for breathing, and breath management?

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

You have to understand the vowels, acoustics, build TA strength above the bridge and balance respiration.

The best way I know to do the is with specific onsets that engage the TA and other adductor muscles and then train the in and out of modified vowels, to include narrowed vowels and the neutral vowel "ah". 

Coincidentally, I just finished filming 5 "Integrated Training Routines" that are specifically designed for exactly that, belt training... will be in the new 4Pillars system in about 2 weeks.

Dan, I think for some people, a lighter mass with less TA engagement such as the chest/head blend you are referring to works for some people, but others really need to pull the TA "bulk" up higher... it just depends on the individual and fach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im not trying to say that I want to sing full chest when I am performing, but it seems like good singers are able to do so if they like. Maybe increased flexibility in the chest voice allows for more upper control like easier light chest engagement when in the head voice. Thats why it might be interesting to actually develop a quite flexible chest voice, of course without disregarding the training the other aspects of the voice.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Robert Lunte said:

You have to understand the vowels, acoustics, build TA strength above the bridge and balance respiration.

The best way I know to do the is with specific onsets that engage the TA and other adductor muscles and then train the in and out of modified vowels, to include narrowed vowels and the neutral vowel "ah". 

Coincidentally, I just finished filming 5 "Integrated Training Routines" that are specifically designed for exactly that, belt training... will be in the new 4Pillars system in about 2 weeks.

Dan, I think for some people, a lighter mass with less TA engagement such as the chest/head blend you are referring to works for some people, but others really need to pull the TA "bulk" up higher... it just depends on the individual and fach.

When you say TA strength, do you mean chest voice muscle strength? 

I actually started to get some quite nice belting tones, especially for the AH, and the other vowels are getting better. However, i find it very hard to say something else up there other than those vowels, so it is not really that effecting if there are words and sentences above E4. Hehe :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

    Robert and Daniel are the experts ........ I am in the same boat that you are. Having said that ........ For myself with Daniels lighter approach my tone at the moment is kind of shrill ....... With Roberts heavier "Belting" exercises my tone is Heavier but sometimes I do not get a "Complete" solid tone like he does. Mine is more like a huskey whisper yet louder than speaking volume.

    With each approach,Daniel or Roberts,  some people will find balance from the beginning. I was not so lucky. But the good news is that BOTH really are Full voice. Once I realised that the progress began. Both my shrill light sound and husky woofy sound is from an imbalance in resonance and improper larynx position. What I have been doing to improve this is, While holding the note, switch from one to the other,light shrill to loud and husky(messa de voce). Trying different vowels, mouth and tongue positions.

   It takes a while to straighten out years of imbalance but once you find a vowel and "Throat shape" that works, work from that vowel and open or close to the troublesome vowels.

   If you do not have Roberts Program ........... Save yourself years of experiments and Buy it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As Daniel said you usually don't want to bring "raw chest" past the E4 area for efficiency reasons. For training/strengthening you can do it though. However, you should be able to support correctly before you try to do that. It is not a coordination that you will want to use in actual singing a lot (maybe for 1 or 2 notes a gig to "show off").

If you have the TVS program, go for the thing called "Dampen & Release" onset. The Dampening is the important point here. It prevents the twang from kicking in heavily, which means your vocal folds are more apart. Then you bring them back together by a "push" from the support muscles. 

So here is how I do it:

- start on a hooty OO vowel in your falsetto range and slide it down into your comfortable chest range
- this will give you a breathy OO in your chest range
- keep the same placement but now add a "push" to that, which makes you go like "Ugh" "Ugh", similar to an ape or a caveman
- it should give you a sensation in the pharynx that some describe as something "fleshy" coming together. Imagine that to be the thick part of the folds
- Train this "damepend push" for a while on that "UGH" vowel, you don't sing the G by the way, it just illustrates the sound
- Then you want to change the vowel from OO to EH while still keeping the sensation of the dampened push, don't make the sound bright, it has to be dampened
- Now train that on higher pitches too. It is very recommended to always start on the OO, which helps you to keep the sound dampened and don't make it bright

 

I know that some people say that bright sounds will strengthen your chest muscles, which I think is not true. Bright sounds will strengthen your twang and therefore strengthens the metallic sound of your voice, which is mainly caused by the twang and not by the "chest muscles".

The coordination I describe here WILL be very demanding on support in the higher range and will not feel like "comfortable singing". For comfortable singing you NEED the stronger twang and you need a brighter sound, but as a strengthening excercise dampening works great.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...