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SO confused about my voice type??? Help!

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loljoe
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Hi everyone!

I'm a 20 y/o guy who has always had passion for singing. I've never taken lessons myself as I can't afford them, but I have trained with Singing Success for about two years, and have recently started Ken Tamplin's Vocal Academy (with HUGE improvements!)

I know it's not really that important, but I would like to find out my voice type. The problem is, my voice feels kinda weird and I'm really not sure where I fit.

From birth, I have had a very easily accessible head voice going up to F5 on a normal day (NOT in falsetto), and a chest voice going down to G2 (The sound is full and rich here, and I can go lower with a vocal fry). I'm not 100% sure where I start mixing, approx. around E4. My voice is mix sounds light and agile, and I lose almost all of the weight from the lower part of my register. I'm very well connected, so I find it kinda difficult to pinpoint exactly where I transition into head. Right now, I can hit a C5 in a very heady mix (which I think is pretty good seeing as I've never had professional lessons hehe). My normal speaking voice is in the lower third octave so I can VERY comfortably sing in this range, but I can comfortably vocalise throughout my current range freely without any stress (no strain, keeping a neutral larynx, open throat, etc.) I wouldn't say my voice has any sort of booming depth, but it is quite warm (getting lighter as I ascend higher in chest), and somewhat agile, and some tendency of sounding nasal (not exactly NASAL, but I can't think of the proper word right now). So basically, my range form chest to head is G2-F5.

I know it's asking a lot, but could anyone hazard a guess of where I could fit in? I would really like to see a vocal teacher, but right now I'm short of money, so it would be greatly appreciated if you guys could give me some advice until I do :)

Thanks!

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You have a voice that goes from G2 to F5, as far as total range of sound.

Actually, any voice coach is probably going to have to hear you for a while one a few different songs and then, maybe try some exercises for you before they could really type your voice. And typing your voice is not necessary unless you are going to sing opera. Are you going to sing opera? If not, don't worry about it. Train your voice for the type of songs you want to sing.

 

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Outside of classical voice type isn't really important as any average guy voice can be trained to make hundreds of different sounds both high and low.  In my experience, usually, the difference between a "tenor" and "baritone" is one guy got told his voice was low and he couldn't sing high and another found high notes naturally.  

Please post a clip by the way, you could be the most eloquent writer of all time and we still will have no clue what your voice type is just by words alone. :) 

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6 hours ago, loljoe said:

 

Vocal type does not matter in contemporary singing.  But a usual guide to identify your type is to find our what singer you relate to the most.  Most likely you will be in the same Fach as the singer you have as a point of reference.  Usually you will 1. Be able to sing that specific singer's songs with ease while others struggle 2.  You will be able to improvise easily  

Subconsciously, we relate to singers and singing style that complements our voice, especially in untrained singers.  

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Do you feel more comfortable singing any of the songs below? Try to sing them like them, not just one note but the whole song.

 

 

 

Michael Bublè is Baritone. Marc Anthony is Tenor. I've chosen songs with a lot of text.

I think knowing your most comfortable range for singing (tessitura) is important. And it is clear we all want to know it.

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5 hours ago, Rosa said:

Do you feel more comfortable singing any of the songs below? Try to sing them like them, not just one note but the whole song.

 

 

 

Michael Bublè is Baritone. Marc Anthony is Tenor. I've chosen songs with a lot of text.

I think knowing your most comfortable range for singing (tessitura) is important. And it is clear we all want to know it.

I can sing both comfortably. But, my most comfortable singing range is a little lower than Anthony, where tone is concerned. Actually, I feel like my tessitura is BETWEEN these two singers ranges? Like a little higher than Buble's, but a little lower than Anthonys... (this is where my confusion comes from lol)

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   Fauch is in the sound not the range. The range part is whether you are loud and powerful in that range but the Sound still matters more. Ex. Neil Diamond vs James Taylor.They both can sing a powerful G2 the difference is that Neil Diamond will shake the floor with the lower overtones and James Taylor will cut throught the room with high overtones.

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3 hours ago, MDEW said:

   Fauch is in the sound not the range.

I definitely agree with this.  Except maybe for very low notes, it is true that extraordinarily low voices will be able to get down much lower with ease than say, a uniquely high one.  I know some guys who start straining at D3 and others who are just warming up at F2.  Seems the low range is more fixed than high in my amateur opinion.  

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Basically, simplifying hugely, a fach is used to determine if a singer can handle role comfortably and reliably a number of nights a week for a number of weeks for a show in opera. For example, the casting director has a devil character and decides to cast a light tenor. So, he needs a guy that can sing the tenor range with a light or bright sound and do that three nights a week for an 8 week engagement. A guy that has the sound and range he is looking for is a "light tenor" for the run of that show.

And might very well get cast as a helden tenor in the next show.

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