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Vocal stamina and unconfortable environment for your voice ?

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GuitarLord
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Hey there,

before asking my questions I want to point out few things:

- I eat very well. I have very good "singers diet" (I guess it can be called like that). I don't eat almost any sugar, fast food, fat etc... don't smoke... don't drink alcohol pretty often... no coke or similar drinks... I eat pretty much healthy food, lots of vegetables, fruits etc... lots of water... So I guess my nutrition for vocal health is the best possible that it can be.

- I avoid losing my voice through singing. Whenever it hurts of it feels uncomfortable I stop.

- I exercise (fitness)

- I do everything possible to keep my voice in best shape!

Now, after saying that... all this helped me get some stamina or singing endurance, call it what you like :)

But still, I have this big problem that I lose my voice very fast in unhealthy environment...

For example, I was practicing few new songs last month, they were pretty demanding to sing, but I learned them pretty good... For last few weeks I sang them great! And yesterday, there was some acoustic show of my friends where I was to sing a couple of songs and play on guitar in between their two sets as a guest. I was so happy that I will sing my new learned songs.

But then, when I arrived to the gig, the environment was so uncomfortable to my voice... It was full of cigarette smoke, the music was pretty loud so when I had to talk with some friends I had to talk a bit louder then normally, and I just drank one beer (with a lot of water after it) but I guess it also had effect on my vocals.

So basically I was there only 1 hour before I was to sing but my voice was pretty wasted by then, and I chose to sing some easier songs because my throat was not the healthiest at the time. I still sang those songs pretty good and was very well accepted by audience, they all told me I stole the show (I'm not so full of my self every day, it's only sometimes hehe) but I am now pretty unhappy that I trashed my voice in only one hour through passive smoking, drinking one beer, talking over loud music... but usually those are things you can't skip if you go to friend's gig...

So basically question is: anyone has any tips on how to do it? protecting your voice from "passive" (or should I say un-intentional) abuse... How do you do it when you go to a loud party where you are about to sing a bit later on? What can we do to prevent ourselves from loosing our voice there...

;)

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So basically question is: anyone has any tips on how to do it? protecting your voice from "passive" (or should I say un-intentional) abuse... How do you do it when you go to a loud party where you are about to sing a bit later on? What can we do to prevent ourselves from loosing our voice there...

GuitarLord: Of all the things you mention, by far the most wearing on the voice is the loud talking. I will address that, since you can control it.

You've probably heard the axiom, 'sing like you talk'. Well, in this scenario, I recommend the opposite... 'talk like you sing'. :) Support your speaking voice, use twang, etc, and don't speak any louder than you would sing in the same range. The twang, especially, boosts the audibility and clarity of your voice significantly without adding vocal effort.

This kind of speech takes a little practice, but a few hours attention in your studio (read poetry, or lyrics to songs out loud) will go a long way to helping you prep.

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Gum or lozenges for the voice. Chew one at all times. Black licorice and tons of water - at all times.

Tell people who smoke not to blow it in your face - use a gesture - don't shout it.

If you MUST speak, do so in peoples ears only in conversational level, if they can't hear you, write it.

You sound like sbd who takes their vocal health seriously and so do I. Don't let anything interfere -

don't expect anybody to understand - do what you have to do by yourself, for yourself.

Warm up before and warm down (especially this) after the show. Make sure you can perform your show in its entirety

long before your gig - that way you will know you are able to pull through.

All of the above have helped me go 1 1/2-2 hour sets with little or no impact on my voice.

Kind Regards,

Thanos

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