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How to determine where head voice ends?

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em667

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Hello! I am 21 year old guy, completely new to singing,(a decent guitar player) and i have tried to measure my vocal range for few days now. My problem, probably a good thing actually, my voice doesn't ever break when i slide a note up. My lowest note is C2 but as i go up i don't notice a point where something would change, it just goes higher and thinner. My voice ends around F6 where it becomes the worst, squeezed, barely sustained falsetto you would have ever heard. Is there any way to measure where head voice ends and where i enter falsetto.

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You could do chromatic scales starting around D4, let's say 5 semitones, and progressively ascend in pitch one semitone at a time, going strong/loud. When you start to get near G4,A4,B4, notice where your voice starts to lose tonal quality and change character.

Normally on males, B4 or C5.

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5 hours ago, em667 said:

Hello! I am 21 year old guy, completely new to singing,(a decent guitar player) and i have tried to measure my vocal range for few days now. My problem, probably a good thing actually, my voice doesn't ever break when i slide a note up. My lowest note is C2 but as i go up i don't notice a point where something would change, it just goes higher and thinner. My voice ends around F6 where it becomes the worst, squeezed, barely sustained falsetto you would have ever heard. Is there any way to measure where head voice ends and where i enter falsetto.

If you do not notice a break and can sing to F6 and still sound good.............. DO NOT LOOK FOR THAT BREAK............. You already achieved the goal of most of us.

If you are doing a fast slide, that is why you are not hearing the shift(unless of course there is none..... in that case STOP looking before you screw something up). Singing a S L O W siren will tell if there is a shift or not................. Still.  Do not mess something up that is working for you.

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7 hours ago, em667 said:

Hello! I am 21 year old guy, completely new to singing,(a decent guitar player) and i have tried to measure my vocal range for few days now. My problem, probably a good thing actually, my voice doesn't ever break when i slide a note up. My lowest note is C2 but as i go up i don't notice a point where something would change, it just goes higher and thinner. My voice ends around F6 where it becomes the worst, squeezed, barely sustained falsetto you would have ever heard. Is there any way to measure where head voice ends and where i enter falsetto.

 

im reading between the lines here. knowing that ones voice generally gets deeper as they age. 21 is pretty young. I got socks older than 21. How would you generally describe your voice?

Im just reading between the lines and guessing that the general quality of it is already pretty light to start with, correct?

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18 hours ago, Felipe Carvalho said:

You could do chromatic scales starting around D4, let's say 5 semitones, and progressively ascend in pitch one semitone at a time, going strong/loud. When you start to get near G4,A4,B4, notice where your voice starts to lose tonal quality and change character.

Normally on males, B4 or C5.

Thanks for the advice. I went very loud this time. Previously i didn't go too strong. Before i was actually entering falsetto early at B3 am sure. This time i went loud and with some practice i got to G4 it was very difficult and strained, it's was last sustained note then my voice broke in attempt to go higher in head voice. I tried to push it in various ways ,but sometimes i entered falsetto even earlier,  I also noticed that i can falsetto very low, bottoming at D3. Great i got my statistics down, now i can track possible improvements from learning and practicing.

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Thanks for the follow up, it makes sense.

Now the catch here is this: you can still figure out how to stay in your strong voice and continue higher without needing to be so loud and without straining. Once you do, then within that "extension", you do the same procedure I said before, and mark down the spot where your tonal quality begins changing (it will be a gradual shift, not a sudden change as you are experiencing now), and that is what we usually mark as the end of the tessitura (still, as you noticed before, in terms of range you will still have a lot of margin above it).

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12 hours ago, JonJon said:

 

im reading between the lines here. knowing that ones voice generally gets deeper as they age. 21 is pretty young. I got socks older than 21. How would you generally describe your voice?

Im just reading between the lines and guessing that the general quality of it is already pretty light to start with, correct?

As far as low notes go D2 is the last one to produce strong bass tones, C#2,C2 are not too impressive. All up to C4 sounds alright. There is a noticeable point in my falsetto at D#5 where it loses some of it's tone and my voice almost breaks ,as if it entered some post-falsetto register, but D#5 is too low for whistle isn't it, probably just bad technique:) Prior that point it sounds good. I have got no idea who i sound like. I can do good Jim Morrison impressions when he's not screaming.

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No! easy, man. D#5 is a complicated area too, I have another passaggio on the D#5-E5 area, so nothing to worry about. I'm learning how to navigate it well and get to a solid F5. Just practice and practice, take it easy :) You are just starting out.

You sound like you have a slightly lowered centered voice. Lower than mine at least. I'd recommend working on your chest voice so you have more stability and coordination ( so you are able to shed unnecesary tensions ) before going into G#4+ area. Don't neglect falsetto though, always work from A4 and up too, you seem to have great flexibility if you can get to an F6, even a G5 is awesome, so don't lose that falsetto strength and range.

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