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My highest note has been F# for 4 years? (And falsetto decrease)

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RiaJuuuuu10

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I haven't been here for a while, so hi.

I've wanted to take lessons for a long time, but I haven't really gotten the chance. Instead, I've just been singing my own stuff or covers, and my voice has gotten a lot better (I've gotten quite a few compliments on it). I've developed kind of a belting/baritone voice, I think (kind of like Max Bemis from Say Anything, if you guys are familiar with him). I don't think it's been hurting my vocals, as I don't ever feel sore after doing it (and it's actually the most comfortable way I can hit my highest notes). But I'm still a little worried considering my falsetto range has gone from a comfortable B4 to an A4 that I have to force out (over the past 3 years). I only just turned 23, so I'm assuming it's natural, or maybe I really am damaging my voice. I really do plan to have a vocal coach soon, but is losing your falsetto around this age normal (especially if you weren't really using it much)?

Then the normal range thing. My F#4 is much better than it used to be, but it's still hard to hit on some songs. Like I said, I haven't been taking lessons, and I haven't really been doing range exercises either, but I expected to be able to hit at least a G4 by now. Does this mean that F#4 is most likely my peak, or do range exercises make a world of a difference? My goal is to eventually hit an A4 in chest voice, but I'm kind of demotivated at the moment. If I do start taking lessons and doing the normal range exercises as much as possible, how fast will I likely be able to hit a G4? (If it's even possible, or if knowing is even possible)

 

Thanks in advance

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Can I be blunt?

You said...

"I haven't been taking lessons, and I haven't really been doing range exercises either." 

"I'm kind of demotivated at the moment."

"How fast will I likely be able to hit a G4?"

"I have to force out (over the past 3 years)"

The above is a prescription for failure.  Get a teacher or get a program.

 

 

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Well the main glaring issue I'm seeing here is your falsetto range. You should be able to bring falsetto up past B4 regardless of your coordination. The two main issues would be not achieving full ct tilt and oversupporting to compensate, in which case you wouldn't have falsetto, and the other being general mouth tension inhibiting/preventing falsetto. But in both cases, technique correction should provide a falsetto up to E5 at least. So, there's something wrong here. Everything else about your chest voice sounds normal. Also around your age it's normal to have laryngeal lengthening, however that should actually help your range/technique, instead of inhibit it. As someone who pushed a lot, your chest range sounds normal, but the whole falsetto deal seems jacked up.

And to address your goals, with how you currently are, A4 seems wholey unrealistic. I honestly wouldn't push anything above the F#4.

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If you love it, sing everyday man.  Sing with energy and motivation and vocalize in a place where you can let your voice be free and as loud as it needs to be.  Start in a comfortable range and warmup every single day, work with a single pure vowel like "Ah", "Oh", or "Uh" and gradually work that top chest range until it gets more and more relaxed.

 Do this in combination with falsetto warmups/vocalizations as well everyday and you should gradually build the foundation you need to start approaching higher ranges more efficiently.  

Seriously though, don't neglect that falsetto, get it strong and quasi-operatic.  In my experience if falsetto starts fizzing out on me it's usually from neglecting it.  Even if you can only get a weak A4 in falsetto, still try and work with it! 

Don't sing falsetto for 30 minutes straight or anything but work it everyday with no shame and you should notice it getting stronger and stronger. This will in turn help your chest range to be more flexible. Also, you should seriously consider a vocal program if you have the money so you can optimize your practice + take out the guess work.

The founder of this site Robert Lunte's Four Pillars is highly recommended and there are also a few commendable vocal teachers here that can do skype lessons with you as well. Cheers and good luck. :) 

 

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On June 23, 2016 at 4:01 AM, terowyn said:

I haven't been here for a while, so hi.

I've wanted to take lessons for a long time, but I haven't really gotten the chance. Instead, I've just been singing my own stuff or covers, and my voice has gotten a lot better (I've gotten quite a few compliments on it). I've developed kind of a belting/baritone voice, I think (kind of like Max Bemis from Say Anything, if you guys are familiar with him). I don't think it's been hurting my vocals, as I don't ever feel sore after doing it (and it's actually the most comfortable way I can hit my highest notes). But I'm still a little worried considering my falsetto range has gone from a comfortable B4 to an A4 that I have to force out (over the past 3 years). I only just turned 23, so I'm assuming it's natural, or maybe I really am damaging my voice. I really do plan to have a vocal coach soon, but is losing your falsetto around this age normal (especially if you weren't really using it much)?

Then the normal range thing. My F#4 is much better than it used to be, but it's still hard to hit on some songs. Like I said, I haven't been taking lessons, and I haven't really been doing range exercises either, but I expected to be able to hit at least a G4 by now. Does this mean that F#4 is most likely my peak, or do range exercises make a world of a difference? My goal is to eventually hit an A4 in chest voice, but I'm kind of demotivated at the moment. If I do start taking lessons and doing the normal range exercises as much as possible, how fast will I likely be able to hit a G4? (If it's even possible, or if knowing is even possible)

 

Thanks in advance

Hey man, I've played and sung in Bands for over 15 years (as a hobby). As I didn't know anything about vocal techniques, I would yell as much as I could in order to sing the high notes. On top of that, I would drink a cold one (s) during performance, and talk loud afterwards. On the next day my voice would be broken, and I would be hoarse. My highest note at that time would be a F4#-G4 yelled from the top of my lungs. But those notes would be available to me only until the middle of the set. My point is, if you have not being taking lessons, not doing exercises (not only for range expansion), not following a decent vocal program, it does not matter how long you have been singing regarding your vocal improvements. I think you are losing your higher range because of vocal abuse and lack of training.

I think many people here will give you the same type of advices: get a coach, get a good vocal program, commit to training, do exercises, and sing your heart out. The 1st and 2nd  advices will get you where you want to be way faster and safer than searching on the web for free videos and tips, and just doing exercises on your own. 

How fast you will get the results you want (e.g. sing a G4) will depend of many things, as you probably have already guessed: time to repair your vocal (if needed); time to learn new coordinations; time to build muscle memory and strength; time it takes you to translate that into singing, etc.

If singing is what moves you, I suggest you to get a vocal program, maybe a coach for a few lessons, and commit to your training. I can assure you that it will paid off in the end, and you will be amazed with the results.

Cheers

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3 hours ago, Gneetapp said:

Hey man, I've played and sung in Bands for over 15 years (as a hobby). As I didn't know anything about vocal techniques, I would yell as much as I could in order to sing the high notes. On top of that, I would drink a cold one (s) during performance, and talk loud afterwards. On the next day my voice would be broken, and I would be hoarse. My highest note at that time would be a F4#-G4 yelled from the top of my lungs. But those notes would be available to me only until the middle of the set. My point is, if you have not being taking lessons, not doing exercises (not only for range expansion), not following a decent vocal program, it does not matter how long you have been singing regarding your vocal improvements. I think you are losing your higher range because of vocal abuse and lack of training.

I think many people here will give you the same type of advices: get a coach, get a good vocal program, commit to training, do exercises, and sing your heart out. The 1st and 2nd  advices will get you where you want to be way faster and safer than searching on the web for free videos and tips, and just doing exercises on your own. 

How fast you will get the results you want (e.g. sing a G4) will depend of many things, as you probably have already guessed: time to repair your vocal (if needed); time to learn new coordinations; time to build muscle memory and strength; time it takes you to translate that into singing, etc.

If singing is what moves you, I suggest you to get a vocal program, maybe a coach for a few lessons, and commit to your training. I can assure you that it will paid off in the end, and you will be amazed with the results.

Cheers

An awesome reply.

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Thanks for the replies everyone. I kind of expected the vocal coaching lecture, my problem at the moment is money. I do plan to have a vocal coach within the next month though.

I actually played around with my falsetto, and realized that the problem was technique (I guess my muscle memory for accessing falsetto is terrible). It turns out that I can hit a C5 in falsetto, but it sounds terrible (mickey mouse-esque sound). So I guess my falsetto range has slightly gone up, it's just weird trying to hit it (I'll accidentally sing from my throat 1-2 times before actually doing it right). I've never been able to hit an E5 though, so does the fact that I can still hit the C5 make this sound normal?

Also, I do have to belt to hit F4/F#4. I never really feel like I'm straining my voice by doing so, and I've been noticing improvements in tone from the past month alone, but is there a chance that despite this, I'm still doing harm to my vocal cords?

One concern is vocal nodules. I did abuse my voice for years (when I was 18, my voice was hoarse for a week, but this went away and I stopped singing for over a year for other reasons). Someone on reddit told me that if I had vocal nodules, I'd know and that there would be a missing part of my register, but is this always the case? They also said that since I'm young, my voice should be more resilient to damage (I've never heard this elsewhere). I really do want to learn everything correctly, I'm just broke and impatient, and I think I'll halt the whole process until I do find a coach, or at least sing in a more comfortable range. 

Two other quick questions though. Does it sound like I've even found my head/mixed voice yet, or is that most likely still "unlocked" for me? I've tried to follow YouTube videos to use my head voice, but it just doesn't work no matter how many times I try. I've also read in some places that using your falsetto is what eventually unlocks your head voice. And then the other question, when I DO find a vocal coach, is it possible that I can unlock where I am in falsetto in my full voice within a year? If not, what's the likely amount of time it will take (or at least an estimate)? I know this is a lot I'm asking, but I honestly want to be able to sing my own music I've written, and I need to at least hit an A4 to do it. I've also been told here that you can eventually get your chest voice/full voice to where your falsetto, but it just takes time and work. I'm willing to put in the work, I'm just curious as to how much time it could possibly take.

Thanks a lot guys, your responses were all great :)

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The best way to hit an A4 without putting in the work is to hit it lightly with a "woh" sound, and keep working on that light sound. If you're willing to put in 100% now (or however much you've done before), you can expect to put in 10 times that when you're done. Really, don't go for a full belt. The difference between a natural A4 and a perfect A4 is immeasurable; in fact the vocal cords will have to change major phonation patterns two times before they get there.

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I keep referring people back to this post. Watch the video. Also search for Roberts Video "Stop HITTING high notes" . Do not worry at this point if you end up with a Falsetto sound. The important thing is the shift to this coordination. If you do end up with a falsetto sound it should have a "Fatter" or "Darker" resonance than the normal thin sounding falsetto. Adding cord closure will give the "Buzzing" of a chesty sound.

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