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What Is It About A Voice That Gives People Chills?

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this one probably gave me chills when I first heard it and I still love it. One of my fave singers. IMO best combo lead singer/lead guitar player EVER.

The way he unexpectedly jumped way up to the high note on the word "still" at 2:50 with a lot of emotion...wow. Killer artist

 

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1 hour ago, JonJon said:

this one probably gave me chills when I first heard it and I still love it. One of my fave singers. IMO best combo lead singer/lead guitar player EVER.

The way he unexpectedly jumped way up to the high note on the word "still" at 2:50 with a lot of emotion...wow. Killer artist

 

     I think this has been one of my downfalls, perhaps the same kind of situation of other singers. I have not been exposed to voices like this. I am from the era and geographical area of things like Steppenwolf, 3 dog night, REO speedwagon, Air Supply, Bob Seger, Southern Rock like Skynyrd, Molly Hatchet Some of Ozzie maybe, A Few Kiss Tunes. Of course there were Motown singers also, Smokey Robinson, Jackie Wilson.............. In that type of background, The type of singing above just sounds wrong and not too pleasant. Don't get me wrong. I am not saying that it is not good, Perhaps even awesome, It is just different and even more different that Pavarotti to untrained ears.

       The point I am trying to make is that some of the aspects that are needed for any kind of singing are more apparent here. Compression, dampening of the larynx, support, A more focused sound perhaps?  The singers and type of songs/style that I mentioned seem to sound more on the singy/talky spectrum than the controlled/shouty mix of classical and yelling type of thing.

This is one that gets me moving The type of song that made me want to sing.  Nothing really fancy. No darkness to the voice or Vibrato(very little if any). You cannot hear the compression in this nor the twang or dampening of larynx.......... You know, the type of thing that helps keep the singing voice together........... Kind of explains how I could miss that those things are needed in singing, If only a touch, to keep the folds together and the tone steady.

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1 hour ago, MDEW said:

     I think this has been one of my downfalls, perhaps the same kind of situation of other singers. I have not been exposed to voices like this. I am from the era and geographical area of things like Steppenwolf, 3 dog night, REO speedwagon, Air Supply, Bob Seger, Southern Rock like Skynyrd, Molly Hatchet Some of Ozzie maybe, A Few Kiss Tunes. Of course there were Motown singers also, Smokey Robinson, Jackie Wilson.............. In that type of background, The type of singing above just sounds wrong and not too pleasant. Don't get me wrong. I am not saying that it is not good, Perhaps even awesome, It is just different and even more different that Pavarotti to untrained ears.

       The point I am trying to make is that some of the aspects that are needed for any kind of singing are more apparent here. Compression, dampening of the larynx, support, A more focused sound perhaps?  The singers and type of songs/style that I mentioned seem to sound more on the singy/talky spectrum than the controlled/shouty mix of classical and yelling type of thing.

This is one that gets me moving The type of song that made me want to sing.  Nothing really fancy. No darkness to the voice or Vibrato(very little if any). You cannot hear the compression in this nor the twang or dampening of larynx.......... You know, the type of thing that helps keep the singing voice together........... Kind of explains how I could miss that those things are needed in singing, If only a touch, to keep the folds together and the tone steady.

If that sounds "wrong" and "unpleasant", then I bet you hate Robert Plant, correct? And Ian Gillian? Maybe you think a man should sing like a man? Maybe like Bruce Springsteen and Bob Dylan? You probably hate a lot of Motown singers too then, since they showed a lot of range and versatility. I bet Darryl Hall hurts your ears too.

When and where you were born doesnt make a lot of difference nowadays since everything you could ever want to hear is at your fingertips. Though of course one has a fondness for music that they encountered in their youth. I gradded Hs in '85 which was pretty much VanHalens primetime. So VH or anything from that "family" falls very easily on my ears. Motley Crue, Ratt, Badlands, Salty Dog, Tora Tora, BulletBoys....pretty much any of the mid to late 80s "glam metal" stuff

So I sort of missed out on Kiss, The Beatles, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Led Zep. As a young kid in the early 70s, Zep and Sabbath would have been too dark for my ears and besides, my mom would never allow it in the house hehe. And stuff like Dylan/Grateful Dead??? I simply dont know how anyone can listen to it lol. Of course as I got older I did go back and rediscover Led Zep and they are among my faves. Also of course I like the Zep spinoffs....Whitesnake, Kingdome Come, Badlands, Blue Murder, Great White. That heavy blues rock vibe with good strong drumming and generally a high voiced singer is just a classic formula.

 

For me personally, Grand Funk was a very mediocre band. A mediocre band doing a cover?? uhmm, okay. Any band that has covers as their most famous songs is pretty weak IMO. I rank them about even with Kiss...nothing much musical really happening. (though Paul Stanley did eventually build his voice into an impressive instrument)

 

Im not trying to put you down, because I like you, but if Mark Farner is your inspiration, you are aiming pretty low lol. There were many singers from that era that obliterated Mark.

Why would you even need lessons and all that study to just sing like Mark Farner? What am I missing?

 

Here ya go, Motown covered by "one of them screamer singers". You can be quick to judge people by their hair and the era they came up in.....just as they can judge you, but in the end this is simply great, soulful singing showing a versatility that most of those guys you list couldnt touch. I mean, you train T4P? T4P is largely about the more advanced coordinations guys like Marq Torien use. Its funny, I didnt think about it when I thought to post that vid, but the first thing caught my eye when I saw one of Robs vids was that he did a scream that reminded me of Marq Torien lol.

 

 

Again, this one has always given me chills. Why, cuz he sang some pentatonic melody in chest voice? uhmm, no....cuz he walis out some nice high stuff with plenty of soul (they are from Memphis).  check 3:04 and 3:18.  Some similarities to Steve Perry IMO

 

one from 1994 but I only recently found it. Oni Logan singing, who was more known for singing in George Lynch's "Lynch Mob". This guy isnt really a high pitched screamer, he is more of a soulful 70s vibe. He doesnt give me chills per se but I do think he'd be a good model for me in a certain sense as he is demonstrating how to sing in a good soulful, lower registered vibe in a rock context. He is obviously very NONmechanical....I bet he cant sing it the same way twice

 

 

Dont aim too low brother, you might hit your target

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     You've taken my meaning the wrong way. I was undersinging.........My point was that the singers that came on the radio did not sound as if the were compressing and dampening the larynx or using Twang. I was trying all that stuff with High larynx and no compression with a straight tone.

       Robert Plant, Steve Tyler, Even Paul Stanley(at the time) had a sound that suggested Falsetto. Even in your post you mentioned Sabbath being too dark for you at that time. Right out of high school I was playing in a country rock band. Getting home at 3 in the morning and if I heard other songs it was stuff we were practicing.

       It seemed that people started liking things like Guns and Roses or AC/DC. Axl sounded like a cartoon character and so did Brian Johnson.  How can someone in my line of work at the time think that the sound of Axl Rose is a proper sound for singing? I could sing like that. It did not have the correct sound  for Seger, Blackfoot, Skynyrd or any other of the songs that I would sing. So therefore I did not pick up on TWANG to Help keep folds together, dampen larynx to keep the Larynx from jumping.

       My point was about how singers get their impressions of singing and their ideas of what good singing is.  It was not putting down what YOU like to listen to or what you feel is good singing.. It was more about how others may have different tastes and why things like Compression, Twang and major support may not be instinctive given the artists they were exposed to.

     And YES, Bob Seger, Bruce Springsteen, Paul Rodgers, Molly Hatchet, Steppenwolf, Greg Allman and Grand Funk RailRoad was and still is my personal ideal of a sound for singing Rock. So what? it is just an opinion. Not right or wrong, Just an opinion like some prefer Pavarotti over Caruso. No big deal and no challenge to someone elses' tastes or ideals.

     When you get used to a particular sound other sounds seem odd and yes sometimes wrong, whether they are the correct thing to do or not.

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1 hour ago, MDEW said:

     You've taken my meaning the wrong way. I was undersinging.........My point was that the singers that came on the radio did not sound as if the were compressing and dampening the larynx or using Twang. I was trying all that stuff with High larynx and no compression with a straight tone.

 

to be 100% honest, I seriously doubt that any of those singers ever used those terms once in their lifetimes

 

if nothing else, all of our modern micro-dissecting should give us the ability to at least understand why this singer or that one generally sounded like they sounded

 

Me personally im trying to be comfortable sort of straddling the fence on the hyper-analytical approach. I do think a bit about curbing or edging. I do understand that a tightly supported sound is very different than a freer, unsupported sound. I understand there is a difference between sort of "holding" the note in the throat on the one hand and just totally singing with an open throat on the other hand

 

When training I am also quite aware of sensations and of feeling things in certain places...which is sort of what I understand the term "coordination" to mean. I dont have words for all of those things but I have some mental pictures of them such as "swallowing" a note as it goes thru the bridge to get it splatting on the back of the throat so as to go up into the higher ranges up near the top of the range.

That being said, when I am trying to lay down some vox, the very last thing on my mind is what the aliens on mars are wearing to their family cookout. The NEXT to the last thing on my mind is where my larynx is or whether or not my thyroid is tilted.

All that stuff is nice for TRAINING and learning your craft, but once you get ready to actually sing there is that element where you have to somewhat turn off the intellect and try to let it flow

 

Here is a guy we can probably agree on. One of my southern brothers and one of those haunting songs that put my young mind on flights of fancy. Nothing technical whatsoever going on. Dude probably learned to sing to sing as a kid and never gave it another thought

 

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      You are right Jonjon, If you are singing the songs that you want to sing and you sound good and your audience thinks it sounds good, it does not matter if you know anything about what your voice is doing. For those of us who DO NOT sound good singing the songs we want to sing, Who cannot sing the notes we want without using a tone that is considered ugly by themselves and others, having a way to find the co-ordinations and terms to help guide us is important.

      At the very least these singers who are sounding good naturally had someone somewhere say to them "Man that thing you did on the high note gave me chills". He might get the idea he did something right. When what you get is "That sucked" you have no idea if ANYTHING you did was right. And then you go searching for what is right and what is wrong. It did not stop me from singing.......... I did pretty good with Croce, Eagles, James Taylor, over 400+ songs I could perform and not totally suck if chose for that purpose.  For the songs I would have rather been singing.......... "That sucked lets get Wally to sing it."    It would have been just as easy for ANYONE to say "hey MDEW try that with an Axl sound" or "Dude give it more gas you can do it".   That stuff does not happen when someone else is available to sing the song instead of you.

         You already had a voice that is considered solid, you were already singing beyond beginner............. What you are doing now is polishing your voice. I am rebuilding from the ground up.

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10 minutes ago, MDEW said:

 For the songs I would have rather been singing.......... "That sucked lets get Wally to sing it."    It would have been just as easy for ANYONE to say "hey MDEW try that with an Axl sound" or "Dude give it more gas you can do it".   That stuff does not happen when someone else is available to sing the song instead of you.

         You already had a voice that is considered solid, you were already singing beyond beginner............. What you are doing now is polishing your voice. I am rebuilding from the ground up.

a lot of it is how you look at things. You seem to alwaaaayyyysss be looking back at how someone put you down or didnt tell you this or that to get you going in the right direction. keep on letting the past define you and, no offense, you'll always be stuck where you are

Do you know how many musicians are in my family? Yep, none. Yeah, of course my mom sang around the house like all moms do.

Do you know how many people ever told me I could sing good? Maybe 5 people in about 48 years and probably 3 of those were just being polite. I have been told many times that I couldNT sing. So why dont I just crawl under a rock and die?

About 2 years ago my ex says "I used to think you could sing so good. Oh well, I guess you're aging"

 

Hell, even on this forum im told im pitchy, my songs dont sound right, im doing this wrong, that wrong. told there is no hope for me if I dont take lessons. If I was hung up on external approval and pleasing others, I dont think id be singing at all

 

Do you know why I sing? Because I DECIDED to. That was that. Im not scared to put it out there...I dont see ANY reason why I cant make music as good as what I heard growing up...which was essentially Zep, The Beatles, VanHalen. Im not into hero worship, if they could do it, flawed as they were, so can I. Thats quite a different mindset than something like "oh gee, if I could just get this coordination right and learn this lingo then the guys on the forum will like me."

 

Same for guitar. Who in my family ever played? no one. I was almost 21 and I DECIDED to start. I was clueless and had never touched a guitar and didnt have a clue what a chord or note or scale was. Do you have any idea how many times people told me to turn it down and that it sounded like 2 cats fighting? How many times do you think I was told to turn it down so people could hear their precious TV?? MANY times.

Maybe I should have just pouted? There is a point where you just have to say "eff it" and just do the thing.

 

 

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28 minutes ago, MDEW said:

 If you are singing the songs that you want to sing and you sound good and your audience thinks it sounds good, it does not matter if you know anything about what your voice is doing. For those of us who DO NOT sound good singing the songs we want to sing, Who cannot sing the notes we want without using a tone that is considered ugly by themselves and others, having a way to find the co-ordinations and terms to help guide us is important.

again...how did the guys in the past do it?? They didnt have easy access to the info like we have.

IMO you seem a little bit over on the "tied up in knots mentally" side of things. You ever play golf? golf is very similar to singing...it can be the simplest thing or THE most complicated thing in the world.

 

I think if you want to get a certain sound then you have to see where you are now. if you are in the ballpark of that sound then you can sort of polish what you have and maybe learn a slightly different coordination....but if you are miles away then obviously a tiny change isnt going to do much. if you are miles away then there is something fundamentally different that the singer is doing and just doing some esoteric coordination isnt going to get you there. Like, if the guy habitually uses massive support and an open throat and just wails out...then you wont get there without doing those things.

Sometimes you can sneak up on something, but sometimes you have to logically look at it and go "now wait a minute, this guy is doing something different than what im doing"

 

an example: Where I am currently at, I can sort of see that if I wanted to I could do a fairly passable Steve Perry vibe and also do some of what Chris Cornell does. BUT, I am NOWHERE near getting a sound like Layne Staley. For that matter id struggle with sounding like John Fogerty. So I can sneak up on some of Chris Cornells high-screamy sound but if I want to move toward a Staley vibe then I have to sit down and work on a LOT more support and compression and distortion.

 

I sort of see you saying you are WAY off sounding like this or that guy but then you always reference these esoteric things like larynx damping. Again, im all for larynx manipulations but do you really think thats how those guys got that sound? I think there are broad categories that sounds come from. for instance a sound is either a very supported sound, or its not. A sound is either made from "holding" the note in the throat, or from letting it ring really free with an open throat. Those are broader categories than the more fine adjustments such as larynx or thyroid tilt and this muscle or that muscle being engaged. None of the guys you names knew that stuff. They heard sounds as kids and they imitated them

 

Dont miss the forest looking at the bark on the trees.

or

Get in the right state before you worry about the exact street address

 

Peace, JJ

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I gotta get in on this because nobody, really guys, nobody really will ever truly, actually, unequivacally, know for sure whether a singer has had no training, to tons of it.

Why, because you are not them!  The technique may not always be apparent in their performances!

Jon, your comment that setting a goal to sing like Mark Farner is a low goal is way off base because that is just your opinion, nothing more.

I think Farner has a killer blue eyed soul voice and tone.  The Metal guys to me are good but just not my cup of tea either. 

Take a look at this ranking list of top 100 Male Rock Vocalists and you'll be hard pressed to find a lot of Metal guys.  Yeah, I know, it's just a list of many lists out there, but a lot of guys on there I was surprised to see myself.

http://digitaldreamdoor.com/pages/best_vocalists.html

Whether you like your guys and M likes his, is just each other's right.

We all like who we like. It's all subjective.

Here's some Farner vocals you might have missed....

 

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 You still do not get it Jonjon, I am on the right track now.  I am not even speaking for myself. I am speaking for those that are in the situation that I was in. People who are viewing Videos on technique or lessons who are saying to themselves "That is not how I want to sound". These lessons and co-ordinations and talk of Terms like twang, compression, Falsetto all of that is for guidance on strengthing the voice and for FINDING co-ordinations that can lead to the sound you are looking for.

   Like it or not accessing head voice is a co-ordination. Having a dark sound with Vibrato is a co-ordination. Just as sounding like Elmo or Kermit the frog is a co-ordination. If you do not know how to manipulate your voice you can get as loud as you want and still "Flip" into a gawky, screechy unwanted sound even if you are thinking of the sound of DIO or Geoff Tate or Coverdale.

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18 minutes ago, VideoHere said:

I gotta get in on this because nobody, really guys, nobody really will ever truly, actually, unequivacally, know for sure whether a singer has had no training, to tons of it.

Why, because you are not them!  The technique may not always be apparent in their performances!

Jon, your comment that setting a goal to sing like Mark Farner is a low goal is way off base because that is just your opinion, nothing more.

I think Farner has a killer blue eyed soul voice and tone. 

 

Oh my, didnt mean to start an inter-generational war lol

 

yeah, but the point being. Mark probably learned that as a kid imitating other singers he heard on the radio or around the house or whatever.

He probably had that sound basically when he was 19 or 20 years old. Did he ever make any big improvements after that? I doubt it.

Thats why I mentioned and gave props to Paul Stanley (even though Kiss does nothing for me at all). At least Paul DID make noticeable improvements over time and would sing mark into the ground ahy day of the week. Please.

 

Paul Rogers. Im a fan. But he had a pretty good sound as a 20 yr old. Im sorry but there wasnt years and years of some kind of intensive training behind that. did he work and improve over time? yeah, he did work and get even better. Bu the basic singing qualities were there early on.

 

Steve Marriot is another one. Great singer for sure in that same "70s soulful white boy" kind of way. But he was that way as a teenager. Is that some kind of highly trained voice? Im sorry, I simply cant accept that those are very difficult styles to at least get close to. Yes, a person has their own individual tone etc, but seriously.

 

I hear on this forum all the time. "It takes YEARS to learn to sing blah blah".   I ask, does it take years to sing like Mark Farner? or Steve Marriot? What exactly would those years consist of? Learning to breath in and get a good breath?

 

yeah, lets all get uptight at how hard it is to sing decently.

 

 

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22 minutes ago, MDEW said:

 If you do not know how to manipulate your voice you can get as loud as you want and still "Flip" into a gawky, screechy unwanted sound even if are thinking of the sound of DIO or Geoff Tate or Coverdale.

True. I goofed off singing, like everyone does in the car or shower etc, for 48 years. I didnt pay it much mind and had no clue what was involved. Then at some point in 2015 I DECIDED I wanted to get into real singing. Mainly because I was tired of begging people to sing on my guitar tracks etc.

So I bought KTVA sometime in 2015 and frankly I never really got much use out of it. It was a bit disorganized and im lazy...so i wasnt a good match. And I was sort of a "choker" and we all know Kens main advice is sort of "try to take the chest voice up as high as possible before bridging".   Well that was the exact WORST thing I could do since I was already basically doing that and choking out

So in late Dec 2015 I got T4P. I checked it out for a bit and then I got interested in the girl and I forgot singing for a few months lol. Around March or April I started back singing.

I couldnt bridge. Didnt understand it. I was trying lift up pull back a bit, and I was trying to just let it break hoping that it would somehow get better but it didnt. I probably tried about 10 times and moved on lol.

Then one day at work I was trying to sing "Seasons" by Badlands and its up in headvoice. I was trying to force it up thru the throat and was doing my normal choking.

So im on my forklift at work singing as I work. After about 10 minutes I figured out how to sing up on the hard palate. I was like "ooooooooohhhhhh, thats how you get thru the bridge".

Then I simply tried a bridge and it worked first time and I came here and posted up the post of me bridging that night

 

So I am supposed to believe its really esoteric and hard to bridge?

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Jon,

Yes, maybe those guys had out-of-the-womb talent, but to do it for years and years, touring, recording, and still sound good (even if the range has dropped) I'm willing to bet nearly every single one of them had to do "something" remedial or otherwise concerning their voice at one time or another. Whether is was formal lessons with teachers or just something as simple as a long conversations with their peers, something was done, at some point in their career...guaranteed.

Just like any athlete...race car driver

Some of these earlier acts like the Righteous Brothers were "supervised" by the Mob.

The thing is not a lot of singers want to divulge this kind of information.

The out-of-the-womb advantage can only go so far.

 

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Geoff Tate was mentioned. Now thats a different story. That one would NOT be a matter of just winging it. Certain qualities would have to be strengthened etc or one just isnt even going to get close. Its like Opera, you cant wing it. I personally wouldnt even try because I know my current limitations.

 

Same for some of the Coverdale screamy stuff. Some of it takes a really strong voice that I dont have yet

 

But Mark Farner? Steve Marriot? IMHO it shouldnt take years to approach those styles.

Geoff, or Mark Boals, or Marq Torien, or my boy John Sykes could all do passable farner/marriot impressions. But can Mark Farner get into Geoffs areas? I seriously doubt it

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5 minutes ago, VideoHere said:

Jon,

Yes, maybe those guys had out-of-the-womb talent, but to do it for years and years, touring, recording, and still sound good (even if the range has dropped) I'm willing to bet nearly every single one of them had to do "something" remedial or otherwise concerning their voice at one time or another. Whether is was formal lessons with teachers or just something as simple as a long conversations with their peers, something was done, at some point in their career...guaratneed.

Just like any athlete...race car driver

Some of these earlier acts like the Righteous Brothers were "supervised" by the Mob.

The thing is not a lot of singers want to divulge this kind of information.

The out-of-the-womb advantage can only go so far.

 

yeah, but thats not what we were talking about brother. You are talking maintenance and upkeep. True, thats a whole different thing that touring guys MUST learn. Some did (Paul Rogers, Steven Tyler eventually)...some didnt and they had shorter careers or they simply sounded like totally different people

 

I am simply talking about the actual complexity of the style. Soulful chest voice singing and/or going up into the lower bridge areas etc....I just cant accept that its rocket science. Is it soulful and beautiful?? of course it is, but lets not make it out to be some unreachable goal.

Im not even THAT big of a "metal" fan to start with. I basically like the Zeppelin and VanHalen branches of rock n roll and some of the grunge vibes. That being said, you cant tell me that its as hard to sing Farner or Marriot as it is to sing like Rob Halford?? You are comparing a souped up Camaro to a Lambo

 

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Jon, I know guys that play in bands that can do Steve Perry, Geoff Tate, Striper, Winger, and others like nobody's business and drink like hell. No lessons, nothing!

You can run into guys like this....

I just read Bill Medley's book (Righteous Brothers) where he told how Bobby Hatfield (Unchained Melody) just smoked and drank. 

He DIDN"T like to sing for a living!  He did it because he couldn't become a major league baseball player!!  

It all depends on your physiological endowment too.  

They have songs that are difficult for them, that you and I would wonder how the hell that can possibly be.  There's this Robert Plant clone I know, who can't sing anything else but Led Zep songs.  Give him a Guess Who tune, he sounds like Frankie Valli!!!

 

 

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You know maybe we should start a new thread, because we're getting way off topic here.

You want to start one?

My apologies "GSoul."

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5 minutes ago, VideoHere said:

Jon, I know guys that play in bands that can do Steve Perry, Geoff Tate, Striper, Winger, and others like nobody's business and drink like hell. No lessons, nothing!

You can run into guys like this....

I just read Bill Medley's book (Righteous Brothers) where he told how Bobby Hatfield (Unchained Melody) just smoked and drank. 

He DIDN"T like to sing for a living!  He did it because he couldn't become a major league baseball player!!  

It all depends on your physiological endowment too.  

They have songs that are difficult for them, that you and I would wonder how the hell that can possibly be.  There's this Robert Plant clone I know, who can't sing anything else but Led Zep songs.  Give him a Guess Who tune, he sounds like Frankie Valli!!!

 

 

 

yeah, as u said, natural talent only takes u so far. Thats where the study and becoming a student of the art comes into play. At some point you run into a roadblock and u have to find a way around it

its like singing or playing "behind the beat". if that is ones natural vibe then some stuff will seem "easy" while some while be impossible. But its not a matter of mysticism or rocket science, its just knowledge and awareness. (physiology aside)

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yeah. didnt mean to hijack.

 

THIS gives me chills. They were huge when I was in the 4th grade but then they went out of style and we loved to make fun of them. Looking back though, to me Barry Gibb was a straight genius

 

 

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1 minute ago, JonJon said:

 

yeah, as u said, natural talent only takes u so far. Thats where the study and becoming a student of the art comes into play. At some point you run into a roadblock and u have to find a way around it

its like singing or playing "behind the beat". if that is ones natural vibe then some stuff will seem "easy" while some while be impossible. But its not a matter of mysticism or rocket science, its just knowledge and awareness. (physiology aside)

   Knowledge and awareness was my main point. Or rather lack of it from the types of music you were presented with.

    I have mentioned before that what gives me Chills with singing is Janice Joplin over Celine Dion. Very different styles. If you think Janice was just winging it you need to rethink that position. She had formal training.  Every scream was well planned out. She was a professional who worked hard and played even harder.

     Still the Chill factor is just an opinion and opinions vary.

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Totally agree, M.

Now to me the Bee Gees singing is not thought of as difficult, the way I would consider a Guess Who song difficult, BUT the Bee gees stuff needs to be very accurate, meaning the vowels, resonance, and pitch has to be dead on.

Now Jon, I could say if the Bees Gees give you chills, it really doesn't take much to get you going...LOL...just kiddin' buddy!

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Not much Technique wise but these guys really send chills down my spine and get me a little emotional.

 

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1 hour ago, VideoHere said:

Totally agree, M.

Now to me the Bee Gees singing is not thought of as difficult, the way I would consider a Guess Who song difficult, BUT the Bee gees stuff needs to be very accurate, meaning the vowels, resonance, and pitch has to be dead on.

Now Jon, I could say if the Bees Gees give you chills, it really doesn't take much to get you going...LOL...just kiddin' buddy!

has nothing at all to do with difficulty. I just dig that free time stripped down vocals feel.

I absolutely dont like "difficult" things just for the same of them being difficult. But I also dont care much for pretty basic stuff being passed off as something amazing lol

but none of that has anything to do with getting "chills"

 

This intro and song is quite captivating...but there is nothing hard about it AFAIK. Haunting though...

 

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We just cannot say "this isn't difficult."  It depends who has to sing it.

Chills, especially at 1:00..is this kind of singing "difficult?"  We may perceive it as so, (which only undermines our confidence).

Who can really say?  To me, this is singing.  To another, it's shouty, screamy, bordering on alienating.

 

 

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