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How to sing with little or lesser twang

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yongsua1995

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Hi, may I know is it possible to manipulate my timber to sing with lesser twang (higher harmonics) but with more base effect (lower harmonics) on low and middle notes? Is there any technique to shape the vocal tract to sound darker? I am always amazed by Lara Fabian's vocal technique, especially her middle notes. Her live performances of "Humana"  amaze me the most when it comes to her middle notes belt. I analyzed her belts with spectrum as well as spectogram and I found that her lower harmonics (approx. 1000 Hertz - 1200 Hertz)  are very strong till that I can hear the powerful amplification from my speakers. She is "lyrically dramatic singer" for me.

Below video shows one of her performances of "Humana". Her head voice at the end of this video also consists of strong lower harmonics.

Thank You.

 

 

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I'm not realy an expert, but I would assume that lower / higher harmonics have all to do with the shape of the vocal tract, and that lower harmonics require a more open space to resonate, and it looks like she is doing that as she opens her mouth wide on the higher notes.

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4 minutes ago, Miki B said:

I'm not realy an expert, but I would assume that lower / higher harmonics have all to do with the shape of the vocal tract, and that lower harmonics require a more open space to resonate, and it looks like she is doing that as she opens her mouth wide on the higher notes.

Not sure about it. I tried them before but I failed to do so. I don't know how she has done that to her voice. The spectrum shows very little twang in her voice and with very strong lower harmonics that produce tingling sensation to the back of my heads and ears. It sounds like a "knocking door reflected sound" or "Hi-Fi system". I don't know how to describe it. Sorry.

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For me personally twang is a sensation that is easily manipulated and dialed to whatever degree I choose. As you train to isolate the sensation of twang in conjunction with training to be able to consciously manipulate the position of the larynx + understanding how different vowels will induce brighter or lower harmonics.. then reducing or adding twang/brightness becomes a very simple and conscious choice.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

Personally the idea of singing "with less twang" does not really work well. Remember that twang is a necessity in your voice.

It is more about adding more dark overtones, while still keeping the same amount of twang going. At least if you don't want to get too breathy. A "dramatic" sound, even if dark, still needs A LOT of twang to be stable.

It is basically the difference between "dampening" (as Robert describes in the video posted here) and "dumping" of the larynx. Dampening is basically increasing dark overtones while keeping the twang, and dumping is just giving up the twang and letting the larynx drop.

The main thing in getting the sound more dark and dramatic is a lift of the soft palate while keeping the twang in place. Think of a "dome" or big resonance space in the area of the joint of the jaw. The larger this space gets, the more dark and round the sound. However, increasing space in the vocal tract always increases the acoustic load and creates the need more more support.

A good way to get the sound darker in the first place is to train with a high back of the tongue on NG. Send the "resonance" up through the soft palate into the head cavity while doing this. This will get you a dark sound but on a lighter fold mass. It lifts the palate but the high tongue will help to not create too much space in the vocal tract and stay on an acceptable intensity level.

In a second step you can add more "bite" or "smile" to the sound, which typically triggers a lowering of the tongue and increases space in the vocal tract again. This raises intensity and creates a more heavy sound. Just keep in mind to keep the palate in its (high) place, as a lowering will get you back to a very bright sound again.

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I have to agree with Benny. Singing with less twang is a bit oxymoronic. Twang is the narrowing of the AES, and this happens when you sing and when you speak. So, it is not anatomically possible to speak or sing without twang unless you have a physical disability that stops that process, in which case, all your sounds will be gutteral and you have more problems than just singing.

 

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Ron, the AES is the aryeppiglotic sphincter, it is the muscle that narrows the epiglottic funnel and covers the trachea when we swallow. It is the muscle that causes the narrowing, it isn't the narrowing itself. Also it is possible to speak and sing without twang. You simply open your glottis and modify to falsetto and whispering. 

However, Im nit picking you here... your main point is, there is no reason to disregard vocal twang in singing and your totally right. To do so, would be an oxymoron.

If you want to sing well, you have to twang... so you had better understand what twang it. 

In regards to the original question. how to sing with less twang... you wouldn't want to sing with less twang, per se... which is Ron's point. But you might want to sing with less compression. All twang has compression, but not all compression levels are twang. Sometimes its too much and it becomes quack mode, not twang mode and that sounds awful.

We need a sound sample of what your talking about. If you want a detailed review of your issue, go to the Review My Singing forum, pay $10 and let us hear what your doing.

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On 9/5/2016 at 7:53 AM, benny82 said:

Personally the idea of singing "with less twang" does not really work well. Remember that twang is a necessity in your voice.

It is more about adding more dark overtones, while still keeping the same amount of twang going. At least if you don't want to get too breathy. A "dramatic" sound, even if dark, still needs A LOT of twang to be stable.

It is basically the difference between "dampening" (as Robert describes in the video posted here) and "dumping" of the larynx. Dampening is basically increasing dark overtones while keeping the twang, and dumping is just giving up the twang and letting the larynx drop.

The main thing in getting the sound more dark and dramatic is a lift of the soft palate while keeping the twang in place. Think of a "dome" or big resonance space in the area of the joint of the jaw. The larger this space gets, the more dark and round the sound. However, increasing space in the vocal tract always increases the acoustic load and creates the need more more support.

A good way to get the sound darker in the first place is to train with a high back of the tongue on NG. Send the "resonance" up through the soft palate into the head cavity while doing this. This will get you a dark sound but on a lighter fold mass. It lifts the palate but the high tongue will help to not create too much space in the vocal tract and stay on an acceptable intensity level.

In a second step you can add more "bite" or "smile" to the sound, which typically triggers a lowering of the tongue and increases space in the vocal tract again. This raises intensity and creates a more heavy sound. Just keep in mind to keep the palate in its (high) place, as a lowering will get you back to a very bright sound again.

Exactly.  Twang can be present in a voice without there being any knowledge of trying to engage it. 

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