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R.I.P. Chris Cornell

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benny82

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It is interesting to notice which singers students try to do covers of and admire the most. Chris Cornell is one such singer. Singing and training Chris Cornell songs is a very common occurrence. We will all miss hearing more ... but he will continue to be remembered and appreciated in a unique way by voice coaches and singers forever.

 

 

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10 hours ago, Robert Lunte said:

Felipe, love your idea... thx.

Geoff what do you say we take this to the "challenge" forum?

 

It's cool by me. I didn't want to suggest that it be a challenge, even though it would be virtually the same thing as a tribute thread, like the Late Legends Challenge.

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I always loved the lyrics to this song... especially the hook.... how I feel sometimes ... 

 
Well, I've been watching
While you've been coughing
I've been drinking life
While you've been nauseous
And so I drink to health
While you kill yourself
And I've got just one thing
That I can offer

Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me, yeah

I'm not a martyr
I'm not a prophet
And I won't preach to you
But here's a caution
You better understand
That I won't hold your hand
But if it helps you mend
Then I won't stop it

Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me, yeah
Drown, if you want
And…
 
Well, I've been watching
While you've been coughing
I've been drinking life
While you've been nauseous
And so I drink to health
While you kill yourself
And I've got just one thing
That I can offer

Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me, yeah

I'm not a martyr
I'm not a prophet
And I won't preach to you
But here's a caution
You better understand
That I won't hold your hand
But if it helps you mend
Then I won't stop it

Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me, yeah
Drown, if you want
And…
 
Well, I've been watching
While you've been coughing
I've been drinking life
While you've been nauseous
And so I drink to health
While you kill yourself
And I've got just one thing
That I can offer
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me, yeah
I'm not a martyr
I'm not a prophet
And I won't preach to you
But here's a caution
You better understand
That I won't hold your hand
But if it helps you mend
Then I won't stop it
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me
Go on and save yourself
And take it out on me, yeah
Drown, if you want
And
 
 
I also like this tune a lot... I totally get it... This is the era that I knew / met Chris...
 
 
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8 hours ago, Robert Lunte said:

 

I lost my first cousin to suicide. He hung himself on July 1st, 2014. So I guess your post/argument was for me too. I AM that family member that has experienced it which you are referring to and that you're making an argument for.

 

Click the link below.

https://thevocaliststudio.com/justin-radomile/

So... do you have more advice for me regarding my opinion of suicide and what it means to the families?

 

Apart from the fact that I did consider your point. This topic should ONLY be about the music, I get it.

So, are you done now?

yes, that's the end of it.

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I'm a big fan of his ability just to get out an acoustic guitar and sing out a tune. Some of my favourite performances of his are via a handheld camera in the audience... just open and honest artistry. A lot of people love his range and power, I love his ability to do it all acoustically as well. I got into him a lot later in his career, with Audioslave. What made me really pay attention was his acoustic rendition of 'Like a Stone'.

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18 minutes ago, kirkovin84 said:

I'm a big fan of his ability just to get out an acoustic guitar and sing out a tune. Some of my favourite performances of his are via a handheld camera in the audience... just open and honest artistry. A lot of people love his range and power, I love his ability to do it all acoustically as well. I got into him a lot later in his career, with Audioslave. What made me really pay attention was his acoustic rendition of 'Like a Stone'.

That's actually a really good point. I agree, when he goes acoustic it has a very genuine vibe to it. Just raw, natural talent.

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      R.I.P. Chris. I can't say that I was a fan. Note the PAST tense, I can't say that I WAS. I had never consciously listed to SoundGarden or AudioSlave. It just was not my style of music. I have spent the last few hours listening to Chris. I get it. I have spent the last few months feeling beaten down, used and abused. No need to go into why, let's just say life has been sucking pretty bad lately. Chris has captured that feeling and expressed it with a mastery that should be admired.

      I also need to say this, It is a good place to visit every now and then to release the stress, anger and burden that gets piled up on you  throughout this journey we call life, but man, don't live there. There is some light in this world also. Use the darkness to give yourself strength, will, and determination to get yourself out.

      

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  • 3 weeks later...

Having been impressed with Chris Cornell's singing at a point just after having received vocal training, I was interested in hearing his experience in receiving training.  I could hear over the years (late 80's through 2010) that good things were happening in his voice.  I understood from interviews I had viewed or read that he had some typical drug and alcohol struggles and how this negatively impacted his voice for a time.

First there was Robert Lunte's accounting of Cornell's history with Maestro David Kyle as a coach in the 90's.

Next,  I read that Ron Anderson had coached Cornell for a number of years. I did see the photo on Ron's website of the two of them. http://www.ronandersonvocals.com/   Ron is an amazing singing Maestro as well, as his reputation underscores.  I wrote to him and asked if he would comment on his years as vocal coach to Chris Cornell.  As expected, Ron had some serious wisdom to pass along! I thought it would be cool to share with all of you TMVW peoples! I asked and Ron granted permission to share! 

 

Dear Kevin,

 

Thank you for your concern, it is important for people to understand that training voices is not about only belting and only emulating scales to reach a particular pitch but about really transforming your body to create appropriate habits in your whole body (body: whole instrument) (vocal cords: only a minimal part of the [body] instrument) this is aimed to give you strength to carry notes to the limit accordingly and effortlessly (we worked hard on developing his sound for many years and he is was a great human being whom I am going to miss forever. That's the training I provide and I am happy and honored Chris was my long lifetime student. RIP Chris #messenger 

 

 

 

 

AndersonCornell5.jpg

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How many years had Cornell been singing before he hooked up with Ron Anderson? about the same as when Stevie and Michael hooked up with Seth Riggs? or the 5 lessons Geoff Tate took with David Kyle? I hate it when vocal coaches claim their celeb students. A lip roll, a vowel and a 30 minute warmup is not teaching someone how to sing. Show me a clip of these coaches singing any more than a vocalise please.  

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11 hours ago, kirkovin84 said:

 I hate it when vocal coaches claim their celeb students. A lip roll, a vowel and a 30 minute warmup is not teaching someone how to sing. Show me a clip of these coaches singing any more than a vocalise please.  

Hilarious Kirkovin84!  I know what you mean! thanks for the hearty chuckle! :D

I believe Ron is agreeing with you in his statement! Real life, honest, "Maestros" continue providing sage counsel through the the many variables a singer will encounter in a career of singing. These singer students are not only maintaining the health of the voice but, also keeping the voice limber, agile, accurate, and strong through the demand of months of use way beyond the average "singers" experience.  I know of at least three rock star singers this level of demand brought their singing voice to the brink of disaster or worse.

One simple example I thought of was; you've got 20 performances over two months and you catch a head cold. You've got to have a preemptive environment to avoid infections of any kind! For certain, that stupid little annoyance of a head cold will obliterate your passaggio if it morphs into a cough!

We can learn all the vocalise in every program and end up far "shy of the mark" in ability, if we're not getting guidance on, or learning and applying multiple other health and wellness habits to keep the singing voice at it's optimal strength and coordination. I do not yet consistently apply all these "healthy voice" habits/routines as intensely as I need to yet, the improvement of the singing voice will blatantly confirm the positive results of good vocal health.

I spoke to a famous rock singer once about this, as it turned out, he was well aware how little your vocal health can afford to suffer without severe consequences.  When asking him about the "highest" note he could sing confidently he would qualify his answer and say, "well, on a good night, I can sing up to a. . . . " This statement assumed the voice was healthy (no illness in the body), and there are yet still variables that can negatively impact your peak performance potential! It's way easier for people who have lots of money OR their career relies on it, to have a wise consult who not only knows the anatomy and physics, but also knows the singer AND their voice . . . . really well!

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On 6/11/2017 at 11:28 PM, kirkovin84 said:

How many years had Cornell been singing before he hooked up with Ron Anderson? about the same as when Stevie and Michael hooked up with Seth Riggs? or the 5 lessons Geoff Tate took with David Kyle? I hate it when vocal coaches claim their celeb students. A lip roll, a vowel and a 30 minute warmup is not teaching someone how to sing. Show me a clip of these coaches singing any more than a vocalise please.  

If you do not know the reasons for the exercises they cannot help you. Just doing lip bubbles or tongue trills does not mean any thing if you do not transfer the concept they teach into your singing.  Different volumes(loud to soft), Timbres and effects call for different strategies and coordinations. Having someone who can hear where things are going wrong is a big help. That is what a coach does. He sees/hears your strengths and weaknesses and guides you to a solution.

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Hey Folks,

Just popping in to say "Hi."  Been busy with the store.  Haven't had the time to participate.  Hope all is well with everyone.

Bob

Chris Cornell...sad and what really gets me is it might have been avoided.

 

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Hey Bob, welcome back.  Good to hear from you. 

2 minutes ago, VideoHere said:

Chris Cornell...sad and what really gets me is it might have been avoided.

Definitely. Sort of like taking a gold nugget and tossing it off the ferry and watching it sink. It is wasteful and pointless it seems. But others have pointed out that its hard to know what's going on in someone's head. Obviously, it is an illness, or a momentary lapse of madness. Was it an accident? Doesn't seem like it, but not sure anyone knows.

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On 6/11/2017 at 8:28 PM, kirkovin84 said:

How many years had Cornell been singing before he hooked up with Ron Anderson? about the same as when Stevie and Michael hooked up with Seth Riggs? or the 5 lessons Geoff Tate took with David Kyle? I hate it when vocal coaches claim their celeb students. A lip roll, a vowel and a 30 minute warmup is not teaching someone how to sing. Show me a clip of these coaches singing any more than a vocalise please.  

I have to agree. I preface this by saying it doesn't take anything away from coaches who had these limited associations. But the fact remains, these are limited associations and the sort of motor skills and talent we are typically talking about with this sort of name dropping is not developed in 6 voice lessons, or a couple warm-up sessions before the show when they came to town. Kirk is onto something. I believe most of these sort of coat-tail claims are overblown. That isn't to say the artist didn't get something from it, but to for anyone to claim that they might of been the main influence in developing Chris Cornell or Michael Jackson's voice is just not realistic.

Again, nothing against the coaches, but let's be realistic.

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5 hours ago, MDEW said:

Having someone who can hear where things are going wrong is a big help. That is what a coach does. He sees/hears your strengths and weaknesses and guides you to a solution.

A really good point and the reason why the most talented and capable among us, are still great candidates for voice coaching. Great voices like Cornell, Streisand or Jackson are not taking lessons to 'learn to sing'.. they are getting in front of trained ears that are trained to hear colors in the voice which are symptoms of physical and acoustic configurations that can be fixed, tweaked and/or improved.

This may sound lofty, but I know for a fact that even if Chris Cornell is a better singer then I am by most people's assessment, I know that if I ran him through my routines, my ears would tell me things that he is not aware of, that would enable me to make suggestions to add value and help. That is what voice coaches do for people like this, ... lend them trained ears to diagnose and make technique suggestions to make improvements. That is the role of "voice coach", not "famous singer". Great voice coaches have great, uniquely tuned, sensitive ears to hearing sound colors. We are doctors of singing so to speak and the sound colors we hear are giving us symptoms of issues that can be addressed. Doesn't matter who you are, if you are not practiced at listening in this way, your not going to be an expert at it.

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