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I know that classifying a voice type isn’t something I should focus on but I’m just curious about what I would be labeled as. My speaking range is from G2/Ab2-D3/E3 (this is just when I speak, I tend to reach G2 when I’m tired or sick) I am untrained and have never taken a singing class, but the highest my chest voice can push if I try is D4 and maybe F4. I don’t try and use head or falsetto since I don’t want to damage my chords since I’m not a trained singer but I feel in mixed and in head voice I could reach higher notes. Again, I know voice classification shouldn’t matter and that everyone has their own unique voice but I am curious what I would be labeled. Btw I’m new on this forum and I wasn’t sure where to post this.

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Speaking voice has nothing to do with your vocal type. Our own in-house coach, Draven Grey has even said most of his students speak at the lower end of their range. I think voice type has more to do with where your voice sits. So, where you can sing with the most ease while using proper technique.That's what I've gathered.

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Speech mode and what we do when we are singing, cry mode, twang mode, others... are not the same thing. This is one of the first things students have to understand too stop being confused and get progress.

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Stop pushing and start singing. Train. Join Robert's course. Vocal Fach  or classification is only needed when there are pre-written parts for specific voice types (both range and color), such as in musicals, opera, and choir. Contemporary singing rarely needs more than just knowing your range. And since singing is very different than speech, your speaking voice is no indication of actual vocal range. So you know, mixed voice (more aptly "mixed resonance") IS head voice. Within the head voice range, you can open to more air (falsetto) or reconnect to your chest voice musculature by "mixing" them back in. Falsetto won't damage your voice any more than whispering would (which it can, surprisingly). However ,pushing to go higher and higher can be dangerous.

When you start training, remember this:

 

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On 11/14/2018 at 10:14 AM, Draven Grey said:

Stop pushing and start singing. Train. Join Robert's course. Vocal Fach  or classification is only needed when there are pre-written parts for specific voice types (both range and color), such as in musicals, opera, and choir. Contemporary singing rarely needs more than just knowing your range. And since singing is very different than speech, your speaking voice is no indication of actual vocal range. So you know, mixed voice (more aptly "mixed resonance") IS head voice. Within the head voice range, you can open to more air (falsetto) or reconnect to your chest voice musculature by "mixing" them back in. Falsetto won't damage your voice any more than whispering would (which it can, surprisingly). However ,pushing to go higher and higher can be dangerous.

When you start training, remember this:

 

On point.

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