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Tenor Humming Vocalizes

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If you are a teacher then you should notice his breath support and wether or not said student runs out of air before the end of the choir 

 

Resonance in the mask ay, please explain how humming moves the resonance from the throat to the head please

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Resonant Tracking, Nasal Buzzing, or humming while buzzing the lip ("M", although could be n or ng too), can bring the resonance into the mask and out of the throat. This will cause better control over the compression and air pressure balance, and cause more resonance in the soft palate by engaging twang vocal mode. Another semi-occluded phonation he could try is humming into a cocktail straw and trying to get light and whimpery on higher pitches. This activates cry vocal mode, releases pharyngeal tension, and also thins out the glottis which then requires much less pressure to phonate.

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44 minutes ago, Draven Grey said:

Resonant Tracking, Nasal Buzzing, or humming while buzzing the lip ("M", although could be n or ng too), can bring the resonance into the mask and out of the throat. This will cause better control over the compression and air pressure balance, and cause more resonance in the soft palate by engaging twang vocal mode. Another semi-occluded phonation he could try is humming into a cocktail straw and trying to get light and whimpery on higher pitches. This activates cry vocal mode, releases pharyngeal tension, and also thins out the glottis which then requires much less pressure to phonate.

Your are right, OP could have there student move the resonance around away from the throat, but OP  did not advocate this, and thus one one think it is humming as the humming sense who to most people who don't train to sing 

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14 minutes ago, Milly said:

Your are right, OP could have there student move the resonance around away from the throat, but OP  did not advocate this, and thus one one think it is humming as the humming sense who to most people who don't train to sing 

I apologize for any confusion, but the humming I was referring to was the more technical form mentioned in Draven's post. In my original post, I was asking specifically if my student's humming was causing an air support issue within this exercise. Of course I will continue to look for and notice his breath support to watch for issues. Thank you for your responses!

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1 hour ago, Draven Grey said:

Resonant Tracking, Nasal Buzzing, or humming while buzzing the lip ("M", although could be n or ng too), can bring the resonance into the mask and out of the throat. This will cause better control over the compression and air pressure balance, and cause more resonance in the soft palate by engaging twang vocal mode. Another semi-occluded phonation he could try is humming into a cocktail straw and trying to get light and whimpery on higher pitches. This activates cry vocal mode, releases pharyngeal tension, and also thins out the glottis which then requires much less pressure to phonate.

Thank you for the helpful advice and the explanation! I knew the technical humming brings resonance into the mask, but I did not quite grasp how this affected air pressure balance or compression, so this will be very useful!

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In my experience humming high notes for a while (like a 3 to 5 min song) is like fasseto. It leaves you very tiered  and out of breath, is this what you mean? 

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Just because you are making a humming sound does not mean your vocal cords and vocal tract is in a healthy coordination. You can hum on a falsetto with a raised larynx and all that work is wasted.

Hum on a VOICED dopey UH and keep a connected sound. The closed mouth and buzzing lips makes it easier to stay connected but it does not guarantee that you will. The voiced UH will help keep the larynx stable and you can still HEAR and FEEL the disconnect when and if it happens. This way you can monitor when the disconnect happens and you adjust accordingly as you practice. 

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