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This song is out there.  I like it, I'm happy with it, but I want to learn how to take my voice higher obviously.  I'm a baritone I think.  I can hit A4 but not with agility.  This song goes up to F#4 which is typical of baritone.  Constructive criticism is appreciated.  Take a listen to my voice and let me know what you hear.  Thank you!

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1socIDJTGXkjGqf01oIiebfCOlYT3M06d

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In order to sing higher, you need to develop your pharyngeal voice. You should start connecting it with your chest voice at around an F4 or F#4. That's how you'll prevent pulling your chest voice up and sing very high effortlessly. 

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On 12/11/2018 at 12:42 PM, sp3c13srock said:

This song is out there.  I like it, I'm happy with it, but I want to learn how to take my voice higher obviously.  I'm a baritone I think.

spc3c...,

Excellent composition! Great style and arrangement, good air play material, catchy hooks, lots of melody! Very good musicianship!  Your voice is very marketable as well! Reminds me a little bit of Tyler Joseph (21 Pilots), maybe a dash of Matt Shultz (Cage The Elephant)!  I like it a lot! 

When you sing the lyric, "with no place to go home" - Sounds to me like you're singing with good connection in the lower realm of your head voice!  Double check with a coach, but I'm fairly certain. I would predict that with just a couple months of committed training with a good coach and training system, you will sing much higher!

You should check out Robert Lunte's Youtube channel and search for lectures on the subject of Baritone's singing high notes.  Lot's of good solid facts that will power you up with confidence about the reality of expanding your range to include notes more common to a tenor. The truth is, you'll learn in those videos that vocal "Fach," (Bass, Baritone, Tenor, Alto, Soprano) are essentially a distraction in vocal training. Proper training leads to expansion of range, coordination, strength, respiration, and also, confidence, projection, release of tension, vibrato, distortion, . . . . the list is long! The point is, it takes work in the vocal "gym" so to speak, that being vocal workouts that bring the above mentioned qualities to your singing voice.

Are you training? Do you have a vocal training program or a coach you are studying with?

It's never been more affordable than today!

peace,

k

 

 

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27 minutes ago, Kevin Ashe said:

spc3c...,

Excellent composition! Great style and arrangement, good air play material, catchy hooks, lots of melody! Very good musicianship!  Your voice is very marketable as well! Reminds me a little bit of Tyler Joseph (21 Pilots), maybe a dash of Matt Shultz (Cage The Elephant)!  I like it a lot! 

When you sing the lyric, "with no place to go home" - Sounds to me like you're singing with good connection in the lower realm of your head voice!  Double check with a coach, but I'm fairly certain. I would predict that with just a couple months of committed training with a good coach and training system, you will sing much higher!

You should check out Robert Lunte's Youtube channel and search for lectures on the subject of Baritone's singing high notes.  Lot's of good solid facts that will power you up with confidence about the reality of expanding your range to include notes more common to a tenor. The truth is, you'll learn in those videos that vocal "Fach," (Bass, Baritone, Tenor, Alto, Soprano) are essentially a distraction in vocal training. Proper training leads to expansion of range, coordination, strength, respiration, and also, confidence, projection, release of tension, vibrato, distortion, . . . . the list is long! The point is, it takes work in the vocal "gym" so to speak, that being vocal workouts that bring the above mentioned qualities to your singing voice.

Are you training? Do you have a vocal training program or a coach you are studying with?

It's never been more affordable than today!

peace,

k

 

 

Hey thanks for taking the time to listen and write this up!  Appreciate the kind words as well.  Good timing, just sat down at the computer to work on some music.  I will definitely check out Robert Lunte.  I am not training with anyone, no.  That's cool to hear I could be in the lower realm of head voice.  I can take my head voice really high but not with any control or without straining.  Here's an example.  I get to G5 but it's obvious to me my diaphragmatic support is weak hence the shaky transitions between passagios.  After G4 or so, my voice is so inflexible that I can't really do anything with these notes at this point.  Sorry for your ears lol.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1XeAtfESk7_kxclzd4uG-5XWwOyT8wEnH

 

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3 hours ago, sp3c13srock said:

  Sorry for your ears lol.

 

That siren wasn't horrible. You got a little shaky right at the passaggio. Now I would check with Robert Lunte on this but I would say

1- your right about diaphragmatic support, that will stabilize some on this and is important for most all phonations.

2- It sounds like the shakiness has to do with the weakness in your passaggio, your trying to make a good connected sound when it's not easy for you, and your probably worried (at least subconsciously) about pushing/choking, and that just adds to the tentativeness.  I think if you look up the "lift up, pull back" vocal exercise found on Rob Lunte's Youtube channel, that is a passaggio tension releasing exercise that should help you.  It allows you to engage the passaggio with zero tension, then add in more connection as you move past the break.  It's an easy tension free falsetto phonation that over time, you begin to add in more and more vocal fold connection or mass (within the passaggio).  I never had this exercise when I was training for more strength and connection at the break, it's a brilliant innovation that will keep your constrictors at bay, and ultimately leads to more power with no tension as your strength on those passaggio notes grows!

good luck Bro!

k

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hey sp3c.....,

I forgot that the review my singing cost's like $10 in here. Either Draven or Robert (there may even be others now - coaches) will review your material and refute or confirm the advice I gave you. Plus answer any further questions you may have.

 

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It's so true what you say, Kevin. It's all psychological. I still suffer from constriction from time to time as my mind gets in the way and my body interprets the coming note as a "high note".  If I remember to step back and use my prominent leg and backside muscles on the higher frequency, it tends to help a great deal as it takes my mind off the "high note" and mentally changes it to what it really is: tilted T.C and thinner chords. The results are amazing once I remember to take the thought of the high note out of it. 

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[Constriction and "choking" can also be a protective reflex. If the body detects that the pressure or airflow at the throat is unhealthy, it says, "forget the singing" and reflexes to shut off the problem. Just like your "blink" reflex, it is not a good idea to try to simply override it psychologically. You need to address the thing that is causing the reflex. For singing this is likely to be something like inadequate breath support.]

Anyway, back to the OP. Decent vocals, imo.

With proper diaphragmatic breath support, your voice will glide effortlessly straight over the passaggio, and you will get that responsiveness and agility you are looking for. I notice in classical training techniques that they make a big deal out of breath support (probably coming from traditions of singing without a mic), and relatively less of a deal about the passaggio (even though the term comes out of that pedagogy). Once you are able to employ a good diaphragmatic breath support method, .like appoggio, the passaggio is no longer a big challenge. It gets "fixed" almost automatically.

Add that to the fact that you are able to siren up to G5 (wobbly, but an impressive foundation), I think you can really take your vocals places. 

Yup, I am not a coach. Just my personal take. ;)

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Cool tune. I'm curious have you been listening to The Verve and Richard Ashcroft?  Your singing and voice reminds me a lot of Richard Ashcroft.

 

You should listen to some the old stuff from "The Verve" his band before he went solo... super cool music.

Your track seems to have a lot of tuning on the vocal tracks... why? Your voice doesn't sound like it needs much. 

My program is only $20. Check it out. Coach

http://bit.ly/TVSLiteCourse20

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17 hours ago, Robert Lunte said:

Cool tune. I'm curious have you been listening to The Verve and Richard Ashcroft?  Your singing and voice reminds me a lot of Richard Ashcroft.

 

You should listen to some the old stuff from "The Verve" his band before he went solo... super cool music.

Your track seems to have a lot of tuning on the vocal tracks... why? Your voice doesn't sound like it needs much. 

My program is only $20. Check it out. Coach

http://bit.ly/TVSLiteCourse20

I remember The Verve but wouldn't consider them or Richard Ashcroft as influences.  I can hear similarities though.  Fair enough on the tuning, here's one with it stripped from verse/chorus.  Left it on the background stuff.  https://drive.google.com/open?id=1skYgk4PUvekQUyKgnIApp6P9E_fuLEDK

 

Thanks for the feedback, will take a look at the course!

 

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On 12/15/2018 at 8:47 AM, kickingtone said:

[Constriction and "choking" can also be a protective reflex. If the body detects that the pressure or airflow at the throat is unhealthy, it says, "forget the singing" and reflexes to shut off the problem. Just like your "blink" reflex, it is not a good idea to try to simply override it psychologically. You need to address the thing that is causing the reflex. For singing this is likely to be something like inadequate breath support.]

Anyway, back to the OP. Decent vocals, imo.

With proper diaphragmatic breath support, your voice will glide effortlessly straight over the passaggio, and you will get that responsiveness and agility you are looking for. I notice in classical training techniques that they make a big deal out of breath support (probably coming from traditions of singing without a mic), and relatively less of a deal about the passaggio (even though the term comes out of that pedagogy). Once you are able to employ a good diaphragmatic breath support method, .like appoggio, the passaggio is no longer a big challenge. It gets "fixed" almost automatically.

Add that to the fact that you are able to siren up to G5 (wobbly, but an impressive foundation), I think you can really take your vocals places. 

Yup, I am not a coach. Just my personal take. ;)

Cool, appreciate the feedback, thank you!

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