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Kevin Ashe

VOCAL TRACK ANALYSIS - How My Instrument Is Set Up

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I decided to run a little experiment and (for the first time in my life) analyze exactly what notes comprise the M1, M2, and what I'll call M3 regions of my vocal track. Just for fun, and to share with some of my fellow voice geeks here.

Even though I received effective vocal coaching, it was a long time ago when popular vocal teachers did not bother explaining or analyzing anything unless you were willing to sit there and pay $80/hr. to chat (never happened for me). As a result, I never paid too much attention to notes and my "range."  I would always reference songs my vocal hero's were singing, and I could tell my M2 notes were getting beefier from the vocal instruction / training. 

It is interesting to note that, after so many years of singing without strain in M2, I actually forgot how to pull chest voice. I discovered this one day when someone asked me to explain to them how I was able to sing "tenor notes" when they knew I was a baritone. I started to explain the difference between M1 & M2, I wanted to sing an example of straining to sing a high C. We all had a laugh as I struggled to remember how to pull M1 that high without singing in M2. 

So, lately I've been contemplating expanding my range a tad higher than I've been satisfied with for so many years.

The pdf illustrates what I found out about my "instrument." 

I thought it was interesting to see how much more agile my M2 is than my M1! The overlaps are also interesting for me to see correlated with the notes.

I'd like to start training those weaker M2 notes. I'd like to see if I can change the pink D#5, and A5, to red! Only two notes yet, I know it will take a lot of effort, those notes are not easy to make beefy.

MY VOCAL TRACK ILLUSTRATED.pdf

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