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head voice

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NCdan
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I just stumbled across head voice today. I wasn't even trying; I just noticed that the impossible high notes were quite feasible and didn't require me to blow out my lungs trying to hit them. I think I had previously been going up into head voice occasionally on high notes without realizing it before. Either that or I would start pulling chest and just figured that I needed to practice more to get stronger vocal cords. The sky is the limit now, haha. Any tips on practicing head voice or common pitfalls to avoid? Thanks.

:D

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I just stumbled across head voice today. I wasn't even trying; I just noticed that the impossible high notes were quite feasible and didn't require me to blow out my lungs trying to hit them. I think I had previously been going up into head voice occasionally on high notes without realizing it before. Either that or I would start pulling chest and just figured that I needed to practice more to get stronger vocal cords. The sky is the limit now, haha. Any tips on practicing head voice or common pitfalls to avoid? Thanks.

:D

NCdan: Way cool. Congrats.

Alternate your headvoice practice with lower voice sections, and then combine them in exercises that span the whole voice. 2-octave sirens (up and then down) work really well for that. on Oh, EH and Ih vowels.

Also, play around with bringing the head voice downward from the top... into the passaggio range. It will give you a cool sense of control.

Don't work it too hard. The coordination will tire if you do it too much.

Yiou are on the road. Again, congrats on your accomplishment.

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The sky is the limit now, haha. Any tips on practicing head voice or common pitfalls to avoid? Thanks.

:D

I know the feeling. When I finally developed it in 1988, I was happy that I could do the "Immigrant Song" with conviction and volume. And I could finally do the ending parts of "Stairway to Heaven" in something other than falsetto.

Blessings on you.

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Alternate your headvoice practice with lower voice sections, and then combine them in exercises that span the whole voice. 2-octave sirens (up and then down) work really well for that. on Oh, EH and Ih vowels.

Also, play around with bringing the head voice downward from the top... into the passaggio range. It will give you a cool sense of control.

I can see how going back and forth between head and chest will build strength, because it's easier to just stay in one or the other. I'll have to record myself to see how natural the transitions sound, haha. Are you saying that certain vowels don't work very well in head voice, or that oh, eh, and ih vowels help to develop head voice the most?

One thing I'm curious about, does someone like Dexter Holland (singer for the Offspring) transition between head and chest voice, or does he use only chest? Also, can I get distortion/vocal fry sounding seamless between head and chest voice or will there be some sort of noticable difference? Thanks for the support, guys.

:D

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I can see how going back and forth between head and chest will build strength, because it's easier to just stay in one or the other. I'll have to record myself to see how natural the transitions sound, haha. Are you saying that certain vowels don't work very well in head voice, or that oh, eh, and ih vowels help to develop head voice the most?

:D

NCdan: The point of the alternation is to avoid overtaxing your newfound vocal coordination. For something like this recently discovered, the singer's tendency will be to dwell on it so much as to forget that singing in one range only is fatiguing. So, my advice... certainly use the head voice, and also keep using all the rest of it, too.

I suggested Oh, Eh and Ih because they have lower passaggio points, they naturally 'bridge early' when doing a siren. That is an assist in learning how to smoothly transition between the lower and higher ranges, in either direction. The siren is recommended as a way to begin to establish vocal coordination which spans the entire range.

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