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lower bass and position of head

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I don't understand why this happens to me.

My practice has been to try to keep my head just slightly forward (maybe at 95 to 100 degree angle, with 0 degree at top of head). This produces clearer mid and highs, which makes sense because because the pharynx can then better place the sound to the nasal pharynx and upper pallet.

I would have thought that this same angle would optimize resonance of low notes as well, as this is maximizes the length of my vocal tract--minimizes the number of bends in the larynx-pharynx tract. However, when I bend my head about 100 to 125 degrees, my lows are fuller, and easier to do. Does anyone have any ideas on why this is or are experiencing the same?

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I don't understand why this happens to me.

My practice has been to try to keep my head just slightly forward (maybe at 95 to 100 degree angle, with 0 degree at top of head). This produces clearer mid and highs, which makes sense because because the pharynx can then better place the sound to the nasal pharynx and upper pallet.

I would have thought that this same angle would optimize resonance of low notes as well, as this is maximizes the length of my vocal tract--minimizes the number of bends in the larynx-pharynx tract. However, when I bend my head about 100 to 125 degrees, my lows are fuller, and easier to do. Does anyone have any ideas on why this is or are experiencing the same?

WebAndNet: I am confused, so I will ask a clarifying question: Are you saying that you experience fuller and easier lows when you tip your head farther forward?

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My practice has been to try to keep my head just slightly forward (maybe at 95 to 100 degree angle, with 0 degree at top of head). This produces clearer mid and highs, which makes sense because because the pharynx can then better place the sound to the nasal pharynx and upper pallet.

I would have thought that this same angle would optimize resonance of low notes as well, as this is maximizes the length of my vocal tract--minimizes the number of bends in the larynx-pharynx tract. However, when I bend my head about 100 to 125 degrees, my lows are fuller, and easier to do. Does anyone have any ideas on why this is or are experiencing the same?

WebAndNet: Thanks for your reply.

I think it could be that tilting the head forward lowers the hyoid bone, from which the larynx is suspended. This may result in an overall lower larynx position in the throat, giving a longer vocal tract and lower frequency resonances. The way to check is to look in the mirror as you tilt your head forward.

Also, with the head tilted in this position, there is less room to drop the jaw, so its possible that you are making subtle changes in your embouchure favoring a slightly more closed jaw position. When the jaw is in this position, F1 is at its lowest frequency for any given vowel.

The subtle changes in the F1 resonance could be allowing it to be more advantageously aligned with one of the lower harmonics of your voice. When F1 is just above (say, within 50 Hz) of one of these harmonics, the vocal tract is inertive, and that cushions the vocal process, making phonation easier. When a harmonic is just _above_ F1, then the vocal tract is reactive, and the cushioning is not present. Then, it feels more effortful at the level of the larynx.

If you want, I'd be happy to run two examples through spectragraphic analysis, and post for you the acoustic differences in the tone. From that, you'd be able to see which harmonics are being emphasized.

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Chen, sometimes as a session singer, I am called on to do all the parts, and sometimes the low part truly puts me in a man's vocal range. I found that putting my hand on the upper part of my sternum and pressing my chest back (opening the lower ribs) enables me to sing low notes I can't hit any other way. I don't know if it's because I am steadying my breath, opening my throat or telling my brain to resonate my chest, but I do know it works. In live performance it can look like you're coming from your heart :)

Conversely, I find that moving my head forward gives me a "hootier" less buzzy resonance, which I don't like, and which fatigues my voice.

This makes all the difference in the world for my students as well, for live and studio vocals.

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Thanks Judy,

My thinking on processes like these had been that somehow the vocal tract is being more relaxed--thus enabling the lengthening the resonance wavelength, enabling for lower notes. Darrison had, in another forum post, suggested using more support and opening the throat passage to boost bass sounds. This is true to a certain point (based on my limited practice), but I'm still finding out that a too-relaxed chest cavity enables for still lower bass, using primarily resonance rather than power to produce the bass.

My guess was that I had tight throat tension, and somehow by straightening my head, the pull on my throat muscles actually somehow tightened my vocal tract resonance capacity. Also, by straightening my head, I pulled my chest straighter, which may have tightened certain muscles, and thus reduced lower bass resonance. I don't fully understand how this happens.

But, the bottom line remains that somehow, like you, by adjusting my body in non-standard ways, I am able to produce a lower pitch.

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Chen the troat needs to expand and the walls of the throat made rigid in the lowest register. do not however tighten your jaw, while keeping the jaw relaxed focus the notes outward by shaping your lips and keeping them foward. Try to maintain the focal point and edge, but dig the sound up into the head not down into the throat.

also Chen can you be more specific as to the range when you say, low-high etc.

I'm a Tenor, but I sing Tenor, Baritone and Bass roles, however well I may accomplish this The tenor voice still will not have the same properties as a bass voice. I sing down to low C as a tenor it is smother and brighter down there then a bass would be. Basses can with proper training sing tenor lines, however their voice will in general not ring like a tenor voice.

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