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Really high notes on inhale

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forgivendays
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Hello all :)

So I find it really easy to reach really high notes like C6 on an inhale. I'm not sure how this really works but it's basically just breathing in. Like when imitating car breaks sounds as a kid. Is this legit? Are there any singers who do this? It's certainly seems much easier than normal singing.

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Phil Anselmo did some inhaled vocal stuff in some of the Pantera recordings... though... it was an aggressive style... I think what you've uncovered is part of your range.. now. .the trick is how to get the from exhaling? Think about how the tone starts when you inhale... Try singing an F#5-G5 with that kind of onset, and let the voice 'float' up there...notice you have no chest... nothing weighing the tone down..

Typically Bb5-B5 is a good working top note in metal.. though a lot of guys don't sing those... you should be able to...

Have fun!

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reverse phonating highnotes by some reason activates more flageolet thus making highnotes easyer. play around with the feeling you get when you do that and you will be able to do the same on exhale. on that C6 your basicly just using vocalflageolet, my reason for this is cause your C6 sounds very very close to whistlevoice

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I actually wrote to the guy who posted the video. He's s got a whole website, btw ;)

Anyhow, he assured me that he managed to extend the range of his "regular voice" by doing the "reverse phonation" on the inhale.

I decided to give it a shot - will see how it goes ;)

It would be great though to get a feedback from Steven and Robert on this.

I'm just hoping that exercise is legit ;)

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Brett Manning also talks about how he used inward phonation to finally get to his whistle voice. Seems like a good way to approach it. I think part of it is you don't get the reflexive tightening of the larynx from when you squeeze the diaphragm. The tricky part is keeping that when you switch to exhale. I still haven't gotten to C6 and above.

I was surprised how loud inward singing is, since the air pulses through the vocal cords are going down into the lungs. I guess the resonation still goes upwards somehow?

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Brett Manning also talks about how he used inward phonation to finally get to his whistle voice. Seems like a good way to approach it. I think part of it is you don't get the reflexive tightening of the larynx from when you squeeze the diaphragm. The tricky part is keeping that when you switch to exhale. I still haven't gotten to C6 and above.

I was surprised how loud inward singing is, since the air pulses through the vocal cords are going down into the lungs. I guess the resonation still goes upwards somehow?

Yeah, I saw a SS video on that, and it taught me to do the same as you described. I've gotten up to c6 on inhaling, and it was so loud and easy. It makes me ask myself what am I doing wrong that makes my volume in exhaled singing less, probably strain or unnecessary tightening.

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To me it has a lot to do with the soft palate and the back of the tongue. If I don't set them correctly I get a very creaky sound.

@chillwynston: Haha that's funny I love the D. It's true because I can sustain a long inward high note then get back to normal singing without taking a breath.

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I actually wrote to the guy who posted the video. He's s got a whole website, btw ;)

Anyhow, he assured me that he managed to extend the range of his "regular voice" by doing the "reverse phonation" on the inhale.

I decided to give it a shot - will see how it goes ;)

It would be great though to get a feedback from Steven and Robert on this.

I'm just hoping that exercise is legit ;)

PopVlad: Because this kind of phonation uses many muscles in a manner that is not so influenced by speech or other habitual tensions, it may be a way to sidestep those tensions while adduction and pitch-controlling muscles come into play. If that helps the vocalist to 'find' the thin-fold phonation coordination, its probably ok, especially if on the air reversal (to outward flow) the mental approach to the adduction used inwardly can be sustained.

But, it does not solve the issue of reflexive tensions that may occur during normal phonation. The singer still has to deal with those if present.

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