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The soul of rocknroll

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Matt
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seems like just you and me :P

I simply marvel at the control he's got here in managing so well, so many, tiny little blues inflections all the way through. he hits either a D and could even be an E, depending on whatever key they're playing in, in several bootleg videos of the same tune.

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seems like just you and me :P

I simply marvel at the control he's got here in managing so well, so many, tiny little blues inflections all the way through. he hits either a D and could even be an E, depending on whatever key they're playing in, in several bootleg videos of the same tune.

well then matt let's educate these younger guys...lol!!!!

a big influence on lou gramm.

listen for the monsterous c5 on "rock"

one of my all-time favorites, this one really touches me...the part "don't forsake me cause i love you" oh man...he bleeds

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Als8FTtA7ys&feature=related

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Great post

I have just had the pleasure of having watched him in concert; the jury is in: he was outstanding. I seriously think that he has become better at interpreting his own material - what a gift that is. Great mic technique by the master btw. Heavenly vocals,

Tony

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Lou Gramm, Paul Rodgers - guys like that - I think they all do something similar: They bridge to head voice LATE. That means they sing a bit LOUDER than other singers (increasing volume raises the passagio), but of course with a relaxed throat - otherwise they couldn't last a single concert. I'm not saying it's BETTER to bridge late, but if you bridge early and f.ex. add a bit of rasp, you'll probably get a sound that's closer to Axl Rose and Brian Johnson. For some people, of course, that's JUST want they want.

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Lou Gramm, Paul Rodgers - guys like that - I think they all do something similar: They bridge to head voice LATE. That means they sing a bit LOUDER than other singers (increasing volume raises the passagio), but of course with a relaxed throat - otherwise they couldn't last a single concert. I'm not saying it's BETTER to bridge late, but if you bridge early and f.ex. add a bit of rasp, you'll probably get a sound that's closer to Axl Rose and Brian Johnson. For some people, of course, that's JUST want they want.

you are absolutely right, and they have two other blatant features...they both have very muscular necks.

the thing that i'm so convinced of is they also have to have extreme fold closure/compression strength. if you try singing like gramm the first thing you notice is you simply don't have the folds built up enough to resist the breath pressure to a. hit the high notes and b. keep the folds from blowing apart. he sings with this punch, this kick.....that alone makes it even harder to stay compressed.

even if you lower the key, almost every one of his songs are a bitch to sing.

now when you see him after his brain tumor, you begin to realize just how much he lost.

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I'm not sure if it's really that insanly hard to HIT those notes - even with power - even with rasp on top of that - but to control them well within a song and a concert and a tour - that's hard.

no, i wouldn't say insanely hard, but i personally think they make it look easier than it actually is...

i've analized lou gramm so many times....

forget the range...lou's a "punchy" singer...a lot of "stacattoish" notes....and a lot of restrain, a lot of power.

his vocals have a pretty serious punch to them.....when i think of punch, i think of impact of some sort......he's either got to subdue the punch of his breath to keep from blowing the folds wide open, or have the fold strength to keep them together to resist to pressure of his breath ......or both..... way above average.

i can't see any other way. anybody have any other theories?

but you can hear how his voice developed and strenthened even further as the years went on.

listen to the difference in both vocals...first 85, then in 93:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=neRo4nXUwM4

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no, i wouldn't say insanely hard, but i personally think they make it look easier than it actually is...

I think they make it look easier than it is because it's counter productive to clench the muscles in your face and throat too much when singing. If they'd tense too much in their faces, they wouldn't be able to sing like that - not for long, at least.

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i totally agree, totally, but like i said, there is coordination and strength developed to keep the folds adducted under the breath pressure generated.

steve has always taught us if too much breath pressure builds up it can blow the folds apart...right? he talks about the balance needed between breath pressure and fold closure.

but here's lou gramm punching out these extreme statacco powernotes without blowing the folds apart. so what's the real secret?

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