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Just learned how to enter headvoice - I think. (Sample)

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rofleren
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Thanks to Tony's video here, I've found the way to enter "headvoice".

Here is a sample of me trying to sing in head voice. I just need to know, is this what people call headvoice. Need to have it confirmed :) Also; the last sound in the clip is in falsetto - Now that I can enter (mabye) headvoice, I cannot see how it is possible to go beyond D5 at max without entering falsetto. Ah well, not really that I'm gonna focus on anyways. Now I want to be able to own in my new register.

www.rofleren.dk/TMVF/head.mp3 I am very shaky in this register :P

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That's kind of mixed.. it's not pure head voice... it's a bit pressed, but it's a cool sound... It sounds like the back of your tongue is tense.. and the tone falls back as you ascend the scale.. more forward, lighter, softer...

try to mimic the 'freedom' and relaxed production of this guy.. not that it's going to be your goal singing metal.. but.. it will allow you to open up your top voice..

when in doubt about the head voice, and all that... countertenors. lol.. they're masters of head voice...

notice the resonance and freedom of production...

here's an even more fascinating example..

never worry about the weight of the sound... only about the purity of the pitch...

You have a nice voice.... be careful and have fun.

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Thanks to Tony's video here, I've found the way to enter "headvoice".

Here is a sample of me trying to sing in head voice. I just need to know, is this what people call headvoice. Need to have it confirmed :) Also; the last sound in the clip is in falsetto - Now that I can enter (mabye) headvoice, I cannot see how it is possible to go beyond D5 at max without entering falsetto. Ah well, not really that I'm gonna focus on anyways. Now I want to be able to own in my new register.

www.rofleren.dk/TMVF/head.mp3 I am very shaky in this register :P

the thing you need to understand about the head register depending on so many variables, i. e., the vowel, the resonance, formant alignment, development, training, mental attitude, range, strength, oh so many variables, a head register tone can be virtually indistinguishable froma chest register tone. the power and range can be developed but falsetto (in my opinion) is not the best route to take.

listen to one of my all-time favorite rock singers hit a seriously full voiced d5....no falsetto on these notes. i personally think some singers will themselves these notes...

listen from 3:40 to the end

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Thanks! :)

@ aldertate

Aren't countertenors singing in falsetto?

@ VIDEOHERE

I'm looking forward to the day where I can sing like like that!

The last part with the falsetto was just for fun mainly. I'm not intending to train my falsetto at this point at all.

But if we're talking about chest, middle/mix and head. The clip which in I sung, would classify as head, right? I've never been able to hit that high notes before, without falsetto. But now I can. I thought that this had to be "headvoice" then :)

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Thanks! :)

@ aldertate

Aren't countertenors singing in falsetto?

@ VIDEOHERE

I'm looking forward to the day where I can sing like like that!

The last part with the falsetto was just for fun mainly. I'm not intending to train my falsetto at this point at all.

But if we're talking about chest, middle/mix and head. The clip which in I sung, would classify as head, right? I've never been able to hit that high notes before, without falsetto. But now I can. I thought that this had to be "headvoice" then :)

it's very confusing head voice and falsetto...it shouldn't be, but it is, and has been for years, and will continue to be.

the best way to help you i think is when you singing a high note, don't stress it, use this simple checklist:

are you singing with an open glottis? (are your vocal folds apart while phonating?)

does that phonation expell breath rather quickly?

is it difficult to increase volume or power?

does the phonation lack any fold compression?

generally speaking, if you answered ''yes" to any of these, you are phonating in falsetto.

now when you attempt to sing high notes in full voice you must adduct (bring the vocal folds together). the higher you go the more the voice wants to resist initially because you haven't developed the required coordination and strength to keep the folds together the higher the pitch. why do need to keep them together? because if you don't you will either crack or default into falsetto.

this i refuse to b.s. anyone....if you are desirous of building the voice to sing above g4 to c5 (or higher) in an adducted full voice with pitch, resonance and intensity you are going to have to dilligently work at it. there are no shortcuts.

you or i can sing an airy falsetto up and down and all around till the cows come home, but this is not the way to build those kind of vocals you just heard. it takes years.

and it takes work...but! it can happen and it will happen if you apply yourself.

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it may take years, but I think it may take years of just unconscious playing about for fun as well. Bonnet said he became a high singer just because the songs he copied and sang as a kid were often sung by women:

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it may take years, but I think it may take years of just unconscious playing about for fun as well. Bonnet said he became a high singer just because the songs he copied and sang as a kid were often sung by women:

totally agree matt...there's a myriad of ways to improve the voice...

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I often try to mimic songs like:

I am able to sing a powerfull D5 like him, but it sounds too strainy, shaky and just plain bad when I try.

I don't believe the best way (for me) is just to sing songs sung high pitched.

The problem with just trying to sing songs sung by tenors when you're baritone, that a lot in the start just push or use falsetto. OR NOW, as I would do, "shout" in some kind of headvoice.

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To me it sounds like an excellent start! I'm a about the same stage in my vocal developement having just learned to cry myself into a head voice that isn't falsetto (after seeing the same video from Tony actually :)). I wouldn't worry about D5 yet. If your particular kind of baritone is anything like mine there's plenty of work to do around G4 and up. Besides a D5 will be a challenge to anyone who isn't a soprano. Tenors have to work to get there too.

The nifty thing about head voice for me is that I can now do notes in the E4-G4 range sounding almost like they would pulling chest but reaching them is much easier and more reliable. Above that my head voice sounds pretty much like a weak James LaBrie (old lady wails with heavy vowel modification to the point of everything becoming [eh] and [ey]).

Keep working and I'd be happy to follow your progress!

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@JensTP

Sounds cool, we will follow each other then! :)

Do you sometimes break around the G4, if you try to sing with that cry/heady voice? I am very new to the cry, so my vocal folds tend to shake a little around G4-A4, and then it suddenly becomes somewhat easier. But I'm sure that will go away with some work :)!

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@JensTP

Sounds cool, we will follow each other then! :)

Do you sometimes break around the G4, if you try to sing with that cry/heady voice? I am very new to the cry, so my vocal folds tend to shake a little around G4-A4, and then it suddenly becomes somewhat easier. But I'm sure that will go away with some work :)!

After two weeks I'd say the cracking, breaking and flipping into falsetto stopped in low head voice up to about A4. It's still somewhat unstable above that. The /i/ vowel (as in 'see') is a killer though. I probably need to work a lot more on breath support to get that working even at F4.

A good exercise for me has been to back off the power, feel the note resonate with the minimum amount of effort and then gradually add power again. That seems to let the voice find the path of least resistance and remove strain. My throat and jaw are still not nearly as relaxed as they should be, but it's slowly getting easier.

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More confusion about head voice vs falsetto? :/

People tend to make this more confusing than it is, and try to build head voice up to be this secret register when it's not. Here's the difference between the two:

In falsetto the cords do not touch, and it is impossible to sustain note for more than 20-25 seconds since the air escapes too quickly. Head voice can also do sharp staccato sounds, whereas falsetto cannot.

Singing in falsetto feels more like breathing out through the mouth rather than actual vocalizations.

Falsetto is also not a register, because it can be done throughout the entire range of the voice by simply letting the air blow past the cords with no closure.

Most people sing in head voice over falsetto naturally. Lack of a head voice could be a sign of a vocal injury.

Many singers are often misled to believe that head voice is some magical register that will give them the vocal power they want. A good head voice is not found, but rather developed.

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More confusion about head voice vs falsetto? :/

People tend to make this more confusing than it is, and try to build head voice up to be this secret register when it's not. Here's the difference between the two:

In falsetto the cords do not touch, and it is impossible to sustain note for more than 20-25 seconds since the air escapes too quickly. Head voice can also do sharp staccato sounds, whereas falsetto cannot.

Singing in falsetto feels more like breathing out through the mouth rather than actual vocalizations.

Falsetto is also not a register, because it can be done throughout the entire range of the voice by simply letting the air blow past the cords with no closure.

Most people sing in head voice over falsetto naturally. Lack of a head voice could be a sign of a vocal injury.

Many singers are often misled to believe that head voice is some magical register that will give them the vocal power they want. A good head voice is not found, but rather developed.

nice post evil.......

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