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Help - which techniques/stylistic effects does this guy use ?

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djemass
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Hello everyone,

I would need your help.

I am currently trying to develop my skills in modern singing (through 4 pillars method and Raise your voice), and

after googling a little, I found this video taken from a Polish TV show which blasted me...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GShXQrTdeYE

The guy is called mateusz Zielko, and he covered Queen "Who wants to live forever".

I think his IMHO voice is really... incredible ! You know it is like after having watching : "This is what I want to do !"

His highest notes sound very Freddy Mercury like, very powerful + creamy and rock at the same time (with some operatic elements I guess).

I particularly love the moment "Who dares to love forever... Oohhhhh ... when love must die"

His range is perhaps not so extended in the upper range (he uses falsetto at some points), but the result is ... Wow

Could anyone help me on the techniques he uses and how to achieve this kind of result ?

Are they simply the same techniques as Robert Lunte or Jaime Vendera teach but with specific stylistic elements ? I mean I love Steve Perry and Geoff Tate, but for me this is not the style of singing I would like to do, and this why I prefer James Labrie over them (it is just a matter of taste). If this guy could take some coaching with Robert or Jaime, he could be really IMHO one of the best vocalists I could have seen.

Thank you for your help - this forum ROCKS !!

Gerald

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here's a perfect example of what you can achieve with a lot of hard work. that singer's got a lot of skill and technique and a seriously developed voice with a nicely resonating, well supported higher register. now what we don't know for sure is just how loud he is, but my guess is he is quite loud and powerful.

i heard no falsetto, just a little thining of his adducted head tones. you are just starting out?

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Hi

Oh yes I am beginning...

I always fixed myself great challenges. For guitar steve vai and other shredders. now it is accomplished quite well:cool:

For singing, i am beginner. I have the range but nothing more...

It is the beginning of a new journey.

Can these results be achieved via coaching with robert lunte for example who seems more spzcialized in more stuff a la steve perry ?

KR

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absolutely rob can, but my very latest thinking about singing like this is you have to will it in yourself. rob will teach you technique and skill and injury avoidence, but if you are going after songs like this, you are going to have to work hard and feel your way into that song. the song requires vocal dexterity and strength.

sorry, but i like to be honest about this stuff, so you don't waste your time and money.

guys like freddy mercury are tough voices because they were strong and very flexible. he's considered one of the greatest rock singers of all time and one of my all-time favorites.

he had this incredible ability to sound raspy and intense one minute and like an angel the next.....one of my favorites!!!

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djemass:

Define your goal. What do you want to do?

The guy in the contest is singing in head voice, which is a classical thing, "gritty" sounds aside. Of the programs out there, Lunte is the only one that I have seen (maybe I have not seen enough) that gives proper attention to head voice. And I know many here will disagree with me and I simply could not care less. The only way to sing with power for decades is to learn to sing in head voice, almost all the time, if not all the time. If you really want to hear the root of a good head voice and what it can do, listen or youtube search stuff from the singer Bjorling. Yes, it's opera but the principles are the same.

James Labrie studied and trained as an opera singer, as well. But old school, more traditional than say, Pavarotti in his later years.

Also, this singer did not use falsetto and I think that whatever you thought was "falsetto" was a misinterpretation on your part. However, there were times that Freddie Mercury did use falsetto, but not in this song. By the way, a high, pure headtone is not "falsetto."

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Hello

Thank you very much for your comments. In fact about the falsetto thing i thought he only used it once at the end of the song on the word LOVE in "and we can LOVE forever"

It is important for me to have well defined clear goals even if during my learning journey they will probably change slightly.

This enhances my motivation.

Videohere dont worry I am not offended at all ;) I listen to wise advices carefully and try to apply them.

Cheers

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djemass:

Define your goal. What do you want to do?

The guy in the contest is singing in head voice, which is a classical thing, "gritty" sounds aside. Of the programs out there, Lunte is the only one that I have seen (maybe I have not seen enough) that gives proper attention to head voice. And I know many here will disagree with me and I simply could not care less. The only way to sing with power for decades is to learn to sing in head voice, almost all the time, if not all the time. If you really want to hear the root of a good head voice and what it can do, listen or youtube search stuff from the singer Bjorling. Yes, it's opera but the principles are the same.

James Labrie studied and trained as an opera singer, as well. But old school, more traditional than say, Pavarotti in his later years.

Also, this singer did not use falsetto and I think that whatever you thought was "falsetto" was a misinterpretation on your part. However, there were times that Freddie Mercury did use falsetto, but not in this song. By the way, a high, pure headtone is not "falsetto."

Hi Ron,

Thank you very much for the tips. The idea of only staying in Head Voice is a very seducing approach. The clip of Bjorling made me understand a lot of things quickly, thank you ! I can hear the same kind of resonation between both guys.

I think he uses the same techniques for resonation but adds more grit in his voice, right ? For Mateusz Ziolko, the mix of both worlds (opera + modern techniques like grit) is great

Cheers

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Yeah, I meant to add that if you searched youtube for Bjorling singing "Ingemisco," that would be a good example of what I am talking about.

Anyway, Lunte's system will get you into head voice and even just the notion of bridging early is going to help and you may find that once you are comfortable with headvoice, you will just stay there. And he also teaches how to do headvoice and have some beefy tone to it. For it is an auditory illusion. Any and all volume you have, regardless of what anyone else ever says, comes from resonance. Always has, always will be. To think anything else is to not understand science. For the vocal folds do not regulate volume and are incapable of doing so. They either vibrate or they don't. And the breath pressure and/or velocity do not create or control volume and never will be able to do so. Increasing tension on the folds or trying to adduct them harder does not increase volume and never will. It is a physical impossibility. What creates the frequency is how fast the folds are opening and closing and to some extent, how much of the fold is vibrating. Using less of the folds' total mass allows faster opening and closing. Where does the volume come from?

Resonance. In the right size of space, the note doubles back or stacked upon itself, creating a doubling of amplitude, or height of the waveform. Which creates a logarithmic increase in volume. For it is amplitude that makes volume. How do you get that amplitude increase? By resonating so that the waveform doubled upon itself.

Where are the resonating spaces for most notes low to high but especially anything beyond the lowest, weakest tones? In the head. I don't say that as a preference for high, light singing. Or from being a tenor. It's a fact of physics, a fact of anatomy.

Learning to sing in headvoice negates the need for falsetto, except as a desired emotional effect by means of tone.

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And I know many here will disagree with me and I simply could not care less. The only way to sing with power for decades is to learn to sing in head voice, almost all the time, if not all the time.

ron, when you say sing in head voice all the time at what note/notes would you say it's time to bring in the chest register?

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