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New Member and Question About The Larynx

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bdam123
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Hi everyone, new here. Looking to improve my singing and learn as much as I can.

My first question has to do with lowering my larynx.

I'm slightly confused on how I should be dealing with the mechanics of my larynx. I know that learning to lower it will help me improve my tone but I also know that I should be keeping it neutral to sound as natural as possible. My dilemma is that I've found that I have to take a lot of effort into lowering it to achieve the tone I want but when I do so it feels totally unnatural.

While I'm singing like this it sounds like I'm being extra breathy (it feels breathy too) and way too deep but when I listen back to a recording its the best and most natural tone I've heard from myself.

Now if i were to sing and keep my larynx where it feels natural my tone becomes thin and its just not something that I like the sound of.

Can someone help guide me in the right direction. Will my approach at achieving the tone I want become more natural to me the more I practice or will I always feel like I'm doing something unnatural to achieve a sound that I think people would like to hear?

Thanks to anyone who can help.

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Hey

Are you following a particular program? To make this short and simple - There is no hard and fast rule saying that the larynx HAS to be kept low. In stead, think of it this way - let the larynx move to a position that feels comfortable when you're singing, whether its high or low. Do not force it to do anything. Also, focus on exercises that will help you open your throat and prevent and constrictions from the muscles around the larynx. A lot of programs advise keeping the larynx comfortably low to ensure that it doesnt constrict the sound in any way. So once you get familiar with an "open" feeling in the throat, the larynx can go up if needed. If you want more details, use the search tab - there are about a hundred threads which discuss this!!

Cant say anything about the tone you want to achieve since it is subjective. Maybe if you post an audio clip it would help?

My advice would be to pick up a tested program like 4 pillars, CVT, Ken Tamplin etc. .and stick with it for a year. Also, if finances allow it, take classes with the instructors (at least initially) to get a hang of how to do the exercises correctly, and understand vocal sound production.

Cheers, and Happy Singing.

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Hi everyone, new here. Looking to improve my singing and learn as much as I can.

My first question has to do with lowering my larynx.

I'm slightly confused on how I should be dealing with the mechanics of my larynx. I know that learning to lower it will help me improve my tone but I also know that I should be keeping it neutral to sound as natural as possible. My dilemma is that I've found that I have to take a lot of effort into lowering it to achieve the tone I want but when I do so it feels totally unnatural.

While I'm singing like this it sounds like I'm being extra breathy (it feels breathy too) and way too deep but when I listen back to a recording its the best and most natural tone I've heard from myself.

Now if i were to sing and keep my larynx where it feels natural my tone becomes thin and its just not something that I like the sound of.

Can someone help guide me in the right direction. Will my approach at achieving the tone I want become more natural to me the more I practice or will I always feel like I'm doing something unnatural to achieve a sound that I think people would like to hear?

Thanks to anyone who can help.

great advice from bigfoot, i'd like to add that laryngeal stability/control does need to be developed and that again takes time. more than worrying about it being too low, you need to be able to control it from rising too high. i'm an advocate of singing with a neutral larynx position for most styles of contemporary music.

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Hey guys thanks for the replies.

I just want my singing to feel natural. When I sing with my larynx in a position where I feel like I'm not trying I feel like I'm projecting my best but listening back I'm not really satisfied with the tone. My clarity takes a hit of breathiness when I lower my larynx but it is closer to the tone I want. I'm really looking to take the tone of my lower larynx and fuse it with the projection and clarity of my neutral larynx.

Will this come with time and practice? I'm jut hoping I get to the point where my lower larynx is what feels neutral.

Thanks again. Anyone else?

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The length of your vocal tract affects the resonance. A longer tract amplifies the "lows" more giving you a "darker" tone. Think of the length of a trombone verses a flute. You can adjust the length of your vocal tract by changing the larynx position. A lower larynx will lengthen the tract which will darken the tone. It's fine to do that unless you are introducing constriction or unnecessary tension. It is also normal to lower the larynx when going low in your range as it will help the resonance of the lower notes. At the opposite end of the range, for singing really high you want the CT muscle to start stretching the folds while tilting the apparatus. You may have to let your larynx go higher to allow the tilt to occur.

The fact that you are getting a breathy tone makes me think that you are not fully adducted, or you are not vibrating your folds as deeply as normal. That would account for the loss of clarity (overtones). My recommendation is to make sure you are fully adducted - rich chest voice, while your larynx is at a neutral position. Then lower the larynx just a little, and keep that rich chest voice intact. You just don't want to lose that. You need to carry those "deep fold" vibrations with you as you lower your larynx.

Personally, I leave my larynx at a neutral position and only lower it when going low in my range.

(I am not a voice teacher so take my advice with a grain of salt!)

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And I just want t ad to guitartrek's great advise; as you go lower, it helps to add a little more twang. That makes it easier to keep the folds adducted and use less effort to keep that rich deep fold phonation.

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