Jump to content

broadway bob?

Rate this topic


VideoHere
 Share

Recommended Posts

well, i'm in another vocal show and they have asked me to learn "gethsemane."

this will be my first ever broadway tune. man, this is a stretch for me...but i'm so siked on doing it because it's so emotion-laden.

has anyone any advice or tips?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey, Bob. Thats' one of "my" songs. The low part is easy and relaxed, a little more relaxed than when you normally speak. In fact, I think, you might find it more difficult to keep the low part soft than how you sing the higher parts. The higher parts are focused and you will feel it behind your eyes. The middle parts a bit Lou Gramm-ish, if I may say so. The style you are used to singing.

I find the most important thing is sub-text. What does the song mean to you? For that is what will come through. I have seen a performance of meekness. I have seen a performance of defiance, similar to my own. I've seen people sing it all high. Some who mix low with high. I've seen Sebastian Bach, whom I normally like in everything he does butcher with "screaming." Your breath management will change for the different parts. Almost spoken on the low parts to solid intensity on the high parts. At least, that is how I have viewed how I do the song. Your milage may vary. And I would be very excited on hearing a recording of it but I know I will grow a gray hair waiting for that.

:D

In any case, I know you will knock it out of the park.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey, Bob. Thats' one of "my" songs. The low part is easy and relaxed, a little more relaxed than when you normally speak. In fact, I think, you might find it more difficult to keep the low part soft than how you sing the higher parts. The higher parts are focused and you will feel it behind your eyes. The middle parts a bit Lou Gramm-ish, if I may say so. The style you are used to singing.

I find the most important thing is sub-text. What does the song mean to you? For that is what will come through. I have seen a performance of meekness. I have seen a performance of defiance, similar to my own. I've seen people sing it all high. Some who mix low with high. I've seen Sebastian Bach, whom I normally like in everything he does butcher with "screaming." Your breath management will change for the different parts. Almost spoken on the low parts to solid intensity on the high parts. At least, that is how I have viewed how I do the song. Your milage may vary. And I would be very excited on hearing a recording of it but I know I will grow a gray hair waiting for that.

:D

In any case, I know you will knock it out of the park.

thanks ron, there's a lot of room for interpretation and phrasing choices. i really excited about it. i can get a little breather from the high notes (except the heady, screamy g5) in the middle?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends on which performance you have seen. Personally, I always banked off the original screen performance of Ted Neeley. That is what I grew up watching, it's what I know.

Here's a more current performance from 2006. By the way, he's a bit older than you are, which is not a lot older than I am.

God, this is so inspiring to me. And not just because of the libretto. I am on the highway to Hell because I do not accept the sacrifice of the Innocent. This is inspiring because, scaring the hell out of 70, he is still nailing the Bb5 like he owns it, which he does. Look at the reactions of the cast members, most of whom are young enough to be his grandchildren. And they know they are in the presence of greatness, and I don't mean range. I mean expressiveness. Neeley does so well at this role, which he has held for decades, because he lives in that role. Which may be beyond the scope of your contest or production. But I believe, sing it like you mean it. Sing it as if Robert B is Jesus Christ, confrontating his own fate and trying to understand what it means to Him, as well as to the rest of the world. If you listen to this performance, it can help you understand mine.

I saw an interview with Neeley, not too long after this performance. Humility is the part of him that shows through. He describes himself as a drummer from west Texas who could hit some high notes. And it has moved him and strengthened his faith in God by what his role and performance has meant to so many others. Not to mention that he's got some serious singing chops, as well.

Anyway, again, I am glad you are taking this on and I want to hear your version of this. Even if I have to somehow arrange travel to New York and grab you by the lapels and "make you" sing for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i'm looking forward to it, but i am so friggin plauged with phelgm lately i'm so pissed off. no doctor seems to be able to help....i tried maximum strength mucinex (today), claritin d, (three days now) plus my everyday zantac 150, but i still have phegm. i can't tell if it's reflux or chest congestion!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of the people I know, you, Robert, have the "voice" that can do this. Do your exercises and work-outs, etc. But when you have the finer points of the song nailed down, let go. For 9 minutes, you are Jeshua al Christus, alone, in the Garden at Gethsemane, realizing your fate and destiny. You will leave people saying "Oh, my God ..." whether they go to church or practice a religion, or not. A person that can emote through "A change is going to come" and bring out the meaning of "Black Hole Sun" can do this.

Phlegm is a temporary thing. Rockonwhichyabadself.

If you can post a recording of this, then, perhaps, to fit next to it, I can do Judas Iscariot. "On Thursday night, you'll find him where you want him. Far from the crowds in the garden of Gethsemane ..." And then the baritones and basses can join in, "Well done, Judas ....Good ole Judas ....Poor ole Judas ..."

I can't remember how many times I sang the entire soundtrack.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

well, here's moi with my first attempt at "gethsemane" phlegm issues, rasp and all....actually i did "wicked game" as well.

because you asked for it (and only because you asked for it) ....lol!!!!! hey, i keep tryin'.....

http://www.idolatteddys.com/Video/Week%206/Idol%20at%20Teddys%20Bob%20Buttinellii%20Week%206.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I knew you could do it, Bob. That was the performance I was expecting and knew you could do. The only frustrating thing is my slow computer. That website would only spool about 5 seconds at at time. To hear it with continuity, it would have been easier with dropbox of box.net. But, at least I got to SEE you perform it, not just hear it.

And I totally get the timid standpoint you phrased it from. All the emotion came through. Well done.

Honestly, I was a bit surprised, after hearing your speaking voice with that NYC accent (do I hear a bit of the Bronx when you speak?) You were able to go light when needed. And pour on the coals, when needed.

Now, let me be an ass and ask another question. The rasp that you get, here and there. It is an extension of your natural voice or did you "dial in some effect"? Was it a matter of relaxing off of a focused note?

(bad ron, bad ron ....)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bob's from the Bronx?

I'm in Brooklyn, yo. Word up.

Wow, that was awesome!

I liked Wicked Game better. That was great!! I like how you were slow dancing with the mic stand, haha :)

Great job, Bob.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure that's what steve fraser, rob lunte and those folks call a G4, because men read down an octave in like fakebooks and stuff like that. Someone feel free to correct me, but that's the way I was taught pitching in class a while back. A G5 would be a way high al green kind of thing... same pitch at the 15th fret on the high E string on a guitar, if that helps.

15th fret on the high E string on a guitar is indeed a G5, which was the note Bob hit =) men read an octave down if there's a small 8 underneath the clef, usually used when a male is singing on the treble clef.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh my bad, we're talking about the "why" after the "have to know my love" section? That's a g5 for sure, but I think he referred to the "die" after "watch me die" as a g5 in another thread, maybe mistakenly. So we're all on the same page, this is someone singing a G5. Shitty page, but it'll get the job done. http://www.4shared.com/audio/PIHoXAOP/G5_Full_Voice_High_Note.html

The note in that clip is an A5 and moved to a Bb5 occasionally.

2:58 - "WHY" (long sustained note) G5 should I "DIE" G4

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I knew you could do it, Bob. That was the performance I was expecting and knew you could do. The only frustrating thing is my slow computer. That website would only spool about 5 seconds at at time. To hear it with continuity, it would have been easier with dropbox of box.net. But, at least I got to SEE you perform it, not just hear it.

And I totally get the timid standpoint you phrased it from. All the emotion came through. Well done.

Honestly, I was a bit surprised, after hearing your speaking voice with that NYC accent (do I hear a bit of the Bronx when you speak?) You were able to go light when needed. And pour on the coals, when needed.

Now, let me be an ass and ask another question. The rasp that you get, here and there. It is an extension of your natural voice or did you "dial in some effect"? Was it a matter of relaxing off of a focused note?

(bad ron, bad ron ....)

thanks folks, "another work in progress".....

ron, i did use an effect....it's called "burdened by f$%king phlegm" .....lol!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...