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Noob question with difficulties in terminology

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aeternusnoctis
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Got the head voice down. While doing octave slides I slam into a wall and let's say an E5 is just impossible. I feel as though there is a second "shift" or "bridge" I'm not comprehending how to do to slip into that extreme range. I know this is vague but if anyone has the slightest idea what I'm getting at I'd appreciate the help.

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Generally passaggi fall in the same general area. For example, in the tenor voice, there is usually a bridge or shift around the region of E4 to about F#4, depending on the person and the vowel. And then again, around D5, if I had to pick a spot.

My solution, which has taken quite a beating lately, is to start in head voice down low, or at least bridge into it a D4 or E4 and stay there. And many think I am sounding wrong (I can't help having a light, ringing voice.) But one can have chesty sounds as long as it is head voice controls controlling everything.

But, essentially, as you go higher, think of the voice as lighter while upping your game on the breath. The volume of air escaping your mouth is less but the pressure on the folds is more consistent, even though, though scopes and such, less of the folds are involved in the sound creation.

Personally, I'm not thinking of transition until around A4. By C5, I should be fully in head voice, if i was not, already. Anything past that, to my highest note, Bb5, feels like head voice, regardless of what it sounds like to others, or even to myself.

Going the other direction, I have maintained a head voice feeling down as low as E3. Notes below that are lower in volume and feel more like "chest" to me.

Your milage may vary.

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I had a similar experience at about the same point. As you go higher your folds need to continue to thin out, and it is natural to "pull" thicker folds up to a point where it becomes a "speed bump" (similar to pulling chest but a lot higher). What helped me is trying to think of going to a smaller place. Let it get small and light. You will need to be relaxed to do this. Once you can do it really light you can build strength over time but it starts lighter.

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What Geno said. Amen.

And it is probably a better description of what I mean when I say that a high note is a small note. And people often take that wrong way. Small, as in terms of wavelength. But resonated properly, it is just as loud and "belty" as anything else.

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I am having difficulties relaxing. Getting in that range feels... Tight? Strenuous maybe. Cutting back air a touch gives me an extra whole step or so. I guess another thing I'm wondering is that if there's a *click* I can do this now and have the better part of an octave to play with or is it a gradual thing where I discover an extra half step every few days or so?

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I know exactly where you are at. There may be a slight muscle building going on, and mostly it is finding the right coordination between the CT and TA muscles up there. You've got to let go - just a tiny bit - of the TA muscle and let CT be slightly more dominant. That's what is going on in your larynx. (later your going to want to add more of the TA muscle back in so that your high notes sound like chest voice, but start light)

Once you find this coordination - you will be able to go more than a few notes higher - but - You've got to be a little careful. There is muscle building going on at first. When I first found my way up there I spent too much time singing really high which required a trip to the ENT and some vocal rest (for weeks). I mention that so you don't make the same mistakes I did.

A recommended approach to acheiving higher notes is to try for a higher note - once per day. Once you reach it, don't go back to that note until the next day. Don't push yourself though - if the next day it ain't happening, leave it alone until the next day. Just listen to your body.

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