Jump to content

2nd Break. How to get rid of it?

Rate this topic


joshual
 Share

Recommended Posts

hi coaches & singers,

Just a simple question. I can sing to A before high C without real problem ( no pure chest, mix for sure) but i got a passagio that begins on Bb. I can't maintain my sound quality, it becomes more head voice (not falsetto).

For exemple when i'm working on the song To be with you (Mr Big), iwhen it comes the ' let me be the ONE to show you', on the word ONE that is a B i really can't stay with the same sound. It always come thinner.

So what kind of exercice to get rid of that second break?

Thanxs in advance ;-).

ps: sorry for awful language....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the second passaggio is where you enter head voice, so yes there will be some release of vocal weight and tone change at that point. some voices will naturally have a weightier, thicker head voice than others (which often gives more of an illusion of a seamless range) but all head voices regardless of the voice category can be developed and made into a full voice.

work on a lot of the creaky "edge" exercises. this will help with vocal fold adduction coordination. once the folds are able to adduct stronger you will be able to "lean" more into the sound for a fuller tone.

for the part of the song your having trouble with at the moment add a slight creaky moan sound and see if that helps.

the more you sing and practice in this area (if your approaching it right) the stronger it will get.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find that keeping a sense of upward/forward "placement" of the sound as I vocalise through the upper passagio helps a lot - By "placement" I mean a sense that the vibration of the sound is in the "mask" - "ringing" especially in the sinuses and the bony area above the front teeth.

This needs to be reinforced with unfailing breath management, so that there is a consistent flow of breath through the vocal folds - and also the soft palate has to be raised, and the tip of the tongue needs to be behind the lower teeth with the back of the tongue in whatever position it needs to be in to articulate the vowel.

For purposes of practicing, I vocalise on "ee" (Italian "i") as this tends to help with the sense of placement, and also by raising the back of the tongue which tends (for me at least) to make it easier to keep the soft palate raised than, say, the "ah" (Italian "a").

Specific exercises that are useful:

Sirens - starting 7 notes below the break, and moving up through the break on the 8th note. Repeat, each time moving the "base" (low) note up one 1/2 step.

Arpeggios - Do Mi Sol Do Sol Mi Do (1-3-5-8-5-3-1), again starting so that the "8" is the note just above the break, and then readjusting the lower "Do" up by a half step each time.

Simple octave jumps (1-8-1), with same approach to bottom and top notes.

With all of these, the objective is to keep the same sense of forward "ring", raised soft palate, and consistently even breath flow throughout the entire exercise. In fact, the ONLY physical thing that should change is the dropping of the jaw (easily, without forcing or overextending) as needed when singing in the "head" register. Otherwise, the goal is to have all sensations remain absolutely consistent regardless of where in your range you are singing - except that your sense of where things "ring" will get higher in the mask the higher the note is that you're singing (highest notes should feel like the "ringing" is shooting out the top of your cranium).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a simple question. I can sing to A before high C without real problem ( no pure chest, mix for sure) but i got a passagio that begins on Bb. I can't maintain my sound quality, it becomes more head voice (not falsetto).

For exemple when i'm working on the song To be with you (Mr Big), iwhen it comes the ' let me be the ONE to show you', on the word ONE that is a B i really can't stay with the same sound. It always come thinner.

So what kind of exercice to get rid of that second break?

Joshual: Its quite common for Bb to be experienced as a different register in many voices, especially on certain vowels. The reason is the relationship of the vowel resonances with the harmonic structure of the note. I will explain.

When the vowel resonances align with harmonics, singing is more efficient and less effortful at the level of the larynx. For any given region of the voice, there are certain vowels which just 'ring' more (are more resonant), because the harmonics align beneficially. The lower and upper boundaries of these regions of the voice (for any particular vowel) are in somewhat different places based on the geometry of the individual vocal tract.

As one sings upward to the top of a region, a note is reached which is the highest that can be sung maintaining the alignment... i.e., it will be quite resonant. The note immediately above it will not, as the harmonics will have moved out of useful alignment with the vowel resonances. Just for that reason, it will be less full-sounding, thin.

To overcome this effect, very often accomplished singers allow the vowels chosen to modify toward more resonant ones, that is, vowels whose resonance frequencies more closely align with the sung harmonics. For example, in high male voices, (baritones and tenors), the modification is applied at Ab or A by the Bari, and Bb or Bnatural by the tenor, of course with some small variations based on vocal geometry.

To try this yourself, it is not necessary to sing a whole bunch of high notes. You can use the Bb the octave below to play around with some alternatives. Sometimes a _teeny_ change in vowel color can have a big effect. Darkening an /a/ (ah) to a shade of /o/ (oh) can align the resonances well for a Bb. In other situations, _brightening_ an /E/ (eh) to /e/ (ay) will get you what you need.

Also, do not forget to experiment with the short vowels, Ih, Eh, a as in cat, uh as in hut, and oe (as in the English word foot) When singing the Bb below the problem one, sing that series and see which one feels most resonant and is easiest to do. Then, thinking the same vowel, sing the note the octave above. I think you will be surprised how nice it feels and sounds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Break is not a bad thing but it's a lack of understanding your resonance mask. When you lose control of what it's supposed to feel like, or the sensation, you tend to change the voice tone without noticing it and then the larynx slightly lifts (even if it lifts just a little it still makes a huge difference). Try to hum your break and then say humm-ah repeateadly or you could also get into your most comfortable and lowest dopey sound and then hit that breaking note with the same feel. This should help anyone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...