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Hyaluronic Acid for strengthening cords? Found on Dr. Titze's research

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mpropelus
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Excerpt from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10401858

"RESULTS:

The shear properties of hyaluronic acid were relatively close to those of human vocal fold mucosal tissues reported previously. Hyaluronic acid at specific concentrations (0.5%-1%), with or without fibronectin, was found to exhibit viscous shear properties (viscous shear modulus and dynamic viscosity) similar to those of the average male and female vocal fold mucosa."

Upon reading this, I emailed Dr. Titze about it and this is what he said:

"James,

HA is abundant in the vocal folds, but there is as yet * no evidence that ingesting it (orally) will increase the concentration in the vocal folds. It is normally made by local cells in an organ.

Dr. Titze"

*I emphasized the word "yet" purposefully--since it may imply that there is a possibility that a Hyaluronic Acid supplement may be a catalyst for strengthening the vocal cords. What do you think?

-James

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Excerpt from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10401858

Upon reading this, I emailed Dr. Titze about it and this is what he said:

*I emphasized the word "yet" purposefully--since it may imply that there is a possibility that a Hyaluronic Acid supplement may be a catalyst for strengthening the vocal cords. What do you think?

James: The answer to your question is in the results you quoted: 'the Hyaluronic Acid shear properties were relatively close to those of human vocal fold mucosal tissues...' The mucosal tissues are in the cover tissues of the vocal bands, not the muscular layer.

Hyaluronic Acid has shown clinical value in the treatment of joint pain... but you need to know... its not delivered by ingestion, its done by a series of injections directly into the affected tissues, particularly synovial fluid (the lubricant in bone joints) and into the eye during surgical procedures, which is its medically-approved use. WebMD's comment mentions that there is not enough evidence to conclude whether it is safe to take orally.

Scientists do not use the word 'yet' to imply anything, they use it to state the current level of understanding, which in this case, is the absence of evidence to-date... no data yet.

I hope this helps.

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Not only that, but I'm not sure inhaling it would, either. Swallowing would not help at all. The false vocal cords close over when we swallow or hold our breath in a normal fashion, such as when swimming underwater. It seems more likely that we should ingest something that promotes the body's production of this acid. That is, the right nutrition to have what we need in the folds. For example, drinking water all the time to promote systemic hydration, rather than just trying to breathe steam when we sing.

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Not only that, but I'm not sure inhaling it would, either. Swallowing would not help at all. The false vocal cords close over when we swallow or hold our breath in a normal fashion, such as when swimming underwater. It seems more likely that we should ingest something that promotes the body's production of this acid. That is, the right nutrition to have what we need in the folds. For example, drinking water all the time to promote systemic hydration, rather than just trying to breathe steam when we sing.

Very well said. Many of us tend to forget that our daily habits have a strong effect on our voices, and not just what we do during practice time. One glass of water before training definitely won't work better than good hydration 24/7. Same for sleeping patterns and all of that.

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