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Jani Lane has passed away

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Jani Lane, lead singer of Warrant, has passed away. He was 47.

He's had a life of ups and downs. I enjoyed his story of the recording the Cherry Pie album. Originally, the lead song of the album was "Uncle Tom's Cabin" and that was also the name of the album. But the producer hounded him for a "light" song that could compete with Van Halen and Poison. So, he wrote "Cherry Pie in about 20 minutes on his coffee table. Next thing you know, the lead single is "Cherry Pie." The album title is now Cherry Pie. There are a few times he wished he had not written that song.

Warrant was also known for the songs "Down Boys" and "Heaven." They originally thought of themselves as a harder, darker band than the way they were marketed.

http://news.yahoo.com/former-warrant-lead-singer-jani-lane-dies-47-064029198.html

RIP, Jani Lane. You will rock on in heaven.

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I guess I'm one of the few people who is shocked by his death. I grew up with him here in Orlando when he first moved here, and we played with a lot of the same musicians before he got Warrant off the ground. I was a bit younger than him and most of the others, but they were always willing to let me jam with them. He eventually opened up a rock club called "Jani Lane's Sunset Strip" in downtown Orlando. I'd be here all day rambling about the great memories in that place.

I saw him just 9 months ago, and he seemed to be doing great. He slimmed down, and really seemed to be happy. It really hasn't sunk in yet.

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He was like any of us, just trying to do our thing. It scares me a little because he and I were the same age. It's an age when you start to realize your fragility. When I was young, I thought I would live forever. When my first wife passed away, I was no longer afraid of death. Now, I know, death is coming (about 40 years from now, for me, I have seen it in a dream.)

One rumor mill said that he was found with some vodka and some meds. Whether that is true or not, I don't care. For me, he, or any other person, is not defined by whatever weaknesses they had or have. I don't care if he was an alcoholic or not, a drug addict, or not. A sober tea-totaller, or not. He was Jani Lane, a fine talent, who could still sing his stuff 20-something years after it was a hit. He was an entertainer and a human being.

Blessings to him, his family, his friends, notable among them, Brett Michaels, with his own share of life's challenges, and all those who loved his music.

And thank you for sharing what you can, Validar.

The closest I have got to a famous music connection is that I am friends with, through my wife, Ray Wylie Hubbard ("Redneck Mother".) And I had a friend who lived across the street from Bugs Henderson (local Texas legend.)

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There are a few other people from here in O-town who made it big that I grew up with, but I don't really have too many good things to say about them, and I'll leave it at that.

But Jani was the opposite. Everyone here loved him because he always treated fans like family even after making it big. There were many times when Warrant would come back home while on a major tour, and after the last song, he would let the audience know where they would be partying afterwards. (it was generally a place called "The Plus Three", and eventually his own club after it opened) You couldn't have asked for a more fan friendly guy.

As I said, he really seemed to be doing great the last time I saw him. He was filling in for Jack Russell (who was ill at the time) at a Great White show months ago. It's really stunning.

Ray Wylie Hubbard? I think I've heard of him. Did he do the "Screw You, We're From Texas" song?

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Actually Hubbard's biggest song was "Redneck Mothers." He wrote it and it became a monstrous hit for Jerry Jeff Walker. But yeah, he wrote that one, too. Hubbard and Lane could share the same advice.

When you write a song, ask yourself if you can sing that song for the next 30 or 40 years.

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Actually Hubbard's biggest song was "Redneck Mothers." He wrote it and it became a monstrous hit for Jerry Jeff Walker. But yeah, he wrote that one, too. Hubbard and Lane could share the same advice.

When you write a song, ask yourself if you can sing that song for the next 30 or 40 years.

Ah, I thought that was him. I remembered the name because a friend of mine in Dallas posted the "Screw You, We're From Texas" song after a Cowboys game last season on her Facebook page, and I thought it was funny.

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Amen to everyone's contributions. And I think Jani's stint on "Celebrity Fit Club" did him some good. He lost quite a bit of weight and got back down close this "fighting weight." Not that it makes a great singer. But hey, a hard rock singer is part sex symbol. Even with short hair, he was looking good for being middle-aged. I know all about the vanity. my hair is starting to thin up top and front. So, I have to keep it really short to look "neat." That's okay. Next year is my 30 year high school reunion. To put that in perspective, people have been born, grown up, been to college, got married and have had some kids, i.e., a whole new generation, since I graduated high school.

As the old saying goes, "if I had known that I would live this long, I would have taken better care of myself."

How does one get this old? We keep breathing in and out, day after day, like it's a habit, I guess. I know there's a few here older than I am. Bear with my "young'n" ways.

Life is fragile. And I am simply not going to remember Jani in a hotel room, found by whomever. I am going to remember him at the House of Blues, still rocking it, after a few decades. Honestly, I really don't care what his problems might or might have not been. He was a good guy, a gifted singer, and a songwriter with his finger on the pulse of what America wanted to hear. It was neat to learn that he had a songwriting business of his own.

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And Validar, just to let you know how it is that I know Ray Wylie Hubbard. Many moons ago, he and my wife went through the same AA program. Since then, they have been "friends" who see each other whenever he plays somewhere near us and we always get to talk to him between sets. He is one of the most humble and down-to-earth people you will ever meet.

I thnk, from your description, Jani Lane was similar, in that regard. He appreciated the fans that made him his fame and fortune. "Cherry Pie," or not.

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It's good she made a new friend through a challenging experience, and a talented one at that. I checked out a few more videos of his. He has a cool style.

Like anyone else, I appreciate the artists who don't let the business change them at their very core.

It took me forever, but I finally got to meet George Lynch the Sunday before last. He's another that I can say seemed like a genuine, good natured guy. I expected him to focus all of his attention on the women, but he actually spent most of his time after the show talking with guys about guitar, music, and gear.

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It's good she made a new friend through a challenging experience, and a talented one at that. I checked out a few more videos of his. He has a cool style.

Like anyone else, I appreciate the artists who don't let the business change them at their very core.

It took me forever, but I finally got to meet George Lynch the Sunday before last. He's another that I can say seemed like a genuine, good natured guy. I expected him to focus all of his attention on the women, but he actually spent most of his time after the show talking with guys about guitar, music, and gear.

Now, you're just trying to make me envious. Bastard!

George Lynch is one of the most underrated guitarists. He is a genius that has yet to be discovered, in spite of his time in the limelight with Dokken. And you can tell him I said that. From the bottom of my heart. And I take his side over Don. Don can and could be a prima donna. No offense, Don, but you could have backed off the 'tude, now and then.

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He's great. He's the reason I started playing. I bought the "Tooth and Nail" cassette, and the rest is history.

Lynch Mob was in town playing at a friend's club, and I just had to go. I hadn't seen them since 1992, and these days, as we've seen, there's no guarantee you'll catch your favorite performers on their "next tour".

Coincidentally, George was at the grand opening of Jani's club back in 1994, but I was too sick to attend that night.

Oh, and I totally agree about Don. Great singer, but what a diva.

Do you ever go to Austin? I'm sure that city has to be drenched in big acts coming through playing the smaller venues.

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I'd love to go there. I've always heard nothing but great things about it. Another of my favorite guitarists resides there, I believe. (Eric Johnson)

Curse word? "Bastard"?? If that's what you're referring to, I took it totally as jest.

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Eric Johnson. Now, there's a musician's musician. Still doing his stuff, whether he's national, or not.

And thanks for understanding my word in the jesting use of it. A term of endearment, if you will. But, it can be misintrepreted by others.

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