Jump to content

questions to ask ENT doc

Rate this topic


WebAndNet.com
 Share

Recommended Posts

I recently growled too much, suffered from cold, have stuffy nose, and had slight sore throat. Planning to go to ENT doctor. Unable to determine whether the slight irritation I feel in my louder singing is from my back of mouth muscles and tissues or from my vocal cords area.

1. Is there some way of figuring this out?

2. What questions should I ask the doc and what should I ask him to examine, in addition to nodules?

Thanks,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are not providing enough information and miss matching info so lets break it down:

You say you had a cold and stuffiness, that being the case: This may add weight to the voice and stray mucous can cause a tickle at the back or the throat. dry mucous in the sinus or at the base of the folds may also cause some irritation ,but if you are singing correctly that should pass with 24 hours after the cold is gone. Although you might sound congested you should still be able to vocalize without breaks or strain.

Now for the second issue you state you growled too much. This leads me to believe You growled incorrectly or there is a technical issue. If you are growling correctly it should not be irritating anything. If it is STOP IMMEDIATLY SEE AN ENT , get an assessment of the condition of your throat and vocal fold. If needed take a 48 hour break. Then re-examine your technique to see if that is the cause. You may need to use a different approach, such as the one I refer you to in yesterdays post. In general having read your post it seems you are either confused in some areas or at the very least not express youself cleary.

I need more information from you , other then what I've stated above I can't give you any other advice based on what you've provided.

Have you lost your voice after singing? If so stop , this is a sure sign some is going on( not always nodes, but correct it ) before you do get nodes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting posts......I've always been able to sing through colds and never really think about it......a sore throat can be a different matter and if severe I wouldn't sing full stop. Of course I do some vocal care work and keep mucous forming foods etc out. I agree with you Darrison on very good answers. Would mucous loading cause the growl to sound different to usual? I'd be interested to hear any more slants on this subject? :)H

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I recently growled too much, suffered from cold, have stuffy nose, and had slight sore throat. Planning to go to ENT doctor. Unable to determine whether the slight irritation I feel in my louder singing is from my back of mouth muscles and tissues or from my vocal cords area.

1. Is there some way of figuring this out?

2. What questions should I ask the doc and what should I ask him to examine, in addition to nodules?

Thanks,

In response to the initial question, a growling sound arises from a pharyngeal (throat) sound source rather than a glottic (vocal folds) sound source. The discomfort you are feeling in your throat may be due to the growling or the cold or a combination of the two. As you are feeling under the weather with discomfort while singing, it would be worth seeing your ENT physician and allowing him/her to do a thorough exam. Preferably you should see someone that can perform stroboscopy, as diagnosis of vocal pathology without stroboscopy can be hit or miss. I hope that this helps.

Steven M. Feinberg MD

www.newportvoiceandswallow.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Dr. Feinberg,

Yes your reply helped!

May I ask one more question? Six months ago, I breathed fumes from a new, heated computer power supply, and its manufacturer has refused to inform me what chemicals may have emitted the fumes. I coughed for two months afterwards, and the back of my nasal cavity had excessive mucus for several months; and may still have minor symptoms.

My ENT doctor said there are no tests to measure the effects of these fumes. Do you know of any specialists dealing in the area of fumes damage and treatment?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Chen,

I concur with your ENT doctor that there is no such test to measure the effects of the fumes. As far as a non-productive cough following an irritant exposure, those problems often fall within the realm of the otolaryngologist or the pulmonologist, and get lumped under the category of "irritable larynx syndrome?. Airway hypersensitivity occasionally develops but it is hard to establish a causative factor (viral injection vs. irritant exposure). Regardless of the inciting irritant, I would focus on treating the excessive mucus and minimizing the cough.

By the way, how do you create your signature beneath your posting?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Dr. Feinberg,

On the "Forum Navbar" (second horizontal menu from top), click "Profile". Then click "Personality", and complete the signature portion.

BTW, if you would like to learn how to increase your practice's recognition, please let me know. I do some web marketing with gastroenterologists and had already thought about how to make a physician well known. It is possible for your practice to be recognized as a worldwide authority using web methods.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...