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Twang application help!

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Wildcat
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I've been working simultaneously with the 4 Pillars of Singing, KTVA, and CVT. For me the first two cover a lot of the technical nuances that I need to work on, while CVT points me more toward the sound/tone/style I want. Vowel modifications, light mass onsets, and the the cry are coming along well to me while I'm actually singing and not exercising, but twang is really frustrating me. I can exercise with it, and I can quack, then engage the intrinsic anchoring and get a big boomy sort of sound, but while I'm singing in "performance mode", I can't seem to activate twang without bringing in extra constrictors or I quack before I sing the lyrics. This becomes a big problem when singing in the f4-c5 range as the cry/hold I use starts to increase alot to compensate for the lacking amount of twang, and my sound gets too restrained. After quacking and engaging the intrinsic anchoring, and heavily supporting I can even get this cool gritty/screamy sound. Does anyone have any tips in isolating control of the twanger while actually singing? If I had a more instinctive control of twang, I really think my sound would even out and be freer in the tenor range. Thanks!

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I've been working simultaneously with the 4 Pillars of Singing, KTVA, and CVT. For me the first two cover a lot of the technical nuances that I need to work on, while CVT points me more toward the sound/tone/style I want. Vowel modifications, light mass onsets, and the the cry are coming along well to me while I'm actually singing and not exercising, but twang is really frustrating me. I can exercise with it, and I can quack, then engage the intrinsic anchoring and get a big boomy sort of sound, but while I'm singing in "performance mode", I can't seem to activate twang without bringing in extra constrictors or I quack before I sing the lyrics. This becomes a big problem when singing in the f4-c5 range as the cry/hold I use starts to increase alot to compensate for the lacking amount of twang, and my sound gets too restrained. After quacking and engaging the intrinsic anchoring, and heavily supporting I can even get this cool gritty/screamy sound. Does anyone have any tips in isolating control of the twanger while actually singing? If I had a more instinctive control of twang, I really think my sound would even out and be freer in the tenor range. Thanks!

Wildcat: I am sure many posters will respond for this topic. Here is mine.

Your question sits within the larger context... "How do I learn to sing songs with the same technique that I use for exercises?" One approach for the general question, and for your specific one, is to convert the sound patterns of the song into exercises in their own right.

For example,

- if you can sing a nice G4 with twang in an exercise on a specific vowel, extend the exercise to all vowels so that you can twang them all without constriction

- if you can twang all the vowels on that note, onset each of them repeatably, looking for each one of the onsets to twang and not constricted.

- if you can onset that G4 on all twanged vowels unconstricted, combine each of those vowels with a voiced consonant, i.e., preceed all of the vowels with

V, Z, and voiced TH, French J (as in Je or vision,) L, M and N, B, G, flipped R, looking to achieve a twanged, unconstricted vowel after each consonant.

- if you can sing that G4 twangy/unconstricted after all the voiced vowels, repeat the exercise with all the common unvoiced consonants, i.e.,

T, K, F, S, SH, unvoiced TH, looking to achieve a twanged vowel after each consonant.

- if you can sing all your vowels after all the initial consonants in twangy/unconstricted fashion, pick a song and analyze its consonant and vowel patterns, one sound at a time, and practice...

- sirening the melody on a single vowel, all the way though, in time, and with unconstricted twang

- singing the melody on all the vowels included in the text, in time, and with unconstricted twang. This is singing the song without consonants.

- singing each word individually, in isolation, as if it was not in the song, using its notes, consonants and vowels, looking for clean consonant pronunciation, and your twang/unconstricted production of well-shaped vowels, and to create the tone you want with those particular sound combinations. DO NOT think of this as singing the WORDS. Think of it as SINGING the SOUNDS. at this point.

- Putting each phrase of sounds together, melody, consonants, vowels, looking for your unconstricted twang.

- Putting all the phrases together into verses of sounds, looking for ....

- Putting the song together, end-to-end.

When you have finished this, you will have a methodology to use when incorporating technique into a song. All aspects of technique can be applied this way. When you have the song firmly in hand, you can then go back and add the interpretive elements.

I hope this helps,

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