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Questions regarding breaking out of my typical baritone range

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Shrike123311
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Hello everyone. It's a pleasure to see a community of dedicated and beginner musicians alike. I've been looking for a forum like this for a while now.

Now currently, I'm fairly confident I can carry a tune. I know I can sing in tune with at least a decent tone.

I've been playing music for 11 years, but only about a year and a half-ago did I really decide that I want to pursue singing..

So recently I preformed a stage show with a few friends of mine for kicks, but we wanna get bigger and I wanna get better.

I used to have a ton of vocal covers up on youtube, but I deleted them all because I wasn't really getting much feedback for better or for worse.

So my issue comes actually from my influences and the style of music I'm looking into.

My favorite bands are bands like Killswitch Engage, Trivium, All That Remains, Avenged Sevenfold, Periphery, Metallica, System of a down.. just to name a few.

Currently, I can sing almost any Metallica song with a good amount of effort since he has a low, raspy voice. Metallica and Trivium have the easiest material for me..

but I want to hit extreme highs, past the tip of my range at G#4. I want to be able to sing high with extreme power like Avenged Sevenfold and Periphery.

A good example of highs and power from Periphery would be:

<- Jetpacks Was Yes!

though his voice has a scratchy tone to it; which I am not particularly interested in getting, he hits some insane high notes with what sounds like very little effort.

But I also want more depth and power to my voice, like the highs in "Tonight The World Dies" by Avenged Sevenfold.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zr9uWRGNqpA <- Tonight The World Dies

Currently, I can scream and sing pretty clearly utilizing my full range, but.. my full range just doesn't feel like enough. I've been trying to break out of this for a while now and been looking for lessons, but I'm poor and can't afford them. It's so frustrating, because I love singing. I really do.

So to get to the point, I have issues with the notes that come after my G4. my voice gets ridiculously airy and weak, although singing quietly I can get a fairly clean, pretty in-tune tone. But it's far too breathy to be useable, and I just don't know exactly what to do to possibly help boost the volume and darkness in the tone of my voice. I'll be more than willing to put a clip up if anyone is interested in hearing what I'm talking about. So... any tips for an aspiring metal vocalist? Thank you all in advance.

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You probably need to twang more, relax your throat more, and improve your breath support. Use the search button to look for those topics here, as the forum is FILLED with discussions about them. Check out the "high rasp" thread also. But honestly, I think that your best bet would be to put aside just a bit of money each month until you can at least afford to buy some vocal program and preferably a good vocal coach who specializes in rock singing, either via Skype lessons or, even better, seeing him/her in person on a regular basis. Until you do, it might help you if you could post a clip of you trying to sing like this so we could see what you're currently doing wrong and gradually you might improve. But you have to be willing to really practice a lot, be patient and also consider spending some cash for instructionals and/or lessons in the near future. No one is gonna GIVE you the skills to sing like you want. You have to work hard for it. But also realize that it CAN be learned. Good luck, dude.

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You kidding me bro? I'd love to practice. And sure, if I had the cash, I'd buy. I know it can be learned, which is part of the reason I am asking. That being said, thank you for the advice. I do want to know; what is twang?

also, I shall post a clip later today. Thanks again.

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You kidding me bro? I'd love to practice. And sure, if I had the cash, I'd buy. I know it can be learned, which is part of the reason I am asking. That being said, thank you for the advice. I do want to know; what is twang?

also, I shall post a clip later today. Thanks again.

yo, my man from brooklyn, i'm from yonkers!!!

jonpall gave you real good advice. i'd like to give you more:

exercise the voice at least 4, better 5 or 6 days a week.

try to down at least 8 or more glasses of water a day.

stay away from alcohol and smoking.

avoid a lot of foods that produce a lot of mucus, like cheese, cream soups, cakes and pasteries.

be patient with your progress. if you apply yourself, it will come, but you have to be patient.

bob

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Your best bet starting out would be to find a good vocal program such as Robert Luntes “4 Pillars”. Breath management, open throat, twang, vowel modification, precise onsets, thinning out your folds are all required to work in coordinated tandem to navigate through the first break area and beyond. Sound like you made it through most of the first passaggio (G4) and are encountering the next tricky stretch that requires more adjustments.

Here are a couple of ideas you could start with…

Practice sirening up and down the scale to your G4 using all the different vowel sounds. Keep the volume as consistent and level as you can. When you can do this with ease and the throat feels open (not constricting) bump it up a half step to G#4 and practice that pitch the same way. Do it at your own pace and work your way up slowly over time with no self imposed deadlines.

Do single note messa de voce exercises starting at some lower pitch using all your vowel sounds. Work you way up the pitches half step at a time practicing all your vowels. Stop at whatever pitch you start to lose technique or constriction and airiness is setting in. Move up in pitch slowly as your technique improves, no self imposed deadlines.

Basically you just have to spend a lot of trial and error changing up the amount of air, open throat, twang, etc looking for the right configuration wherever you are having difficulties. A lot of people, including myself have tried this on our own and you will make progress; but there is no doubt a trained teacher with good ears will push you down the right path much quicker. Also this board is chock full of good info on all these different topics. Posting sound clips of what you are trying to do is also a good idea as you will get some pretty good pointers about your problem areas.

You can definitely go a lot higher with power and ease, as just about everyone can, if you systematically work at it. It just takes dedication and smart practice.

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http://up.ht/rrxjdv here's a clip of my singing. The rasp isn't being forced at all, it feels completely natural, but I can't get any higher than the pitch I'm singing here. I feel so relaxed singing like this though.. so.. you can see where my problem is here. :P

not to mention, my intonation definitely isn't at it's best here. I recorded it for reference, so if you want a more in tune clip I'd be happy to provide one.

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I think that was an F#4 high note. It sounded like you had a lot of chest voice (TA) muscle activation. What would really be helpful is if you went a little higher where you actually start to fail. My first guess is you need to learn to thin your cords using the (CT) muscles that stretch the folds while letting off the (TA) muscles.

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http://up.ht/rrxjdv here's a clip of my singing. The rasp isn't being forced at all, it feels completely natural, but I can't get any higher than the pitch I'm singing here. I feel so relaxed singing like this though.. so.. you can see where my problem is here. :P

not to mention, my intonation definitely isn't at it's best here. I recorded it for reference, so if you want a more in tune clip I'd be happy to provide one.

may i make a suggestion shrike? i hear you singing with too much of the pronunciation of talking causing you lock and constrict at certain points.

you have to downplay the consonants, and get more to the open vowel sounds relative to those lyrics....follow?

addendum: and as the voice moves more into the higher register, (out of the speaking voice range) pronunciation can take a back seat (generally) to arrive at solid resonant tone. if you listen to the singer, (singing live a better choice) you'll hear tradeoffs in pronunciation and more emphasis on resonance and tone. hope i've helped. bob

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interesting. In my headvoice, twang comes quite naturally to me. I just don't know how to get it into my chest voice to actually help me bridge my registers.

Shrike: If you can twang in your head voice, and not in your chest voice, then top-down scale patterns or sirens are excellent for you. For example, pick your twangiest head voice vowel, sing it on the Ab above middle C, and then slowly sing the scale downward to the Eb 5 notes down, maintaining twang. If it 'falls out' of head voice, that's fine, but the next time go more slowly.

Twang is caused by a posture of the vocal tract, and not a characteristic of the phonation itself. Perhaps this exercise will help you discover how to maintain your twang as you transition into your middle range.

I hope this helps.

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