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Queen - Too much love will kill you

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Vladislav99
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Thanks for the comment, 8DACDDDE!

Well, not sure, it's more like I put some pressure on my ligaments :( It sounds tensely, though this way I just tried to express emotions.

It doesn't hurt, but still it's a long way for me left to master properly the second half of the first octave.

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Bravo, Vlad. And I can hear quite a bit of american sound in it, a testament to your ability to overcome accent. I have wondered what a Queen song, such as this one, would sound like with a dramatic voice, rather than Freddie's lyrico tessitura. And now I hear it. You have a dramatic style and sound similar to Michael Aday, a Dallas, Texas native and one of my favorite singers. Most people know him as Meatloaf. And I do mean that as a high compliment. I could totally see you covering "Paradise by the Dashboard Light" and "I Would do anything for Love." You have that big voice that such songs seem to require. Definitely a bigger voice than mine. When I say big, I mean dramatico with a large range.

Quite a theatrical performance, which is perfect, as I think that is what this song requires.

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Thanks for a positive answer and good advice, ronws!

The source of my dramatism is academic school. For now I learn to control it. Nobody needs opera instead of hard-rock :)

Ronnie Dio, whom I consider to be one of the greatest vocalists of all times, could sing both dramatic and lyrical, like in "The Sign of the Southern Cross". I still need to learn how to sing lyrical and soft. Singing ballads to overcome it might help.

As for theatrical performance - don't know, if it's good or bad... sometimes I think it's way too much, but when I, for example, listen to Camilo Sesto, I even don't know what to think:

<< though anyhow spanish people are very, very emotional!

Thanks for the comment about the accent and, actually, thanks to my english teachers.

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Vlad, I disagree with your statement that nobody needs opera instead of hard-rock. But then, I am an odd person. I totally get off on an operatic voice in a hard rock setting, like this.

And before anyone tells me that Bruce was not singing operatically, I totally triple-dog dare anyone to read his interview in Martin's book "The Secrets of Heavy Rock Singers." Bruce taught himself from a book entitled "How to Sing." There were only two books with that title at the time. One was by Graham Hewiit (the one I read, back in 1988.) The other was by Lilli Lehmann, the premiere soprano coloratura of her day and one of the best known teachers of the classical method.

Opera has an important place in Heavy Metal. Heavy Metal has a strong influence of classical music in it, by way of arrangement and virtuosity. Others' mileage may vary. I'm just an old fart with a sense of music appreciation.

Edited to add:

From the stage moves to the props, to the tightly orchestrated guitars, this is classical. And it is opera, even if Bruce doesn't sound exactly like Jussi or Enrico. If others can't see that this is opera, then my point is lost and such is life. C'est la Vie...

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Good one, Keith. And just as classically arranged as "The Trooper." Just because Bruce didn't use "oscuro" on every note does note mean it was not opera. And just because it's amplified guitars instead of cellos and violas and tubas does not mean that it was not opera. Especially since the advent of Wagner, who change the face of music from the old empirical school of italian "bel canto." The only singer to transiton that period was Enrico Caruso. And trust me, Bruce is singing in the tradition of Caruso. I beg any one to read Bruce's explanation of his warm-up and tell me it's not like Caruso's method.

I will be waiting a long time for a valid reply.

Another challenge. I ask anyone to read about the Caruso method as detailed by his friend, fellow singer, and scientist, Dr. Mariafiotta. His manuscript was approved and supported by Caruso, himself, after careful review, as evidenced in archived letters.

And yes, we can learn from Caruso, even as we sing rock, blues, heavy metal, whatever.

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Bruce is a great singer, yes! And "hallowed be thy name" is one of my favourites!

Well, I think, that opera is opera, while hard rock is hard rock. Two different genres, though, ofc, we can't deny the influence opera had on hard-rock.

Still you can't imagine opera singers sound like Bruce, and Bruce like Pavarotti. :) If we just imagine this, then we'll see the difference. nah, don't need to imagine, here it it:

Two different songs, don't you find?

As for me Dio's voice is the best mixture of opera and hard-rock. It's capacity was impressive. And even being old he could deliever the song's message:

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no-no, I think that you clearly showed, that my interpretation, based only on my hearing, is profane. Ofc, nobody doubts that opera and rock differ. But this deffernce, noted through hearing only, doesn't prove, that these two genres are different inherently.

the question is how to separate two correctly. For that we need to go into vocal technique and see what operatic techniques rock singers use.

What's placed on the other side of the line? Is it opera and folk-singing like two opposite ends of the line? Should we place rock music somewhere in between?

Or may be, if we consider ourselves pure positivists, then we should go right into the throat, lol, and see what happens there, when Adams and Pavarotti sing. And catch the difference.

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Just listened to your Deep Purple covers and I actualy think that you sang them "lighter" then the feeling of the original songs, but I must say - the high notes on the end of Smoke on the Water were killer !!!!!!! Was that head voice with some kind of distortion?

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Thanks for the comment, Duchi.

You're right, it was head voice with distortion, as I see it. I just imagine, that the voice goes out of the center of my forehead. The higher the note, the higher is the place I feel my voice goes out. High end, may be even, from the top of the head. Smt like this :)

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