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Higher part voice

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Mertd
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Hey you guys,

how ya doing?

when i sing in the highter part of my range (above g4) overdrive goes kinda wel on eh and oh vowels

but my curbing is a total fail :)

here's a clip when i do sirens:

http://www.box.net/shared/68r1vdr11vlnst6a50i5

the first ones are overdrive, well yeah i think they are :)

then the curbing sirens (uh/i/o) come and they are a fail,

then i get distortion or flip or something.

can someone help me with this :) what am i doing wrong?

thanks!!!

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Hi!

Try to raise your soft palate slightly but watch your lanrynx not go down much. If it not works - try add some tension on palete and also decrease hold a little, when you go up.

You can also, try to alter your vowels more to the most camfortamble one.

regards!

:)

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Mert, towards the top of the range, the tongue should approach the 'i' vowel ("ee") and you shape the actual vowel in the word with your lips. For example, in 'i' formation, you would purse you lips to make the 'u' ("oo") sound. As difficult as that sounds, it's made easier by practicing the italian vowels, first. Frisell is right. Most people, especially americans, malform the vowels.

Different vowel "stations", one might call them, resonate better in different parts of the range. ee for the high end and ah or ah modified to aw in the low end. These vowel stations involve different heights and shapes of the tongue, which either aids or hampers sounds rising into the resonant cavities they need.

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...

then the curbing sirens (uh/i/o) come and they are a fail,

then i get distortion or flip or something.

can someone help me with this :) what am i doing wrong?

Mertd: Since you use CVT terminology, I will use that in my suggestions.

I listened to your clip. Here is what comes to mind.

1) Essential twang is just that.... essential. Yours comes and goes. Your overall tone quality consistency will get much better as your twang becomes consistent throughout the range. Twang on!

2) Some vowels don't work well at all in the higher range... for overdrive or curbing. Most male voices trend toward a shade of UH or OE (foot, heard) or even Aw or O. I suggest you experiment with sirens on a few of them to find the best ones for you. Remember, singing involves sustaining notes, and the 'best' vowel for a note will likely vary from note to note.

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