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AurimasP
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Hey everyone.My problem is getting into my head voice.I've done those vocal fry and edge exercises over and over ,the lip rolls everything .All I can get into is what you hear in the audio. And I don't even know what it is ,I sure as hell can't sing in that tone. It feels so closed off, but it also feels like if I could somehow open up that (whatever it is I'm doing in the audio lol) I could sing in head voice . Anyways any help would be great because I'm really stuck right now , it's so frustrating ...

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/22815080/headvoiice.wma

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Head voice is not just a range of pitches, it is also a place of resonance. So, let the note resonate in your head. And give it just a little more air.

AurimasP: In addition to what ronws said... what makes you think that you are not already singing in head voice in your posted audio? I think you are! Its light, to be sure, but its head.

I think an exercise that will be beneficial for you would be to go from an NG consonant and to open up to a vowel. Begin the NG (like at the end of the word 'sing', on the G below middle C, and then siren up on that consonant to the G above middle C, hold it a moment, and then slide back down. Repeat that a whole cycle a few times to familiarize your self. Then, when you get to the top G, open the NG to an EH, as in the English word 'head'. Just let whatever comes out come out, and slide back down to the G below. Repeat a few times, and then transpose the exercise to Ab and repeat.

If you would, please post a recording of this exercise, and we can help you proceed from there.

The 2nd component of making a brilliant head voice is the presence of twang. We will be able to recommend to you how much you will need based on your new recording.

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@Rowns : Cheers ! Yes I get what you mean but I'm not sure how to practically do it . I just can place the resonance in my head.

@Steven : Thank you for the great reply I really appreciate it .To answer you question : it sounds so squeezed or something ,not nice to the ears at all so I suppose that's why I think it's not head voice. I've tried your exercise and made possibly the ugliest sound known to man . My voice is breaking all over the place and I don't know what I can do . Can my voice be damaged so bad I can't recover a head voice ? Anyyways here's the audio :

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/22815080/Worstsoundevermade.mp3

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@Steven : Thank you for the great reply I really appreciate it .To answer you question : it sounds so squeezed or something ,not nice to the ears at all so I suppose that's why I think it's not head voice. I've tried your exercise and made possibly the ugliest sound known to man . My voice is breaking all over the place and I don't know what I can do . Can my voice be damaged so bad I can't recover a head voice ?

Aurimas: Thanks for posting the example. I heard a number of things going on.

First of all, you have a light head voice, but it is not very connected to the rest of the range when you do this exercise. As you slide up, I hear you letting the firmer production cut out, which indicates to me that there is an area of coordination in the passaggio that you have not yet determined how to do smoothly.

There are two basic ways to approach this... one 'top-down', and one 'bottom-up'. I use them both.

The top down approach is to siren downward (or sing downward scales) from the top, and to go slowly and softly enough through the passaggio so that the delicate balance of head voice production does not crack into chest voice.

The bottom-up approach is to maintain connection of the chest voice while setting up the circumstances for the vocal bands to make the lengthening/thinning motion. My personal faves of these sorts of exercises are slow, medium-volume sirens using semi-occluded voiced consonants, such as TH, V, Z, lip buzzes, puffed-cheek singing, etc.

Both the top-down and the bottom-up exercise should be done with posture that prevents the collapse of the chest, and with medium-to-low breath pressure.

I hope this is helpful.

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